English accents

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by johnny k, Feb 26, 2020.

  1. Ricky D.

    Ricky D. Doctor of Teleocity

    Age:
    69
    Posts:
    10,880
    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2006
    Location:
    Raleigh, North Carolina
    I sat next to two guys in a cafe in a small town in South Carolina eating breakfast. Half an hour, could not understand a word. :)
     
    uriah1 likes this.
  2. Lonn

    Lonn Friend of Leo's

    Age:
    58
    Posts:
    4,011
    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2007
    Location:
    Indiana
    When I moved to London in the 70s I had to watch TV and listen to the radio for a month before I had the nerve to speak to a local.
     
  3. ClashCityTele

    ClashCityTele Tele-Afflicted

    Age:
    58
    Posts:
    1,592
    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2018
    Location:
    Washington, UK
    Don't mess with Vinnie Jones!!!
     
    Si G X likes this.
  4. Steerforth

    Steerforth Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    3,186
    Joined:
    May 17, 2009
    Location:
    Arkansas
    Keanu Reeves as Jonathan Harker in Dracula?

    I grew up in the northern end of Appalachia.

    Even though I’m not a hillbilly in the strictest sense of the word, not being Scots-Irish, I can switch from my normal way of speaking to full tilt backwoods Appalachian hillbilly in an instant.

    This used to allow me to speak to Mrs. Steerforth for long durations without her understanding a word that I said.

    However, she’s a quick learner and it didn’t take her long to learn. So that doesn’t work as well anymore.

    Her conclusion after all that was that people from Appalachia take great delight in playing with words and creatively butchering the English language. I think she’s on to us.
     
  5. Norris Vulcan

    Norris Vulcan Tele-Afflicted

    Posts:
    1,106
    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2015
    Location:
    Somerset, UK
     
  6. Dan German

    Dan German Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

    Posts:
    9,620
    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2008
    Location:
    Left of the Left Coast
    Well, technically, “kar-ki” is the correct pronunciation.

    Never watched it. There is a fairly generic “American” way of speaking that any good actor can adopt. It’s non-regional, and preferred in things like broadcast news. When things go bad is when an actor with insufficient skill tries to go regional. Re: my example of The Walking Dead, there is no reason why that character had to sound like he grew up in that Georgia town. He could have just sounded “American”. Vast numbers of Americans do not live where they grew up.

    I moved around a bunch as a kid, ending up in Canada. When I first moved here, I had a Midwest corks in the nose twang (raaahk, waaahk claaahk instead of rock, walk, clock). That ended badly. I also moved a lot after leaving school. Now, I’m very generic North American, with random regional expressions thrown in. (If I say “y’all” it’s time to cut off my beer. Thanks, Oklahoma.) I was once discussing this with my sister, who has lived exclusively in Manitoba since the early ‘70s. She said “yah, I know, it’s da same with me, eh?” Without a hint of irony.
     
    EsquireBoy likes this.
  7. BigDaddyLH

    BigDaddyLH Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    54,394
    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2009
    Location:
    Kelowna, BC, Canuckistan
    90% of people don't think *they* are the one with the accent :confused:
     
    Steerforth likes this.
  8. nojazzhere

    nojazzhere Doctor of Teleocity

    Age:
    68
    Posts:
    12,979
    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2017
    Location:
    Foat Wuth, Texas
    Yeah, I should have elaborated.....the "survey" or "poll" asked Americans to judge the voices. I understand the "Brits" have much better ears for accents and dialects, and where they come from. Most Americans (especially when this study was conducted) often think almost ANY English accent is "posh". Possibly not a "hard core" Cockney, but when Americans hear anyone from the UK, they immediately think of tea and crumpets with the Queen.
     
    Si G X likes this.
  9. RoyBGood

    RoyBGood Doctor of Teleocity

    Posts:
    12,625
    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2012
    Location:
    Northamptonshire, UK
    Terrible, imo. His performance is fine otherwise. The producer's motive for not letting him use his normal 'non-regional' (easy for all to understand) accent is most puzzling. Just try deciphering pretty much anything Cameron says without subtitles!
     
    nojazzhere and EsquireBoy like this.
  10. BigDaddyLH

    BigDaddyLH Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    54,394
    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2009
    Location:
    Kelowna, BC, Canuckistan
    There was a cartoon series in the british newspaper, The Independent, I think it was called Nigel, about a self-centred yuppie. In one cartoon he was crowing about how he hired a french nanny for their young son, but he immediately regretted it because she taught the boy to say "serviette" -- that's a correct word in French, but to hyper-class-conscience Nigel, "serviette" was working-class whilst "napkin" was middle-class.
     
    Last edited: Feb 26, 2020
    nojazzhere likes this.
  11. aging_rocker

    aging_rocker Tele-Afflicted

    Posts:
    1,083
    Joined:
    May 8, 2019
    Location:
    The upsidedown
    It took most of us Brits a while to realise that was supposed to be an English accent...

    But the top award still goes to Dick Van Dyke for Mary Poppins. That accent caused a deep rift in Anglo-American relations for decades.
     
    Clive Hugh, beagle, Antmax and 7 others like this.
  12. RoyBGood

    RoyBGood Doctor of Teleocity

    Posts:
    12,625
    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2012
    Location:
    Northamptonshire, UK
    ...Closely followed by Jane Leeves' utterly ridiculous Manchester (!) accent as Daphne in 'Frasier'?
     
  13. Bristlehound

    Bristlehound Friend of Leo's

    Age:
    60
    Posts:
    3,170
    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2017
    Location:
    Wales
    I think we got pay-back with Tom Wilkinson's American accent in Batman Begins. That was cringeworthy... and he's such a good actor, too. Egregious miscasting if there ever was.
     
    nojazzhere and aging_rocker like this.
  14. Bristlehound

    Bristlehound Friend of Leo's

    Age:
    60
    Posts:
    3,170
    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2017
    Location:
    Wales
    Harumph... double post!
     
  15. Steerforth

    Steerforth Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    3,186
    Joined:
    May 17, 2009
    Location:
    Arkansas
    I used to say napkin. Now I say serviette. It was decreed from on high that it must be so, shortly after I met Mrs. Steerforth, LOL! Madame does not like the word napkin.
     
  16. Uncle Daddy

    Uncle Daddy Tele-Afflicted

    Posts:
    1,388
    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2015
    Location:
    Maldon, England
    This one might surprise all y'all. Marina is a proppa Landanah.

     
    aging_rocker likes this.
  17. BigDaddyLH

    BigDaddyLH Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    54,394
    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2009
    Location:
    Kelowna, BC, Canuckistan
    Tell her napkin is more posh.
     
  18. Steerforth

    Steerforth Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    3,186
    Joined:
    May 17, 2009
    Location:
    Arkansas
    LOL! I don’t think that I’d survive the ensuing debate. :lol:
     
  19. Uncle Daddy

    Uncle Daddy Tele-Afflicted

    Posts:
    1,388
    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2015
    Location:
    Maldon, England

    Drusilla and Spoike spring to mind!
     
    nojazzhere likes this.
  20. Si G X

    Si G X Tele-Afflicted

    Posts:
    1,071
    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2019
    Location:
    England
    If you use a napkin or serviette, you are posh...

    peasants like me use "a sheet of kitchen roll" :D
     
    beagle likes this.
IMPORTANT: Treat everyone here with respect, no matter how difficult!
No sex, drug, political, religion or hate discussion permitted here.