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Elvis vs Declan Patrick Aloysius Macmanus

Discussion in 'Music to Your Ears' started by blowtorch, Mar 1, 2021.

  1. Dan R

    Dan R Poster Extraordinaire

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    Love Elvis Costello. At what he does, he has no equal. It makes me laugh when people bring up his misdeeds of the past. That's part of what makes people famous. I don't expect rock stars to be angels. Long live Elvis!!!
     
  2. StrangerNY

    StrangerNY Friend of Leo's Gold Supporter

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    Sinatra.

    - D
     
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  3. buster poser

    buster poser Friend of Leo's Platinum Supporter

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    Yeah, that's true. Didn't have the youth losing their minds quite as much, wasn't really at the forefront of a new genre, but you are right. Fairly well known in the early 50s. ;)
     
  4. jamesepowell

    jamesepowell Tele-Holic

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  5. jamesepowell

    jamesepowell Tele-Holic

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    I remember that well. I was at Ohio State at the time and saw the Costello show - pretty sure it was at the Agora. He sucked. He had that scorn for the audience that was kind of fashionable at the time with punk bands. The story about the Bramlett incident didn't come out for a week or so, if memory serves.

    The combination of reading about that and the fact that he sucked when I saw him meant I didn't bother to see him in concert till the 90s in Cleveland. I still bought the albums, though. It was good stuff.

    Costello has said - I believe more than once - that he is sorry for the incident.
     
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  6. StrangerNY

    StrangerNY Friend of Leo's Gold Supporter

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    No, there most definitely was hysteria around Sinatra.

    " On December 30,1942, when Sinatra played his first solo concert at New York city’s Paramount Theater near Times Square, the Bobbysoxers came out in droves. After being introduced by Jack Benny, Sinatra walked on stage to loud and continuous shrieks and screams. “The sound that greeted me,” he later recalled, “was absolutely deafening. It was a tremendous roar. Five thousand kids, stamping, yelling, screaming, applauding. I was scared stiff. I couldn’t move a muscle. [Band leader] Benny Goodman froze, too. He was so scared he turned around, looked at the audience and said, ‘What the hell is that?’ I burst out laughing.” The kids screamed in delight; some even fainted. They also crowded the back stage door after the show shrieking for his autograph, and spilled over into Times Square, snarling traffic. Sinatra by then had become a recording sensation. He was so popular at the Paramount, that his engagement there was extended to February 1943. He played the Paramount for nearly four solid weeks, first with Goodman and then an orchestra led by Johnny Long.

    "Between 1940 and early 1943 he had 23 top ten singles on the new Billboard music chart. And all through those years, back at Paramount and other venues, the kids continued screaming and swooning for Sinatra.

    “In various manifestations, this sort of thing has been going on all over America the last few months,” wrote one Time reporter who had observed Sinatra’s screaming kids at a July 1943 Paramount performance. “Not since the days of Rudolph Valentino has American womanhood made such unabashed public love to an entertainer.” Fans had not swooned or screamed over other singers, such as Bing Crosby. So what was it with Sinatra? Something else was going on, the critics surmised. Although his singing was certainly a factor, some charged it was also Sinatra’s look; his seeming innocence, frailty, and vulnerability that evoked the passions of female fans. Newsweek magazine then viewed the Bobbysoxer phenomenon as a kind of madness; a mass sexual delirium. Some even called the girls immoral or juvenile delinquents. But most simply saw them as young girls letting their emotions fly. Still, Sinatra fan clubs were cropping up all over America, and not just among teenagers; 40 year-old women were enlisting too."

    - D
     
  7. Mike M

    Mike M Tele-Holic

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    Some of that "hysteria" was manufactured by his PR people , and some of the girls were paid to freak out, but yeah it did happen.

    He is only one of handful of artists in the 20th century (Chaplin, Sinatra, Elvis, Beatles, Michael Jackson) to experience that kind of popular mass hysteria.
     
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  8. blowtorch

    blowtorch Telefied Ad Free Member

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    No room whatsoever
     
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  9. buster poser

    buster poser Friend of Leo's Platinum Supporter

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    Dang, wow. Had no idea. Thanks for setting me straight.
     
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  10. StrangerNY

    StrangerNY Friend of Leo's Gold Supporter

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    That whole article I quoted is worth the read. It got to the point where girls would go to a show and refuse to leave when it was over because Sinatra would do multiple sets per day. Crazy.

    It may have been drummed up at the outset, but it definitely took on a life of its own after a while.

    - D
     
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  11. Mike M

    Mike M Tele-Holic

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    The rise of the singer as star, is a fascinating 20th century development, mostly do to the invention of the electric microphone.

    Singers in bands in the 1920's started as almost an afterthought, a way to give the horn players a break for a couple of stanzas. That all changed with Crosby, Holiday, Sinatra.

    With Holiday in the beginning, the mid 30's, she is only taking a measure or two during the song, like any other musician. By the late 30's, the whole performance of the song is centered around the singer.

    With the eclectic microphone, a band could be blaring, and the singer could be intimately whispering in your ear, and still be heard. The emotional connection that provided was astonishing.
     
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  12. peteycaster

    peteycaster Tele-Holic Silver Supporter

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    The two Elvis's are completely different artists from different ears. I don't get why they're being compared. DPAM has written many songs and with many different people over many different genre's with many different musicians (James Burton among them who had no problem with both Elvis's).

    Here's some of his collaboration with Burt Baccarach with whom he did a whole album.

     
  13. Manual Slim

    Manual Slim Friend of Leo's

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    I’d rather hear Davies read recipes than hear most EC tunes but are they really in the same generation? The Kinks put in a lot of work before he even sniffed a record deal.
     
  14. blowtorch

    blowtorch Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Ask declan blahblahblah. (You know, the guy who decided to call hisself Elvis, who clearly isn't :))
     
  15. bsman

    bsman Friend of Leo's

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    Man, you've got quite the hardon for Costello.


    upload_2021-3-1_14-35-39.jpeg
     
  16. blowtorch

    blowtorch Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I'm just saying that Ray Davies is the greatest songwriter of all time.


    Bar none.
     
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  17. Manual Slim

    Manual Slim Friend of Leo's

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    I wouldn’t try to dispute that.
     
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  18. posttoastie

    posttoastie Tele-Afflicted

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  19. blowtorch

    blowtorch Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Dino, too
     
  20. black_doug

    black_doug Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    Never was a fan of Declan either.

    From that era, I'd rather listen to Joe Jackson any day of the week.
     
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