Ever collected items hoping they would gain value later?

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by Hey_you, Jun 29, 2020.

  1. telleutelleme

    telleutelleme Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

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    I sold the #1 & #3 transformer toys for $1500. $12.00 investment. But to be honest I bought them for my kid and he wanted GI Joe stuff. Pulled them out of a closet many years later and looked online to see what they were worth.
     
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  2. tubegeek

    tubegeek Tele-Afflicted

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    I once found a copy of Catcher In The Rye in the trash, it was in good shape and still had Salinger's photo on the dust jacket. (He had it removed after the second or third printing.)

    That one did OK on eBay.
     
  3. bgmacaw

    bgmacaw Friend of Leo's

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    My wife and I used to have an antique business, so yes. I don't know if it was collecting so much as flipping for profit though. Other than furniture, we primarily sought out mid-century wall and mantle clocks and tobacciana. We still have a few pieces around that might get sold at some point.
     
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  4. JL_LI

    JL_LI Friend of Leo's

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    My mother in law was a collector. Maybe she was a hoarder. I've posted about her toilet paper fort when the pandemic struck. "Edie" collected stamps, jewelry, commemorative coins, Franklin mint anything, Hummel and Lladro figurines, old china, and old newspapers. Newspapers had stories about the Kennedy assassination, the moon landings, Nixon's resignation, the Andrea Doria which sank off Long Island in the 1950's. The stuff had to be distributed or discarded when she died. One figurine is enough. My youngest son took the stamps and hasn't opened the album once. The stamps can't be sold because no one collects them anymore. The plates and commemorative coins went in the dumpster with what was left of the toilet paper fort and the contents of the basement pantry that got its start when the Russians were coming. Out went 100 handbags and 200 shoes. Jewelry was divided among the family. Most of it looked dated and was sold for what it weighed. We have a $40,000 diamond necklace "designed" for her in a vault. It can't be sold as a piece because it's hideous looking and the stones are mostly over sized baguette cuts that can't be used without being cut down. There was too much of everything to toss in the casket.

    My point is that if you want to collect, collect for yourself. My mother in law enjoyed HAVING all her stuff. Don't collect for investment because you'll never sell it for what it's worth to you and if you collect enough of it, it will wind up in the dumpster when you die. As for me, my Telecaster comes with me. My FCS Strat and Mesa Boogie amp go to my grandson. He's three now but will grow into it. His mother insists on a quiet house so I guess the gift to my grandson is as much a gift to her as to him.
     
  5. Pualee

    Pualee Tele-Holic

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    That's not an investment, but I appreciate the attitude :)

    I remember when the bank actually paid out interest... those were the days.
     
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  6. teletimetx

    teletimetx Doctor of Teleocity

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    I happen to think there is a certain, how you say je ne sais quo, um, esthetic cultural forecasting required for successful collections.

    For example, I think my collection of Dead Stuff I Found on the Beach was perhaps too obscure and not nearly as successful as my Roadkill Collection- a pungent and plangent reminder of human damage to the faunasphere.

    I think I probably hit my peak with the Barf Bags of Bankrupt Airlines.

    But if life is short, well, sometimes it’s long, too and I may be ripe for a comeback.
     
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  7. Mike SS

    Mike SS Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    Because of my chosen profession, mechanic, I have a large collection of hand tools. They hold their value well.
    I collect the odd HotWheels, when one catches my eye. Some I have left in original packaging.
    I do own a collectible rifle, which I inherited from my father. It is worth several hundred dollars.
     
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  8. catdaddy

    catdaddy Tele-Afflicted

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    My grandmother got me started collecting pennies when I was about 7 years old. She gave me a sack of old pennies she had laying around that had coins from 1857 to 1945 in it. I bought display books for the pennies, organized them and started collecting current (at the time) pennies to add to my collection; all the time thinking that when I grew up those pennies would be worth a lot of money. Well, I still have those coins and they're priceless to me in terms of the memories I have of my grandmother and the fun I had learning about and collecting those pennies, but the whole collection probably has a current value of about $200.
     
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  9. naveed211

    naveed211 Tele-Afflicted

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    No, in fact I’ve bought stuff for pretty cheap and sold it off too quickly without making a profit only for it to be much more valuable years later.

    Had a JCM800 that I bought for $500 when I was first getting into tube amps about 17 years ago. They typically go for at least twice that now.

    Baseball cards got lost in one of my many moves at some point. I don’t think I had any valuable ones....

    I just buy stuff I like and keep what I like. Hopefully my 401k has better luck with increasing in value.
     
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  10. Torren61

    Torren61 Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    Yes, you wanna buy some Beanie babies? (kidding) Do albums count?
     
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  11. nojazzhere

    nojazzhere Doctor of Teleocity

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    In the early nineties, I worked with a guy whose daughters collected Beanie Babies, from McDonalds. He told me he wouldn't let them open the packages, that they're more valuable that way. I kinda asked if he expected to get rich or something? He replied no, not rich.....but they should pay for his kid's college educations. ;)
    Can you even GIVE Beanie Babies away today? McDonalds only gave away about a JILLION of them.......
     
