Ever regret going to a concert?

boris bubbanov

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What really spoils a guy, in New Orleans, was leaving the venue and being home, with your head on a pillow, within the hour. IMO this enables the brain to convert all the memories to long form.

If you try to travel to and from a venue, all the driving and hotels and waiting just permits all the experience to become unraveled and it gets lost. Or at least for me it gets lost.

Another problem: Even if I do enjoy the show and the memories get locked in, this normally means another show from 18 years or 35 years or more ago, somehow gets lost along the way. It is like a zero sum situation.

Struggling with whether to try to get in to see John Hiatt in Chattanooga next week. I just feel like I'm going to be miserable, having to work so hard to do what was silly, ridiculously easy to accomplish living right down close to everything in New Orleans.
 

AAT65

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Yes, touring their new album, Drama. ****ing hated it. And I was a big Yes fan back then.
I saw Yes on that tour too (at the good old Glasgow Apollo). It’s the only time I’ve seen Yes. I actually enjoyed it mostly, especially Steve Howe’s contributions, but Trevor Horn couldn‘t match Jon Anderson’s vocals and a decent section of the crowd made sure he knew it. I think it was that concert that persuaded Trevor Horn to get out from behind the mic and focus on the recording console instead.
 

ClashCityTele

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I saw The Eagles of Death Metal 3 days before the Bataclan terrorist massacre.
They sounded nothing like their albums. It was full on Orange amp fueled 70's heavy metal.
I almost walked out after 20 mins.
As I was leaving I heard some 20 something guy say 'I may as well have listened to some 70's metal'. Exactly.
 

Shango66

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George Clinton P Funk, 2000 ish.
Same song grooves, went on and on and on and on.
boring.
I really dig those early funkadelic albums, but no, this was a fail.
 

ClashCityTele

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I saw Baz Warne of the Stranglers at a local solo gig.
He's from Sunderland, I'm from Newcastle. Huge football (soccer) rivalry. In fact rivalry about absolutely everything.
He said he wasn't going to mention football then spent the entire evening slagging off Newcastle.
I could have quite happily smashed his stupid face in with a chair.
I was so angry when I walked home. Good job it was free!
My partner is from Sunderland & even she hates him.
 

Flyboy

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I saw Yes on that tour too (at the good old Glasgow Apollo). It’s the only time I’ve seen Yes. I actually enjoyed it mostly, especially Steve Howe’s contributions, but Trevor Horn couldn‘t match Jon Anderson’s vocals and a decent section of the crowd made sure he knew it. I think it was that concert that persuaded Trevor Horn to get out from behind the mic and focus on the recording console instead.
I can just imagine that Glasgow crowd. Glasgow is notorious for letting artists and performers know exactly what they think of them!
 

Matt G

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Molly Hatchet. Massive amps that were way too big and turned up for the small venue they were in. Noise went into the pain threshold and we left after the first song.
Once upon a time, in a universe far far away, I lived about a mile from a venue where Molly Hatchet (at the peak of their fame) played a concert. Even at that range it was loud enough to be seriously wrong and offensive. Just stupid loud. Permanent-hearing-damage loud. Anyone with two brain cells would've regretted going.
 

Martinp

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I saw Russell Peters (the alleged comedian) at the music fair, and he spent the evening espousing the benefits of a bidet vs TP. one word EWWWWWWW
 

Matt G

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Yeah, I get it. I have concluded that from now on I need a seat. An actual seat, with a back, and a cushion, and maybe armrests. No more standing in one spot for two hours. No more sitting on the ground. No more dealing with jerkoffs shoving their way in front of you. I want upholstery, dammit.
Bingo. This has been the reason why I've given up on concerts these last several years. At these prices I've paid for a seat, so I want one. And I'm at a point in life where I don't want to have to fight nupties, either.

From another angle, I can forgo the seat if I'm guaranteed no nupties. But . . . well, I repeat myself.
 

agejaded

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So many:

Eric Clapton, Money & Cigarettes tour in 1983 at the Edinburgh Playhouse. It should have been branded the ‘money for old rope’ tour. Clapton went through the motions but he wasn’t there on stage. Never saw him live again.

Monsters of Rock 1984. I went specifically to see Van Halen. They were dreadful, they only played a 45 minute set and managed to include a sword dance, a bass solo, a drum solo and a really tedious guitar solo. Decided I’d never try and see them live again.

Elvia Costello 1989 at the Edinburgh Playhouse. Turns out it was a solo tour, with him playing an acoustic guitar. I fell asleep after the first song and woke up for the encores. Never went to see him again.

