Easy musical theory quizz

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by johnny k, Sep 19, 2019.

  1. backporchmusic

    backporchmusic Friend of Leo's

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    Theory? Or musical notation literacy?
     
  2. nojazzhere

    nojazzhere Poster Extraordinaire

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    I did get 8/8....but had to think a minute on the last one. While I did study piano, and thus had to read both bass and treble clefs, most of my experience reading music was violin (treble clef) and choral music as a tenor. (treble clef, sung an octave lower)
    And I, too, fell for Larry F's "trick" question, although it wasn't really a trick. I just ran with the initial reaction to two sharps, without considering the bass line. Dumb me! ;)
     
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  3. nojazzhere

    nojazzhere Poster Extraordinaire

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    My humble opinion, as a four year music major in Theory/Composition, is that music "theory" is a big umbrella term. It covers a LOT of ground in musical training. ;)
     
  4. Blue

    Blue Tele-Holic

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  5. Lawdawg

    Lawdawg Tele-Holic

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    7/8 that's the one that got me. Studied piano back in the day but never knew the official name of the lines outside the staff!

    Agreed that this is not exactly theory which I would have failed spectacularly!
     
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  6. telemnemonics

    telemnemonics Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    And "training" can mean more than one thing.
    Training large numbers of students using prepared curricula would be impossible without music notation.
    Or at least inefficient.

    Yet once again, the music and the theory came before there was notation.
    Study and learning music theory does not require notation, though working with other musicians in the collaborative art form is hampered by a lack of verbal music notation vocabulary.


    Interesting though if notation by itself is held up as theory.
    The theory of the notation would be in how one chooses to interpret a written piece, where it can be played differently.
    Hearing one culture and another culture play a familiar classical piece can show how their theory of the meaning nuance within the notated music differs.

    Any more words I'll just sound dumber and dumber.
     
  7. rcole_sooner

    rcole_sooner Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    I missed 2. I didn't know what ledger lines were or what the notes in the bass staff were.
     
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  8. johnny k

    johnny k Friend of Leo's

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    I m sorry for butchering english, but ' is a pain to me. I ve already enough é,à,ç and so on.
     
  9. johnny k

    johnny k Friend of Leo's

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  10. schmee

    schmee Poster Extraordinaire

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    Just another way to get you on their list. they're going to need a faster website to get me to do it.
     
  11. raito

    raito Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    8/8 And I agree that there was no theory there, just notation.
     
  12. Larry F

    Larry F Doctor of Teleocity Vendor Member

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    The A# in the B minor excerpt is the leading-tone. The leading-tone is what initiates the resolution to the tonic note. If you are looking for a tonic in a melodic line, watch for a possible preceding leading-tone.

    In B minor, you have the same notes as D major, with the super-important exception of the raised leading-tone, A#.

    In Bach's time, it was common to end a piece in a minor key on a major tonic. In this example, the minor tonic in B minor and a major tonic is B major. Checking the chord tones: B minor = B D F#, B major = B D# F#. Notice that the third is raised (sharped) in major.

    The numbers at the bottom are figured-bass labels. Without yet referring to the example, let me just give a taste of this subject in saying that a triad in root position can be expressed as a bass note with the figure 5/3 (means 5 over 3). If you count up 3 scale steps from B, you get D. If you count up 5 scale steps from B, you get F#. This is such a common voicing, that usually no figure is given. Now, with such a situation, if you see a # in the figured-bass part, you will raise a minor third to a major third. (The # in general means to raise a semitone).

    I must brag. For my PhD practicum exams, one was to realize a figured-bass from a bass line with figures. (This used to be known as the basso-continuo or just continuo part). I didn't think I would do well, but my years of jazz chords were a big help. Oh yeah, what made the exam extra hard was that I had to obey the conventions of voice-leading in that style. (No parallel 5ths, etc.) Anyway, it was all so hard, but I unexpectedly did great. I went into the jury room with three faculty, and played the example at sight. Afterwards, the esteemed and beloved late Howard Mayer Brown said "bravo," the last word he ever spoke to me before he died in Venice a few weeks later.

    Gonna ramble now, as I am getting a little misty. When my class of students entered the program, we were asked to sit at the piano and play through stuff, to give them a sense of where we were. In order to graduate, we had to pass 6 exams: sight-reading, sight-singing, dictation, figured-bass, score-reading, and old clefs in 4-parts. This was one of my trouble areas, as my training was not much in classical, but jazz. After stumbling through a few pages, Howard Brown (again on the committee) said to me, "Well, it's obvious you'll be able to pass these." That comment SAVED me. It has often been observed that graduate students tend to feel that they are imposters, and that a mistake had been made in admissions. Thankfully, Howard let me know right away that I belonged there. Now THAT'S a teacher.
     
  13. Blue

    Blue Tele-Holic

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    Your English is excellent, you just need to hit ' not the space bar.
     
  14. Musekatcher

    Musekatcher Tele-Afflicted

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    Aced it, but had to think. The last one, I had to really think, only knowing one of the four, and piecing together the correct four.

    D triads ascending first three notes, fourth note I'd go with an A triad, followed by G triads over notes 5 thru 8, and an A triad descending over notes 9 thru 11, ascending over 12 and 13, with a major chord on the last note. I'm going for the maj7 sound with the F# in the bass on the first change.
     
  15. LKB3rd

    LKB3rd Friend of Leo's

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    8/8. I eliminated one answer from question 8, since it didn't have the right spacing, then guessed :p
     
  16. Digital Larry

    Digital Larry Tele-Afflicted

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    I took one quarter of music theory in college. At one point we were doing this 4-part harmony stuff and I was sure I'd done OK and got my homework back with an F. Turns out nearly everyone else did too. Not sure if that was a teaching strategy or what.
     
  17. BigDaddyLH

    BigDaddyLH Telefied Ad Free Member

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    F? I bet it was actually D minor.
     
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  18. tubedood

    tubedood Tele-Meister

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    I played Trumpet most of my younger life before the switch to guitar, 4th grade thru college. Trumpet I was taught theory-wise... guitar I learned mostly on my own thru tablature.

    I missed the question about the lines above the staff (ledger or stave). Sighs.. It has been ages since I took a test on music but I didn't do too bad after all these years.
     
  19. Kingpin

    Kingpin Friend of Leo's

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    I scored 8/8, which is odd because I don't read music.
     
  20. johnny k

    johnny k Friend of Leo's

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    but the space bar is so big and the ' key is so tiny ! i'll try from now on.
     
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