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Enhance grain without filler?

Discussion in 'Finely Finished' started by SixDemonBag, Jan 22, 2021.

  1. SixDemonBag

    SixDemonBag TDPRI Member

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    Hi, just seeing how you achieve this finish? Where the dark grain is accentuated, but the rest isn’t dyed. Plus the pores don’t seem filled?

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  2. old wrench

    old wrench Friend of Leo's

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    You could dye or stain and then sand the surface back, leaving the darker finish in the places with the heavier graining.

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  3. SixDemonBag

    SixDemonBag TDPRI Member

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    Would I have to seal before dying, in order for the dye not to seep too much into the wood
     
  4. andy__d

    andy__d TDPRI Member

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    (Removed)
     
    Last edited: Jan 24, 2021
  5. old wrench

    old wrench Friend of Leo's

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    That is a great question :).


    There are two schools of thought regarding sealing before dye or stain. Dye in particular.

    One school holds that sealing is necessary to control the way the color penetrates the surface. Advocates say it's necessary because it gives you more opportunity and time to pull back the color if it is getting too intense in places and will give you a more even and consistent look.

    The other school says that sealer doesn't allow the color to fully penetrate the wood and bring out it's maximum vibrancy and highlights. You can always start out with a diluted dye solution, and then if necessary, give it another coat or mix the solution stronger and more intense.

    I think many of the terms used when talking about finishing are somewhat subjective and open to some individual interpretation. But, no one can really argue with results. The results are objective and speak for themselves.



    The best possible way to find out for yourself is to experiment with scraps and samples of the same type of wood as you plan on finishing.

    If you keep a log of the strength of the dye or stain and the sequence you follow when applying it, along with marking the sample pieces, it really helps. I've tricked myself by not doing that!

    The best pieces, that will give the truest results, would be scraps or drop-offs from the blank you are using.



    It looks like most of what I typed is the equivalent of "hot air" ;), but the part about doing up sample pieces is the best advice I can offer.

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  6. SixDemonBag

    SixDemonBag TDPRI Member

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    Thanks Old wrench, I appreciate the time you spent with your response. Totally understand that there in no ‘one’ solution to all these problems!

    I think I’ll got with a diluted dye, light sand, then go with the final coat (sans undercoat) as I want the finish to sink into the grain. A really ‘thin’ skin finish
     
    old wrench likes this.
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