Epiphone uses oil or water poly?

Discussion in 'Finely Finished' started by Fullmoon07, Aug 20, 2019.

  1. Fullmoon07

    Fullmoon07 Tele-Meister

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    I sanded my 2018 Epiphone Casino neck a little too much in one spot and exposed some bare wood area about 2” by 1/2 “. Should I cover it by applying poly and does it matter if it’s oil or water based poly?
     
  2. Fullmoon07

    Fullmoon07 Tele-Meister

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    Would nail polish work?
     
  3. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Friend of Leo's

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  4. Silverface

    Silverface Poster Extraordinaire Platinum Supporter

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    Nail polish is lacquer. It will not blend in.

    It's doubtful you will end up with an invisible repair no matter what you use. Water or oil based makes no difference. The only adhesion you get with polyurethane is mechanical - not chemical. It does not melt and chemically bond like lacquer. For good adhesion you need slight "tooth" - roughness of the existing surface. Then youu could use spray or wiping polyurethane.

    But both the color and gloss - over the bare AND coated areas - will be different than the existing finish. The only ways to get it consistent are 1) stripping and complete refinishing, or 2) a lot of luck. o_O

    The other method is flowing thin Superglue (like the Starbond brand, which comes in different viscosities) VERY lightly over the bare area - a "drop fill". This can work on small areas, but wis a little tough on larger "goofs".

    It's best to practice whichever method you decide to use and get it down to a science before trying anything on the actual neck. Finish a piece of maple scrap with polyurethane, sand a bare spot in it - and try to fix it.

    Good luck

    PS - I think Epi uses a chemical or UV cured polyester - not a polyurethane. A standard polyurethane would take FAR too long to dry considering their current production rates and robotic application methods.
     
  5. Deathray

    Deathray Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    .
     
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