English accents

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by johnny k, Feb 26, 2020.

  1. maxvintage

    maxvintage Friend of Leo's

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    I once read a historical paper that was partly showing that Americans kept writing about the Beatles charming, "posh upper class accents." Americans have a reflexive tendency to hear a "british" accent of any kind as snooty and pompous. This will make zero sense to actual English people, and Americans are probably more savvy than they were in 1964, but it's still somewhat true
     
    Last edited: Feb 26, 2020
  2. maxvintage

    maxvintage Friend of Leo's

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    Also I've spent a fair amount of time in Ireland and I usually do fine except in feckin' Cork.
     
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  3. nojazzhere

    nojazzhere Doctor of Teleocity

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    Although, I recall reading that Paul would affect a more "upper-class" accent at times, at which time John would lay on the "working-class" accent extra heavy, mocking Paul's pretentiousness. It could partially be due to Brian Epstein's posh accent rubbing off on Paul.
    Other than this, I agree with you completely. ;)
     
  4. Dan German

    Dan German Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    When I moved to Canada in 1970, asking for a "napkin" to wipe your mouth was pretty appalling.
     
  5. El Marin

    El Marin Tele-Afflicted

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    I remember when I started working in London as Geotechnical Engineer. I was making tunnels with welsh and scottish miners.
    Well, I was there for two weeks and one night I was sitting on a big stone inside the tunnel with my head between my hands and about to cry... Then a Friend from Canterbury comeas and ask:

    -Hey Rafa, what's the matter?
    -I am about to quit mate
    -Why mate?
    -I have been studing English since kindergarden, I have spent summers in Brighton, London, Dublin, I have travelled Ireland, UK and the USA and I haven't learnt anything I cannot understand the miners, I don't have a clue of wjat are they saying
    My friends starts laughin...
    -Me neither, they don't speak english!!! They speak welsh and gaelic!!!!

    There I smiled, laughed as well and went to the miners " You bastards, counts, SPEAK ENGLISH!!!"

    Then I leanrned some bad words in gaelic and welsh and used them a lot :lol:
     
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  6. wyclif

    wyclif Tele-Afflicted

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    I'm actually from the States, but the most mystifying accents to me are not English, Scots, Irish, or Welsh...but rather those found in Minnesota...

     
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  7. 24 track

    24 track Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

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    my uncle spoke welch gaelic with a scottish accent and he mumbled quietly, took me 10 days to to under stand him , then one day he and I sat down to a coversation and I finally got everything he was saying, an incredable man .
    correct me if I am wrong but welch gaelic is not a dialect based on French, German, English origin , I love to hear , the brogue as it spoken naturally.
     
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  8. 24 track

    24 track Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

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    My mother had a very strong Scott accent , she never lost it after years in canada , a beautiful thing ..
    one day we are crossing into washington state at the peace arch crossing the customs guard says are we all Canadain citizens and a unanimous yes feom every one in the car except for Mom who without skipping a beat says," Aye". we all cracked up laughing

    and when she met my now Wife she is relating a story about an incident with one of her neighbours my wife could only reply "thats nice" to everything Mom said ( she did not have aclue about anything Mom said, my Mom stops cold mid sentence and says "Thats No Nice,....He died", Ms 24 did not have aclue what she was saying , I still give her a bad time about it today
     
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  9. Bristlehound

    Bristlehound Friend of Leo's

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    It is based on European languages, but split off and went its own way a long time ago.

    The history of the Welsh language
    Welsh (Cymraeg) is the oldest language in Britain dating back possibly 4,000 years.

    The majority of European languages, including Welsh, evolved from a language now called Indo-European, which developed into nine different language groups, one of which was Celtic. In turn, Celtic developed its own family of languages.

    Before the coming of the Roman empire, Celtic languages were spoken across Europe.

    The Celtic languages that survived are those that migrated from mainland Europe to the western islands of Britain and Ireland. Labelled Insular to differentiate them from the Continental European languages, the versions of Celtic on these western islands developed into two branches.

    In Ireland, Goidelic - or Q-Celtic, thanks to its characteristic kw sound - became the dominant language and gave rise to Irish, Scots Gaelic and Manx.

    Most historians date the arrival of the Celtic language in Britain to around 600BC. This version of Celtic was to evolve into Brittonic (or Brythonic), which in turn gave rise to Welsh, Cornish and Breton.
     
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  10. 24 track

    24 track Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

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    excellant, Thank You for that I suspected that its origins were very different than the root european languages becuase the were no parrallel , and seamed to have its own liguistic structure
     
  11. Bristlehound

    Bristlehound Friend of Leo's

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    The real mystery language in Europe is Basque. The Basque region straddles the Western Pyrenees mountains either side of the boarder between France and Spain and really would like independence... even resorting to violence at times. I'll leave you to follow it up if you want.

    Wiki: Basque has been considered the last remnant of a wider, Western European linguistic stratum before Indo-European languages arrived in the area during the Iron Age.
     
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  12. esseff

    esseff Tele-Holic

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    Probably because the comparatively small size of the UK makes it possible to travel anywhere within its boundaries very quickly and hear local accents. Plus the people we work and socialise with could commonly be from any of its 100 counties.
     
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  13. HoodieMcFoodie

    HoodieMcFoodie Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Yeah I know right. Lucy is raking in a whole $5 per month through her Patreon alone!!!!
     
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  14. TokyoPortrait

    TokyoPortrait Tele-Afflicted

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    Argh! Too weird!!! I’m reading through the thread and was just thinking of asking that.

    I heard (well, Stephen Fry said on QI) that he had to stay in the accent the whole day of filming, or he couldn’t get back into it.

    Pax/
    Dean
     
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  15. AndrewG

    AndrewG Friend of Leo's

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    I'm a Londoner originally but moved 200 miles West to Devon some 30 years ago. I notice quite a similarity between West Country accents (there are more than a few, even within a 60 mile radius), and some American accents. This can't be a coincidence seeing as we exported a bunch of Devonians to America from Plymouth a few hundred years ago. My family was Polish and I'm bilingual; Polish has to be one of the hardest languages to master. 'Chszczeszcz brzmi w czcynie'. Try that!
    Here's a lesson in Devonshire...

     
    Last edited: Feb 27, 2020
  16. Teletubbie

    Teletubbie TDPRI Member Gold Supporter

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    Quite right, Mrs Tubbie [NEVER tell her I call her that] and her are old friends, both north London Cypriots who worked together in theatre many years ago.
     
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  17. Teletubbie

    Teletubbie TDPRI Member Gold Supporter

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    BTW, being Mancunian, I'm possibly the only person on this thread that talks proper.
    :rolleyes:
     
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  18. uriah1

    uriah1 Telefied Gold Supporter

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    Last edited: Feb 27, 2020
  19. Si G X

    Si G X Tele-Holic

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    Yeah, I do a lot ..... edge for hedge, it used to really annoy my Nan. :D

    "you appy with that?"
     
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  20. Bristlehound

    Bristlehound Friend of Leo's

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    It's the "T" dropping at the end of words I dislike.

    "you happy with tha?"

    Add the "H" dropping to the "T" dropping and... to quote the singer in a previous band...

    Him: "I've go' yer a"
    Me: "errr... sorry, what?"
    Him: "I've go' yer a" (just said louder, which is what 'we' do when someone can't understand - we repeat exactly the same thing but louder 'cos that's bound to help!!)

    Translation: I've got your hat.:rolleyes:
     
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