Epic Knobs for Andy (Brainy).

mPacT

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Yeah, sure.

What else big guy?:confused: BTW, for some reason, I am thinking of a mill bastard file as I type this. . . Just remembered, for the edges. That darn plate is sharp!


That Max CLR-HP video is very interesting. Do you guys think the same technique as used on the carbon fiber would be good with fabric for Paisley Teles?

Rex

I wonder how the glue might change the look of the fabric but should work. Try it on some scrap Rex and report back here. Or I can add it to the list of things I'm going to

show,

eventually,

on my no knob, knob making thread.
 

mPacT

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I realized I needed to fix my drill press before I can make some knobs for this technique.
I should point out that for almost twenty years, I have considered my little benchtop drill press from Harbor Freight a complete piece of crap! Thing is, I never set it up properly. I'm not even sure when I learned how to fix it or why I waited until now.

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Basically the drill press had a lot of "run out" or side to side movement whenever I used it. When I pulled the feed handle, you could see the chuck moving sideways at the bottom of the spindles travel.

Part of the reason was this little screw right here. The "fit set screw."
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It adjust the tension on the spindle as it moves up and down. Mine was not adjusted correctly. To be fair, I read the manual that came with it and don't remember anything about that little guy. Anyways, you have to loosen the nut and then tighten the little screw until the spindle wont move. Then carefully, back it out again, until the spindle moves smoothly and tighten the nut again.

The second issue was caused by a badly installed depth guide.

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The threaded rod "feed stop" was loose where it connected at the spindle collar. So again, when the feed handle was pulled down too far, it would force the spindle over. When I disassembled it and examined the threads, I found the the nut provided was not tapped properly which prevented the complete tightening. However, with a little WD40 and some channel locks, problem solved! Now my little drill press is an entirely new animal and I am happy I don't need to buy another. Sorry for the excessive detail but I figure it might benefit somebody out there.


So first I'm going to show how to make a knob with the drill press. To start with, I need a 10-32 bottom tap. That is a tap without the long taper to the tip.

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Like this. The one on the left is a bottom tap, (wrong size.)
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The one on the right is the one I had, a standard tap. The reason it is important is that these knobs are not very tall and you don't get much threading with a standard tap so mine needed to be modified.
 

mPacT

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Easy enough to modify with a Dremel fiberglass cut off wheel.

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Sorry for the soft focus.
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I'm starting with some poplar square stock because. . . well. . . poplar!

(And it's what I had.;))


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I'm going to make this little fellow 18mm x 19mm or .708" x .748"

Drill Press Knob.jpg


So first is measuring and cutting the poplar.

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And as soon as I made the first cut, I realized it was 3am and the neighbors would be pounding on my door with pitchforks and torches for my use of power tools that early in the am! (I even purchased a silent compressor years ago so I could airbrush late at night.) So I had to call it and will finish up when I wake up.
 

DrASATele

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Nice!
I tried this once. They were not knob-tastic
Funny you don't realize how small they are until you try to make them. I have an appreciation for what you are doing, I just gave up and bought some :eek::rolleyes::cool:
 

mPacT

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Nice!
I tried this once. They were not knob-tastic
Funny you don't realize how small they are until you try to make them. I have an appreciation for what you are doing, I just gave up and bought some :eek::rolleyes::cool:

Who knows brother Chris, I may end up giving up and buying some too!

I'm joking. . . totally kidding!
 

John Nicholas

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Mike,

I have a similar drill press, and just recently found that screw! Makes a big difference!

I believe Rich posted tips on how to clean the drill chuck. Somehow the inside jaws accumulate bits of crud and rust pretty quickly, and the drill bit gets clamped in off center... at least it worked better when I cleaned mine!

Now show us the knobs!
 
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mPacT

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You just made what gunsmiths call a bottom tap and then there's plug taps :)

Yes buddy, I said that. Twice! Mr. Didn't actually read the post! :p

Mike,

I have a similar drill press, and just recently found that screw! Makes a big difference!

I believe Rich posted tips on how to clean the drill chuck. Somehow the inside jaws accumulate bits of crud and rust pretty quickly, and the drill bit gets clamped in off center... at least it worked better when I cleaned mine!

Now show us the knobs!

It is a handy tip.

That's a handy dandy tip for the drill press! I gotta check mine when I get home.

Makes a big difference.

Didn't know it existed:oops:

I'm trying to remember where I learned about it.
 

mPacT

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Continuing. I marked the center and the corners making sure not to mark too much off.

