Edges/Corners not getting Clearcoat layers protection

Discussion in 'Finely Finished' started by mjp808, May 18, 2021.

  1. mjp808

    mjp808 TDPRI Member

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    Not the best title, sorry...

    So, after MANY coats of Rustoleum Ultracover 2x on my Warmoth maple/rosewood neck, it's shying away from corners and edges, accumulating in reverse areas. I'd really like the edges nice and protected from dings. I'd like to protect the entire neck with a nice even hard clear satin shell.

    My instinct is to take a smallish brush and go around all the edges for a few coats until a consistent layer is built up, then sand even with the existing clearcoat. Would that do it?

    I've been heating up the spray can in hot water--good or bad for this type application? It smooths out the paint but does thin it also.

    Any suggestions/advice or experience with this issue?

    I also have the tempting option of sending it to a guy with experience who, for a very fair price, will strip it down and clearcoat it the correct way, but Id have to reprint and hand paint silver my faux Fender waterslide decal again.

    Thanks mahalo dudes
     
  2. Telekarster

    Telekarster Tele-Afflicted

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    Yeah.... I've seen this happen before on other things. I think it has something to do with thiness of the product perhaps. It wicks away from edges... seems to me that the only way I found to deal with this was to use gravity as a tool i.e. flip it to a side where the edge points downward and thereby forcing it to the edges via gravity? Have you tried this yet? Just throwing something out there...
     
  3. _MementoMori_

    _MementoMori_ Tele-Afflicted

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    Nice try, Big Brother.
    If I spent the money on a Warmoth body and wanted the finish to be factory-perfect, I'd send it out in a heartbeat. I was okay with DIY grade finishing when I built mine because I was going for a rustic finished product. I'd never trust myself to create a factory quality finish.
     
  4. Danb541

    Danb541 Friend of Leo's

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    Lots of very light coats so it doesn't have time to settle
     
  5. mjp808

    mjp808 TDPRI Member

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    Yeah, I'm pretty close to sending to someone. Even with my inexperience though, I have to say, it doesn't look too bad. Just this edge-wicking problem.

    I thought before I spend the $100 I'd run it by the forum, see if spot painting the edges would work.

    I'm also not going for a factory look, more of a punk rock/military vehicle aesthetic, although I do want the neck kinda factory, with satin/matte finish. The body is where I'm going for a worn stressed look. Most important, I want everything as dind proof as possible.
     
    Last edited: May 18, 2021
  6. RickyRicardo

    RickyRicardo Friend of Leo's

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    Sorry to say it but Rustoleum is not the nest finish to be using on a guitar. I know some of you out there have but in a lot of posts on this and other forums there are stories like yours. It doesn't cure for months etc. I'd sand it off and get it finished properly.
     
  7. oldunc

    oldunc Tele-Holic

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    Not sure how applicable it is here, but the general wisdom with finishing (and sanding) is that if you concentrate on the edges the middle will take care of itself.
     
  8. stratisfied

    stratisfied Tele-Holic

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    Rustoleum? Isn't that an acrylic enamel? You won't be able to wet sand any flaws out and buff it. What you get out of the can finish-wise when sprayed is what you are stuck with. On a neck or small surface, it isn't so critical as you don't have a large, flat surface to reflect any flaws.

    Normally, you "break" the sharp edges by sanding lightly to minimize the paint thinning at a sharp edge. As others have said, build the edges up first with multiple light coats, allowing drying time in between coats and then spray it all with a "wet" coat.
     
  9. old wrench

    old wrench Friend of Leo's

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    There is a natural tendency for a finish to pull back from edges and corners as it dries, it has to do with surface tension.

    The sharper the corner or edge, the more pronounced the effect.

    You can help to compensate for this by the way you apply the finish.

    It's just a part of the learning process with finishes :).




    edit: I don't think hand-brushing the edges is going to get you where you want to be.

    I'm not real familiar with UltraCover 2x, but I think that applying light coats along the edges will build the finish up to an acceptable level.

    Getting a really fine finish is harder than it seems like it should be ;).

    I've found that I can read up on it and gather as many technical facts as I can, but to get good results it takes lots and lots of actual practice :).

    .
     
    Last edited: May 18, 2021
    eallen likes this.
  10. mjp808

    mjp808 TDPRI Member

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    Thanks guys
     
  11. Sea Devil

    Sea Devil Friend of Leo's

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    That's a bad choice of finish, IMO. I'd take it off.

    No finish can really prevent dings. Lacquer and oil finishes are the easiest to repair if you get any damage. I'd use one of those.
     
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