Seal at the Edinburgh Playhouse, I think it was 1991? From the first song I could see that the band looked uncomfortable and they were frantically looking at each other trying to work out what was going wrong. They just weren’t gelling for some reason. An hour into the set, Seal announced that ‘after a shaky start’ they were going to do something or other. It didn’t get any better.
Vowed I’d never see him again.

Michael Jackson at Glasgow Green in 1992. I humoured my ex wife by going along. It was awful, poor sound and it looked like someone going through the motions. Vowed I’d never see him again.

Marilyn Manson MEN Arena (Manchester) 2001. Dreadful sound and no connection with the audience. It just felt like watching someone go through the motions.

Fleetwood Mac at the SECC Glasgow 2009. The band were probably very good and given their age they had a lot of energy. Unfortunately I was near a speaker that distorted through the whole show. I’m really sensitive to audio so it spoiled it for me.
 

Marc Morfei

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The main thing I note from all the comments on this thread are that we are music connoisseurs, with very refined tastes! We are judgmental, and can tell the difference between something good and something that sucks. Or at least we think we can. ;)

Contrast this with ordinary music consumers, who essentially seem to LOVE EVERYTHING no matter what. I can't think of a single instance in my whole life when somebody I know went to a concert and did not come back to breathlessly report how GREAT it was. People pay their money, they're going to enjoy the hell out if it no matter what.
 

SRBMusic

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Yup. I went to hear Fred Small once. Small restaurant. The guy right next to me knew every word to every song and sang 'em all. Wish he'd known the notes!
Wife and I went to see Dave Matthews at Jiffy Lube. Lawn seats. BIG mistake! Everyone up there was stoned or drunk, loud, totally into their own drama and not listening to the music at all. We moved to the parking lot, where we could still hear okay but be by ourselves. The band was great, AFAIK. Saw them again last year at Pilgrimage Festival. Fantastic. And the crowd was much, much better.
 

RiverDog

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Janes Addiction at the Tower Theater in Upper Darby, PA, 1990-ish. The Buck Pets opened and me and my buddy had no idea who they were and were bored to tears by their music. Then JA came on and played for less than 15 minutes before Perry Farrell threw a fit and stormed off the stage, followed by the other 3 guys. The band never came back on and everyone booed for 10 or 15 min until an announcer finally said the show was over as the house lights came up. The crowd finally filtered out the doors, where a large number of people gathered around the band's bus, doing what an intoxicated, angry crowd does. As we were leaving we could see people rocking the bus back and forth and banging on it. Such a bummer.
 

Duggo

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Aerosmith just after the great sellout. This was Fargo, ND in the mid '90s. They put on a flat, lifeless, phoned in performance that was really disappointing. Jackyl opened and I liked them more than I thought I would.
 

Charlie Bernstein

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So many:

Eric Clapton, Money & Cigarettes tour in 1983 at the Edinburgh Playhouse. It should have been branded the ‘money for old rope’ tour. Clapton went through the motions but he wasn’t there on stage. . . .
A shame! Garcia went to a Cream concert once, and his comment afterwards was that he loved the show because Clapton acted like he knew there was an audience.

(Around the same time, the Dead all went to a Rolling Stones concert, and after seeing the show they figured: If that's all there is to it, this is gonna be easy!)
 

Charlie Bernstein

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What really spoils a guy, in New Orleans, was leaving the venue and being home, with your head on a pillow, within the hour. IMO this enables the brain to convert all the memories to long form.

If you try to travel to and from a venue, all the driving and hotels and waiting just permits all the experience to become unraveled and it gets lost. Or at least for me it gets lost.

Another problem: Even if I do enjoy the show and the memories get locked in, this normally means another show from 18 years or 35 years or more ago, somehow gets lost along the way. It is like a zero sum situation.

Struggling with whether to try to get in to see John Hiatt in Chattanooga next week. I just feel like I'm going to be miserable, having to work so hard to do what was silly, ridiculously easy to accomplish living right down close to everything in New Orleans.
I've never traveled far to hear music. Maybe an hour or so tops. Oops! Correction: A few years ago, my wife discovered that the US portion of Joan Baez's farewell tour was finishing up at a New York theater where I used to usher. So for old time's sake, we went down, stayed with friends, saw the show, did some happy hanging out, and came home. Great time had all 'round.

And I once traveled from here to Cincinnati to buy a guitar. Definitely worth the trip!
 




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