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I really need to properly set up my sander. It lets out a horrifying screech every time I turn it on! Eagles in the Himalayas perk up thinking they have heard a mating call.

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Watch those flanges!

Here it is, ready for drilling.

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Next, I measured the BOTTOM TAP's width.
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mPacT

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With the tap measurement, I choose a drill bit that is undersized on purpose. I do this because I like a very snug tapping with no wobble.

IMG_4918.jpg

Actually, I choose a bit that was slightly too small. I should have also probably used a #18. I say that because it was just a little more difficult to turn the tap than I like. I also discovered that my Harbor Freight drill bit index is off by one! Every one of the smaller bits needs to be moved to the right to line up with the description card! No time to figure out where the mistake is.

I put the blank in my nut vice. . . what?

I place a bubble center on the blank to make sure it is properly centered in the vice.

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I drilled down about 1/2". It was at this point that I discovered that despite my best efforts, the drill press just sucks. As soon as the bit entered the wood, the chuck moved!
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After examining it closely, I realized that the spindle itself is defective. Time to get a new drill press, I can still use this one for drum sanding and nut making.
Remember to set your drill press to a fast speed for your woodworking. (Slow speed for metal drilling.)

I then put some thin super glue into the hole and especially on the sides. I try to just wet the wood and not saturate it.
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I waited a few minutes to let the glue harden and then got impatient and placed a drop of Zip Kicker into the hole. Make sure there aren't any big drops in there first or you may need to re-drill the hole! BTW, be careful about inhaling the Zip Kicker too much. There is a persistent story of a prop maker whom supposedly had a heart attack as a result of inhaling too many fumes!

I carefully tapped the hole with the 10-32 BOTTOM TAP I made. Threading it in a little ways, then backing out, then threading it in a little further and repeating until I reached the "stop mark" I placed on the tap. I did this to prevent me from stripping the threads by turning too far.
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mPacT

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I placed a 10-32 x 1.5" machine set screw in the hole and chuck it into the drill press.

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Weeeeeeee!!!

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Shaping wood! Normally, I use both hands for this. Wear goggles! I love my Iwasaki "razor" files! I got mine from Grizzly as they are significantly cheaper than StewMac. (I should point out that I do love StewMac for other stuff.)

Next a finer file followed by 150 grit then 320 grit.

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And here she be.
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I have to say that while sanding, I noticed some very strong grain standing out. To the point that I began to think my poplar might be green pine! Next time, I'll use maple.

My eyes aren't what they used to be so to help me out, I use some of Nosmo's idiot tape on the tap to label it before putting away.
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mPacT

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I decided to make my knob look like Brazilian rosewood for some reason. I probably should have pore filled it first, but I kind of liked the texture. And that's the story I'm sticking with!

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Now guys, a word about safety. I work with dangerous chemicals through my work. Some stuff we use for guitar building is toxic! Especially some of the stains. Use in a well ventilated area (like a garage with a fan blowing across you), wear gloves- I like nitrile, and ideally, wear a respirator with "organic vapor" rated filters. This will give you the best lung protection. I have known far too many people that took protecting their health lightly and paid for it. Your exposure will be accumulative over time so be careful! Also, that respirator set up is good for spraying finishes as well.

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I mixed up equal drops of ColorTone Red Mahogany and Tobacco Brown into a 1/4 ounce of Everclear grain alcohol to get a warm brown. I like the grain alcohol instead of denatured alcohol because it doesn't give me a headache. Then applied it with a Q-tip. A couple coats then I let it dry.
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I lightly sanded the wood with 320 grit, making sure to leave those low, darker spots. I repeated this and then sprayed it with Shellac. I do two or three "dust coats" followed by a good wet coat. I let this dry and repeated the wet coat. I gave it a good shellacking! Ahem. . .
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When it dried, I lightly scuffed it again with 320 grit to knock off any high spots from the shellac.

Then I hit it with some paste wax and tung oil.
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My next post will be the final details and it is done!
 
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mPacT

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Don't you sleep??

And why do you measure the bottom of the tap?

NO!

We are building a fighting force of extraordinary magnitude. We forge our spirits in the tradition of our ancestors. You have our gratitude.

That's the answer to the tap question. It's also from Kentucky Fried Movie.

Actually, I do it because I find when I tap delrin, it works better to start with that measurement for determining what drill bit to use. Then again, I am probably crazy.

And there it is... awesome work... get some sleep!

NEVER!!! I have too much knobification to achieve! (Thanks brother Chris!)
 




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