Eddie VanHalen is a freak of nature. That is all.

Discussion in 'Music to Your Ears' started by Jupiter, Nov 2, 2015.

  1. Walker

    Walker Tele-Afflicted

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    I was in high school when Van Halen hit. Eddie's playing really blew away all the guitarists. A keyboard playing friend of mine said, I can't tell if he's a genius or just insane.

    While I was a huge Van Halen fan and learned a bunch of Van Halen songs, I purposely didn't learn his solos. There were way too many clones out there doing that and I always felt that the solo part of a song was where a guitarist should speak in his own voice.
     
  2. thunderbyrd

    thunderbyrd Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    you know, i've thought about this lately. if keith richards doesn't belong on the list with chuck berry, jimi, and EVH, he needs to get a highly ranked honorable mention, at least, for his influence on guitar rock.

    the 1st thing you might think is "sure, "Satisfaction" invented a whole new type of riff-driven rock." and it did, IMO. but there's more to it: i would encourage you to consider another landmark guitar moment from keith that doesn't ever get mentioned, the song "stray cat blues" from beggar's banquet, 1968. i believe this song is a blueprint for a lot of chunky '70's guitar rock, aerosmith to ted nugent to kiss to bad company to foreigner and on and on.

    Stray cat is a song with not a lot of precedent, it seems to me. or maybe rather, with tons of precedent but never put together in this same sort of way.

    anyhow, i can't express it all that well, but i think this song was a landmark moment that's been overlooked. i think johnny winter saw it, too.
     
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  3. harley2008

    harley2008 Former Member

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    EVH changed rock guitar forever, regardless of your age at the time, etc. I don't listen to VH much, almost not at all these days, but whenever I do his raw ability absolutely kills me.

    Mostly I think about him playing the most ungodly difficult stuff flawlessly, all the while smiling at the crowd and chewing gum like "Geez, this is really no big deal."
     
  4. Steve_U1S

    Steve_U1S Tele-Afflicted Ad Free Member

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    My first love in the guitar world was the Telecaster and the players that were introduced to me who favoured the Tele by my father - most notably, Waylon.
    I built a Wayloncaster early on.
    ... next thing I built was a 'replica' of Ed's Baby.

    From Ed I absorbed some important things; a willingness to be 'reckless' while trying to 'stick the landing' in playing, to embrace a real 'swing' with the music... and then there's the recklessness when it comes to building/modifying gear to make it work more to my liking in both big and small ways.
    He had a lot to do with my formative years of delving into rock playing.
     
  5. gee.

    gee. Tele-Meister

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    WRONG! Completely missed the mark. I'm not sure what you've listened to. I'll throw out "Hot For Teacher" right off the top. Just as cool and complimentary as the others you mentioned. And finger tapping and that's about it? The guy single-handedly propped up guitar throughout the 80s. We're still swimming in his parts-caster wake 30 plus years later.
     
  6. TMoxness

    TMoxness Tele-Meister

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    Eddie turned 60 this year. Your info shows you to be 56, so you're actually younger than Eddie. :D
     
    Last edited: Nov 4, 2015
  7. Leep Dog

    Leep Dog Tele-Afflicted

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    When VH came out I was just a little baby. I remember loving VH when I was little. Jump, Panama, and Hot For Teacher were great. In fact the Hot For Teacher video was one of the first times I remember my little hormones starting going crazy. Those teachers were nice.

    I started playing guitar when I was 15 or 16 (around 1990) and I remember buying the first VH tape and hearing Eruption and my eyes widening, my jaw dropping, and my goosebumps rising. Everything about that album was just amazing. I have often thought what it must have been like to hear that when it first came out. I was blown away over a decade after it was released; I can't imagine hearing it around 78.

    I have always loved Eddie's playing but I despise what he inspired, for the most part. Soul-less shredding is not my thing at all.
     
  8. thunderbyrd

    thunderbyrd Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    true. but there are different forms of "aging".
     