  12. 985plowboy

    985plowboy Friend of Leo's

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    Seeds.
     
  13. Fretting out

    Fretting out Friend of Leo's

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    I think I still have my Pokémon cards from the late 90’s early 2000’s

    Some of them are actually worth some okay money

    But no, I never really bought anything expecting the value to rise because usually it doesn’t except for some specific things
     
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  14. Old Plank

    Old Plank Tele-Holic Silver Supporter

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    Always been a collector since childhood and still am .... over the years, coins, stamps, US President milk bottle caps (remember those?), comic books, sports cards, records, books, matchbooks, guitars, amps etc. .... in nutshell what I've seem is the majority of these things that got to be worth quite eye-opening amounts at various times have largely plummeted or at least declined ... Baseball cards being a case in point, the industry and collecting interest exploded in the 80's and 90's, lots of those cards hit really high values, and now dealers don't even want to see anything post-70's, it's worth pennies save for a very few items. O' course I'm one of those who when my parents moved, they threw out all sorts of my things including a full big drawer full of 60's baseball cards, full set of Beatles cards, various autographs like Satchel Paige that I got myself, boxes of early years Marvel and DC comics, etc. .... ah well, water under the bridge!

    Edit: to answer the OP's question, no was never buying these things thinking about future possible values, except for the later sports cards and some of the guitars/amps.
     
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  15. schmee

    schmee Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

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    I regularly miss opportunities of appreciation. Many amps or guitars I had that I thought really weren't that desirable, or had maxed out on price, doubled in price in 5 years or so. You just never know I guess.
    I'm good at that! I sell stock before much appreciation too!
     
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  16. Controller

    Controller Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    My practice has been to buy high and sell low. It's worked for me so far...

    I can relate to the guy on Antiques Roadshow where they say "It wasn't made in China during the Ming dynasty, it was made in Hong Kong during the 1970s. It's worthless!"
     
    Last edited: Jun 30, 2020
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  17. rjtwangs

    rjtwangs Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    20190306_175204.jpg
    Some may have seen this picture of my button/badge collection. Everything you see here collectively is worth approximately $1600.00!! With the Flamin' Groovies button being worth approximately $500.00. It's the yellow button with the big white smile. Many of the buttons being in the $20-$35.00 range. I'm still collecting and have another 25 or so that I've yet to make room for. I'm excited about the two Kursaal Flyers buttons that just arrived from the UK!!
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    Don't ask what I paid for them!! I'm a huge fan of " Pub Rock " and have a decent collection.


    RJ
     
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  18. telemnemonics

    telemnemonics Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Stuff I want to keep goes up in value.
    Investments for profit?

    I was an antique dealer for a while but never used the long term storage theory.
    The problem with the collectibles market is that stuff only has value if lots of people WANT stuff there's no actual need for.
    If I was going to "invest" in stuff, expecting the value to increase, I'd start with real estate, followed by real estate and as a last resort turn to real estate.

    Of course applying the buy low sell high principle means don't buy at a market peak like so many did in the real estate boom.
    Odd that folks do that sort of thing, but folks will be folks...
     
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  19. jvin248

    jvin248 Poster Extraordinaire

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    Over a decade ago my folks gave me back a box of misc stuff I had as a kid including two old metal lunch boxes. One was an old cylinder top with graphics like stickers on a traveling suitcase and the second a well beat up "relic" H R Puff-n-Stuff I had been given as a hand-me-down from my cousins that I used that all through elementary school. It was practical but I never liked it, not fond of the show at the time which had been off the air for a few years by then -- I knew it was uncool but it's what we had. Anyway that one hit a lunch box collector wave and I shipped that out along with the generic one to another collector buyer.

    I have some old Star Wars cards I traded for back in the 70s. One of the things I did was kept a small stack of the pack wrappers too, figuring those would be scarce eventually. Those turned out to be pretty valuable, more so than a lot of the cards. However, the most recent movies in that franchise killed much of the potential interest and value for all that old stuff. My son makes much more money flipping Magic The Gathering cards (he knows that market like a stock broker) than the old collection I have is worth. They store fairly compactly.

    .
     
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  20. Piggy Stu

    Piggy Stu Friend of Leo's

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    I have had a career dealing with the bankruptcies of other people and liquidating their estates. Mostly anyone who thought they were buying for enhanced value in objects got it wrong and picked the lemon

    The few things that were big hits would have been hard to guess, but I would say they were produced in fine quality by people with a passion in limited number

    It has taught me that I do not think I can guess the future better than market price, and buy expecting no appreciation in value

    Ideally I buy used, mint condition, and pay cash for something fine but unfashionable. Most things I buy I eventually sell for more than I paid, but not astounding figures, and I am always prepared for total write off
     
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