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Easy on follow country

Discussion in 'Tab, Tips, Theory and Technique' started by Rayner, Aug 30, 2015.

  1. Rayner

    Rayner Tele-Meister

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    Easy TO follow.... whoops


    Hi all,

    I signed up here a while ago but this is my first post.
    I've only been playing for a couple of months (I've played in the past but not much).

    I'm currently having one to one lessons with the tutor my dad used to see 10+ years ago, he's a good tutor but I went to him to learn country sort of stuff mainly but the lessons keep coming back to blues which, although I do enjoy playing, it's not quite what I want. Trying to find a tutor locally for country doesn't seem to be easy, I've emailed a few and rang a couple but none of them instil me with confidence in teaching country lead.

    Anyway, so what I'm asking is are there any easy to follow, good country lessons online any of you can recommend? I've searched YouTube of course and learned a few decent licks etc and I've also tried Jamplay for the free week they do. The problem I found with Jamplay was (probably my fault) I went straight to the Brent Mason lessons and well. .. I had no idea what he was on about, I'm used to being taught note by note or x string at x fret etc. This is really the style I'd like to be taught in, at least to start with so does anyone know of a good series in this teaching style? Obviously I don't mind paying.

    Cheers
     
  2. hymiepab

    hymiepab Tele-Meister

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    Jason Loughlin has some excellent lessons on Truefire (you can try them for free, I believe).
    One class is pretty advanced, but I believe he has one called Country 123 that is more basic to get you started.
    He's a well organized and challenging teacher, in my opinion.
     
  3. Rayner

    Rayner Tele-Meister

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    Thanks, I've just had a look at that, might pull the trigger on that one. Seems very good value and not a single bad review. Thanks for the suggestion.
     
  4. Kingpin

    Kingpin Friend of Leo's

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    My suggestion is to abandon the "being taught note by note or x string at x fret" approach, it won't lead you to any significant progress.

    Learning to play licks, while of some benefit, does nothing to teach you practical application of those licks for use in other songs.

    What you need to learn to play country lead guitar is a solid understanding of chord construction, and how various scales relate to the underlying chords of a song. Country guitar is a mish-mash of multiple approaches... major, minor, blues, diminished, altered, chromactic scales, double stops, bends... all drawn upon on the fly to create the end result. Find a teacher that can give you a solid background in basic music theory, and its application, and you will make lasting progress. It provides a framework for understanding the licks you hear (and want to play). You'll begin to understand why a lick works, and how you can apply it to other situations.

    A tutor with a jazz background would be able to help if you can't find someone in the country genre.
     
  5. PapaH

    PapaH Tele-Meister

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    If you are into a lot of new stuff (with a touch of traditional stuff), you may want to check out www.sixstringcountry.com. Tons of songs, everything it taught note-for-note, and most songs have a seperate rhythm part and lead part to learn.
     
  6. Rayner

    Rayner Tele-Meister

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    Thanks for the suggestions, I see what you mean Kingpin and unfortunately when I started learning the first time I skipped the theory part and also a lot of The basic chords etc. I'll have a look at Jazz guys, I'm sure there were a few, thanks.

    Thanks PapaH, that's more or less what I'm into, I'll check that site out as well.
    Thanks
     
  7. Rayner

    Rayner Tele-Meister

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    Little update for those that gave me advice here, thank you again.

    I found a teacher reasonably local with a Jazz background who has also played with 'quite country bands' (his words, not 100% sure what he meant by that but I guess southern rock, modern country type stuff or rock bands with a few country songs). I had my first lesson with him on Saturday, we got on really well and I like his style of teaching and he went straight to starting with a Brad Paisley song so he obviously listened. Early days yet but he said he likes to explain things more in depth than what I've been used to which is good, I've phoned a few so when I get chance I may go to see all of them and make a proper decision from there.

    I've also found a theory book which I actually understand! Really starting to get into it and enjoying it now. Its also allowed me to start to understand what everyone's talking about on this site.
     
  8. ddewerd

    ddewerd Friend of Leo's Ad Free Member

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    Well good on you!

    But it only gets scarier as you learn more and more :lol:

    I've been studying for years now and all I really know is how little I really know :eek:

    But seriously, when I started learning the theory and being able to apply it (even in a limited way) it really opened up my playing. Just knowing that behind the scenes there is actually a method to the madness (even if I may or may not actually fully understand that method) is a huge step in the right direction.

    Good luck!

    Cheers,
    Doug
     
  9. colchar

    colchar Friend of Leo's

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    Which book?
     
  10. Rayner

    Rayner Tele-Meister

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    Haha, thanks. Not a massive amount has really soaked in yet (I've only read through it once and not properly studied it yet) but the things that have are like light bulbs above my head! Just things like 'formulas' for chords and scales have been brilliant. Some things are so obvious after you read them aren't they! Things like how to turn A into Am, E into Em etc are chords I already knew but had no idea why dropping that finger down a fret made it into a minor! I know this is all extremely basic stuff and there are probably people thinking 'well, duh' but you don't know until you know do you :).
    I decided to go for one of the Mel Bay books and found one I thought sounded like a good place to start as it's called the Easiest Guitar Theory book! It's the only thing I've read on theory that puts it into layman's terms enough for me to fully understand. Once I've soaked it all up I shall be buying another
     
  11. jaytee32

    jaytee32 Tele-Meister

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    Nice thread. About the theory stuff, I find leapfrogging around helps a whole lot. I started out in theory with Edly's Music Theory for Practical People. After a few chapters I got bogged down a bit, and picked up Fred Sokolow's Fretboard Roadmaps for Country guitar that I had laying around. Suddenly the theory stuff in there was dead easy. After messing around in that book, I realized his roadmaps were a subset of the CAGED so I went off and got me a TrueFire course on that. After messing with that for a while, I ran back over to Edlys for clarification on a concept and now that book was a lot more understandable.

    And get out and play. Jam sessions are great. You'll play stuff you don't know and have to hear it. And I tell you, it is such a giant thrill to be playing something that is in F#m and hear the leader yell out "five" and you know which chord that is.

    And finally: listen to some record you really like, and figure out the guitar part. I mean the real guitar part, not just barre chords that have the correct tonality but no, the actual notes being played. Invest in something like "Transcribe" that will slow it down and even show you what the individual notes are if you get stuck.

    Seriously, every time you do one of the above, you make it just a little bit easier. Trick is to just get started, don't be intimidated, and don't get stuck!
     
  12. Rayner

    Rayner Tele-Meister

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    Thanks for that, I'll check out those books.

    As for jams, I do jam with my dad occasionally. I'm no where near ready to play with anyone else yet but it's certainly something I look forward to :)

    As it happens I asked my dad to record a short, fairly simple lick for me to work out (someone on here mentioned doing this) which I'm planning to try when I get time in the next few days. I actually did work out my first ever part of a song last week all on my own. It was a short and simple sounding Brent Mason Lick (still working on the chords to get it right although it's not my favourite song, just that particular lick interested me). It was such a great feeling working that out especially Brent Mason being one of my favourite players even though it was a simple and fairly slow lick

    I've just google'd Transcribe and quite a few come up, is it this one you're talking about? http://www.seventhstring.com/ I've got a decent app to slow down and loop songs & A-B looper but that sounds like a good tool.
     
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