  9. Frank'n'censed

    Frank'n'censed Doctor of Teleocity

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    I was just graduating high school when Van Halen came out. My guitarist buddy's & I had this anti-disco/punk/new wave paranoia, inevitably evolving into Blues N*zis. Anything new in popular music was under investigation, including the new guitar god, Eddie Van Halen. Recalling going to their concert, a few years later, refusing to stand, out of dopey, pigheaded arrogance, visually missing the entire show! I couldn't tell them that when I first heard "You Really Got Me", in '78, blasting from a shopping mall record store, it was Very Impressive! Or that when I visited Fort Lauderdale in early '82, hearing "Pretty Woman", at the beach was the bomb! It wasn't until "1985", that I finally woke up. At that time, I also befriended another guitarist, a classically trained Van Halen-Rhodes scholar. During high school, he learned "Eruption" by ear, later becoming an award winning studio musician. Yah, Eddie changed the game, whether guy's like me wanna admit it or not!
     
  10. fraser

    fraser Tele-Holic

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    i guess i got turned onto van halen shortley after the second album came out-
    i wouldve been like 8 yrs old.
    an older cousin got me into them-
    along with sabbath and purple and zeppelin.
    i wasnt playing guitar then, but those bands turned me onto playing guitar.
    by the time other guys at school were all trying to play like eddie,
    i was into srv's texas flood album.
    srv was not cool enough for my guitar buddies at the time-

    i always felt that eddie was a great player, of course.
    i just felt his lead playing was a bit over the top.
    and other guys afterwards took it into places i cant bear to listen too.

    listening to the first 4 van halen albums now,
    (i cant stomach any of the cheese they created after 1982 lol)
    what strikes me most about eddies playing is in the way his guitar holds the tunes together.
    he is playing rhythm parts,
    but in a very interesting way-
    he holds the rhythm down without simply chugging away at chords.
    very intricate and tasteful, serving the song perfectly,
    but still managing to sound as if he is just on the edge of busting loose.

    does that make sense?
    :neutral:
     
  11. Frank'n'censed

    Frank'n'censed Doctor of Teleocity

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    Cool point...I used to work with a guy who cited Eddie as his favourite rhythm guitarist.
     
  12. Leep Dog

    Leep Dog Tele-Afflicted

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    Yes, it makes sense. I always got the sense he was just going for it once the tape rolled and that he hadn't planned his parts out. It made it very exciting to listen to.
     
  13. drlucky

    drlucky Tele-Holic

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    I was a sophomore when the first VH album came out. It sounded like nothing else that was on the radio (Foreigner, Boston, Journey, Styx, Kansas); in fact, I remember thinking that it was almost punk in the stripped-down, high energy, snotty attitude, born-to-raise-hell way that it sounded. Also, that album flat SWUNG in comparison to the other hard rock bands of the day (Aerosmith excepted). No one at my school could figure out how Eddie was doing what he was doing: it was like he was from Mars. Later that year I saw VH open for Black Sabbath at Selland Arena. It was no contest...Sabbath looked absolutely awful in comparison. Saw VH one more time in '79, lost all interest when Sammy Hagar joined. As for whether or not I wanted to give up guitar when I heard Eddie...hey, I just kept on plugging away...doin' the best I could...
     
  14. ddhr

    ddhr Tele-Holic

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    For me, Eddie's playing is pure emotion flowing out. In a lot of ways, it reminds me of SRV. They could not hold it back. Amazing.
     
