Eating porridge

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by Ribsspare, Feb 28, 2019.

  1. Ribsspare

    Ribsspare Tele-Meister

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    I’ve been eating porridge. I first heard of porridge when I was 6 years old from the Goldilocks and the three Bears story. But ironically never ate it as a child.

    My porridge is made from brown rice, quinoa and steel cut oatmeal.

    The first version is the sweet version with honey or sugar and milk which I think is the common version today.

    My second version is an Asian version with ground pork, chopped kimchi chives which gives it a garlicky fermented flavor and an infused ginger oil that I make.

    The Asian version is outstanding! I was shocked at how complex it tastes. It tastes like something from an expensive trendy restaurant in a big city. It’s amazing how an old style poor people’s food can be elevated into something gourmet tasting.
     
  2. Chunkocaster

    Chunkocaster Poster Extraordinaire

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    I've only had Quakers Oats porridge, my grandparents would make it for me for breakfast every day through winter when I stayed with them. One would put salt on it, the other sugar.
    I settled on sugar when I started making it for myself but still with a pinch of salt when cooking it. Served swimming in whole milk. Sticks to your ribs and is a good start to the day along with a strong coffee.
     
  3. dan1952

    dan1952 Friend of Leo's

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    Both sound great to me.
     
  4. charlie chitlin

    charlie chitlin Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

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    I live in sort of a commune.
    There are about 120 of us here...12 in my house.
    Not easy to cook 3 meals a day for 12 people.
    We streamline things by having oatmeal (steel cut) 5 mornings a week.
    Raising, walnuts, sunflower seeds, milk, yogurt, sugar or maple syrup, butter....
    I love yellow grits (polenta) with salt, pepper, cheese and hot sauce, but few share my enthusiasm.
    Oddly, I've never had oatmeal done savory like that.
    It just seems like a sweet thing to me...oatmeal raisin cookies, right?
    Anybody do their oatmeal savory?
     
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  5. Ribsspare

    Ribsspare Tele-Meister

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    If I read correctly, people ate savory porridge in the Middle Ages made with vegetables and sometimes meat was added if they had extra money to afford it since meat was expensive back then.

    Here is a painting from the 1600s of an old woman eating porridge. Personally I prefer savory porridge.


    C2C48D3D-CA44-41B9-A793-89E05FC48AC7.jpeg
     
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  6. David Barnett

    David Barnett Doctor of Teleocity

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    Whenever I see workers on lunch break at a Chinese restaurant, they're always eating a bowl of some kind of rice porridge. I've never seen it on the menu. I've always wondered if it's sweet, savory, or bland/unseasoned? I fear the latter.
     
  7. Ribsspare

    Ribsspare Tele-Meister

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    I love it. It’s savory. That’s how I made up my Asian version of it. I also had a Vietnamese version of it too at a Vietnamese restaurant where they added ground pork. So basically I copied the Asian idea and made my version of it. You can be creative and add Vietnamese fish sauce if you want and experiment. I tried it with organ meats too to make it old world style and that worked too. You can be creative and add whatever. There’s no rules because it’s an old style peasant dish.
     
  8. Deeve

    Deeve Friend of Leo's

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    Might you be thinking of Congee rice?
    Yes, it's a staple and super flexible - flavored w/ anything you've got on hand, and only bland/plain if that's how you roll.
    Congee was available every morning when we were in Shanghai to meet our daughter.
    Most often served to us w/ soy sauce and some scrambled eggs and a little shrimp.
    Though she was only about 9mo old when we met her, our daughter knew Exactly What To Do when presented w/ a spoonful of shrimp/rice congee.

    Never thought about having my oats in savory format.
    Cool idea.

    Peace - Deeve



    https://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2014/09/grond-pork-corn-congee-recipe-dim-sum-chinese.html
     
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  9. Obsessed

    Obsessed Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I eat steel cut organic oatmeal pretty much 6 months a year (winter;)). I'll put raisins or frozen blueberries on top. My dad taught me how to cook them without getting mushy. It was the first bonding moment with my very young step-daughters when I made it for them the first time. They are both in their mid thirties now and still make it like my dad. Cheerios with unsweetened soymilk the other half of the year, unless we have guests.

    I love rice with milk and sugar, but never considered it a staple, but more of a treat.

    I love savory foods, so I might try some of these concoctions listed in this thread.
     
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  10. dogmeat

    dogmeat Tele-Afflicted

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    ok.... ya made me hungry, but I got chocolate cake on the counter top.... right over there.......... see ya
     
  11. perttime

    perttime Tele-Afflicted

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    There's so many kinds of porridge.
    My childhood breakfasts were often oatmeal or ryemeal porridge. I got it on a deep plate, with milk. A little sugar spread on it, or an "eye" of butter that you let melt in the hot porridge.

    With oatmeal porridge, you need to be careful not to turn it into glue by overcooking it.

    Slowly and thoroughly cooked rice porridge can be great. I like it a few different ways: with fruit in it, with sugar and cinnamon spread on it, or with some kisel.

    Another regional favorite is "vispipuuro" (Finnish) or "klappgröt" (Swedish). You make a porridge with wheat semolina and berries and, when it starts to cool down, whip it into a foam-like consistency. Add sugar to taste. Many like to use rye flour instead of wheat. Berries with a bit of an edge are usually preferred: lingonberries or redcurrants, but even apricots or strawberries will work.
     
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  12. Ribsspare

    Ribsspare Tele-Meister

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    Yes. Congee is what I was talking about. I’ve tried the congee idea with oatmeal and my opinion it worked well. I now use a version with brown rice, oatmeal and quinoa.

    I also like the American grits which kind of reminds me of congee even though the flavor is completely different.
     
  13. Gibson

    Gibson Friend of Leo's

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    Porridge (oatmeal) should be made with water and salt, ye heaving roaster.
     
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  14. 6stringcowboy

    6stringcowboy Tele-Afflicted

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    Rolled whole oats for me with honey, cinnamon, and raisins.
     
  15. GreatDaneRock

    GreatDaneRock Tele-Meister

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    Same here! My grandmother from my Father's side was English and when we visited and stayed the night over she would make porridge, and she would serve it really early (6am) and you had no choice but to wake up and eat it.

    Good memories...
     
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  16. Boubou

    Boubou Doctor of Teleocity Gold Supporter

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    Why, oh why would anyone eat porridge when real food is available?
     
  17. perttime

    perttime Tele-Afflicted

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    You've never eaten porridge that is made properly?
     
  18. EsquireOK

    EsquireOK Friend of Leo's

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    Asian porridge is the real deal. I love that stuff!
     
  19. esseff

    esseff Tele-Holic

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    Porridge - truly a king amongst breakfast cereals! A slow-burning energy supply, full of fibre, vitamins and minerals, helps reduce cholesterol and high blood pressure. Tastes great too. What are you waiting for - eat some now!
     
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  20. drf64

    drf64 Poster Extraordinaire

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