Emotional soloing in E phrygian?

Discussion in 'Tab, Tips, Theory and Technique' started by Almostflawed, May 3, 2019.

  1. Almostflawed

    Almostflawed TDPRI Member

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    Hey guys I got a song that goes in a minor but for the bridge and solo section it starts at e phrygian and then moves to a minor in the second half. When it goes to the second half I have no problem soloing over it but with the first half it's kind of weird maybe you guys can help me with the chord progression to make something cool or give me some examples of something that had been in this chord progression. It's 3/4 btw

    Section A (E phry)
    ii - - III i i i i
    Vi - III iv i i i i
    Or basically

    F F F G e e e e
    C C G a e e e e
     
  2. jbmando

    jbmando Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    Since E Phrygian is the same notes as C major, maybe you could work around the C major scale for the first half. Land on chord tones if you can, such as F, A and C, then G, B, and D, then Em pent for the Em chord.
     
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  3. 1300 E Valencia

    1300 E Valencia Friend of Leo's

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    "Malaguena"
     
  4. Larry F

    Larry F Doctor of Teleocity Vendor Member

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    Not to quibble, but for my own understanding, should ii be II instead?
     
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  5. ASATKat

    ASATKat Tele-Afflicted

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    I see it a totally different way,

    F is the IV, G is V7, and Em is a special case, yes phrygian looks obvious but the F and G wants to go natually to C. Making a classic IV V I progression. It all works better when we add the 7th note to these chords.

    Thinking of Em7 as a Cmaj7 opens it up to a whole lot of familiar solo areas.

    Since this is the theory hub I'll explain why it works,

    Start with the C major scale,
    C D E F G A B C

    The magic happens when you put these seven notes in an order of 3rds.
    C E G B D F A C
    "Every Good Boy Does Fine Always 'Cause


    See how this just goes on for ever?
    C E G B D F A C E G B D F A C E G B etc.

    To explain how Em works as a C chord we'll use only this much of the 3rds chain,
    A C E G B,,,

    See how the three chords share their notes?
    The Am7 chord notes are A C E G
    The Cmaj7 chord notes are C E G B
    The Em7 chord notes are E G B D

    Because of these shared notes we can play 3 exotic types of C chords,

    Em7 makes a Cmaj9 without the C.
    Am7 makes a Cmaj6 with the C root.

    Playing Am7 is a substitute for Cmaj6
    Playing Cmaj6 is a sub for Am7
    Playing Em7 subs for Cmaj9
    Playing Cmaj9 subs for Em7
    - Em7 and Am7 do not sub for each other.

    Finally, a cool way to play over the progression would be to use the A minor pentatonic, the D minor pent, and the E minor pent, all three pents together gives us all the notes if the C major scale, but playing the C scale by way of these three pents is very beautiful and inspiring. I use it all the time in my playing. And because they're pents most of us have many rock blues licks, aka AC/DC or sweet, like a more country ballad sound. So all of that is found in those three pents.
     
    Last edited: May 3, 2019
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  6. kbold

    kbold Tele-Meister Silver Supporter

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    Second half is similar to Pachelbel - Canon in D (except you've transposed to C, and he used 4:4 time)
    Listening to Pachelbels canon may help.
    Both A Minor and E Phrygian are the same scale pattern (C major scale), but with different root notes (A and E respectively). Em pentatonic is also embedded in C Major scale.

    Regarding the first half, I would consider changing the last chord Em to something that helps transition to the C chord. Perhaps G7 or Dm7. Transitioning with F was an obvious choice, but I think G7 is a little more colorful/interesting.

    Pachelbel transitioned with A7 (your G7).
    Pachelbels chord progression: D A Bm F#m G D G A7
    (Transposing to the key of C would be: C G Am Em F C F G7)

    I would finish the song on an Am or C chord. One of these will work better than the other.
    It will also indicate whether the song is in the key of Am or C.
     
  7. Tomm Williams

    Tomm Williams Tele-Holic

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    I always try to read threads like this to see what I can learn but dang you guys know some stuff ! Theory will likely be an abstract subject to me for a long time.
    Yes I know it follows established formulas, but the ability of some people to just spit it out boggles my mind.
     
  8. kbold

    kbold Tele-Meister Silver Supporter

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    And the Vi should be a VI, but I guess that's pedantic quibbling.
     
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  9. Larry F

    Larry F Doctor of Teleocity Vendor Member

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    I think that it is good for our theory threads to contain completely factual and standard terminology and notation. I get a little disheartened about how much incorrect info is in these rudimentary concepts. I suppose that one could glean the correct/best answer by reading what everybody wrote.
     
  10. kbold

    kbold Tele-Meister Silver Supporter

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    It's good to see that everyone was gleaning in the same direction
     
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