  15. Tom Coyle

    Tom Coyle Tele-Meister

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    I was 15 in 1978. 14 when the album came out in Feb. I had a stoner buddy that stayed up all night and slept 'till like 4 p.m. Consequently, he would hear new music that they typically didn't play until after midnight. He said, "You need to hear this new band Van Halen." I was blown away. And at 14, I could hear the extra nuances in the playing and tone that would come out when we played the album on his turntable with a magnetic cartridge vs. mine with a ceramic cartridge.(Who else knows what they are?). In March or April they came to the Masonic Temple in Detroit before most people knew who they were. I was 15, my buddy was 16 and barely had his driver's license. We took his mom's '78 Buick Lesabre downtown, drinking MD 20/20 and smoking a little weed. Everyone else was being directed to the various local parking lots, but being young, dumb, and stoned, we just drove around and parked in a nice empty open parking lot in the back of the Masonic Temple where we probably weren't supposed to be. After a little more partaking, we ambled over to some double doors at the back of the building that looked like a loading in dock of sorts. As we had a hand on the door handle, a black limo pulled up, and 4 dudes got out and went in the other set of double doors 10 feet down from us. After they went in, with our hand on the handle still, and in voices that probably resemble Beavis and Butthead, we said "Dude, I think that was Van Halen". Huh Huh, cool! Then we went inside and shared some more weed with our seat neighbors.

    I became too stoned and passed out during the warm up band, and woke up pretty sure I needed to puke. Being young and inexperienced, I wasn't 100%, but I was pretty sure. We were in the balcony, and as I walked down the stairs, I was concerned that I was going to tumble down and go over the relatively low balcony wall. So I sat down on my ass and scooted down one step at a time to the amusement of most of the other concert goers. I reached the restroom only to find a line behind every urinal 10 or 12 deep. I wasn't going to last much longer. And old guy (probably 20 LOL) recognized my condition, pushed everyone out of the way, and marched me to the front of the line while stating "this kid needs the urinal NOW!" I instantly let loose. I never saw that guy again to be able to thank him for his alertness, kindness and quick thinking.

    The only upside to that was that I learned that I wanted to see people play relatively sober, because watching two EVH's try to play guitar was impossible. I always stayed sober at concerts after that, mostly.




    Agreed


    Tom
     
    Last edited: Nov 5, 2015
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  16. Clint62

    Clint62 TDPRI Member

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    I think Frank Marino had an effect on EVH big time
     
  17. regularslinky

    regularslinky Tele-Afflicted

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    I had just started playing guitar when the first Van Halen album came out. I took it to my lesson and played Eruption for my teacher - who was a great local rock guitar player. I said "I don't expect to be able to learn this, but can you just tell me what this guy is doing?"

    He listened to it 3 or 4 times, shook his head and said "Man, I have no (blank)ing idea, but I can tell you for sure it's been speeded up in the studio. Nobody can really play like that."

    It took me a few years to realize that the tapping and whammy bar stuff was just the icing - Eddie was a monster all-around guitar player.
     
  18. Zepfan

    Zepfan Poster Extraordinaire

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    I really enjoy Van Halens latest CD "A Different Kind Of Truth". David actually sings some of the parts on the CD. Was very disappointed in their live performances of late. At least Sammy sings all the parts of songs when he performs and He's older than David. Wolfgang is a good bass player, but He's no Michael Anthony.
     
  19. beninma

    beninma Friend of Leo's

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    Not sure why anyone would be down on him about his solos.

    I was 2 when VH1 came out I guess. I kind of missed them as a kid. I only started playing guitar in my mid 30s.

    Just this week my teacher threw the 2nd VH song at me that I've worked on. The first was Running with the Devil, now this one is Ain't talkin bout love.

    I barely even hear the solos in these songs. The thing with EVH that blows me away is he's doing more stuff in his rhythm playing than lots of famous players did in their solos.

    Just in the rhythm..
    > 250 notes/minute
    pinch harmonics & pick slides and stuff in the rhythm
    Sometimes pinch harmonics combined with hammer ons and pull offs
    Chording & arpeggios mixed together
    Tons of palm muting technique mixed in at warp seed
    Amp gain turned up to the point every mistake is magnified 100x... even the slightest error in the palm muting throws off the tone tremendously.
     
  20. ndcaster

    ndcaster Poster Extraordinaire

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    I was 18 in 1984, right in the middle of Arena Rock

    EVH and VH were different because they weren't angry, they weren't metal nerds, and they weren't trying to be respectable in any way

    in short, they were fun

    and Eddie, smiling all the time, pulling stuff out of his a**, improvising, made guitar look FUN

    it was a party, and that in its way was inspiring
     
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