Dust Extraction

Discussion in 'The DIY Tool Shed' started by frank1985, Jul 12, 2021.

  1. frank1985

    frank1985 Tele-Meister

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    Last edited: Jul 12, 2021
  2. E-miel

    E-miel Tele-Meister

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    I'm no dust expert. But the first option is a dust collector. It has a high vacuum pressure but a low flowrate. The second option is a chip collector with low vacuum pressure but a high flow rate. My personal option is you need both, depending on the tool/situation.

    The first option is a good option for the router. For the bandsaw it depends on the size. Previously I used a dust collector on my 14 inch bandsaw. It worked well for fine dust, but for the bigger wood particals I had to open the door of the bandsaw to clean up. Now I switched to a chip collector and it catches al the particles, although I suspect it catches fewer fine particles than the dust collector did. I also use an air cleaner unit. I don't own professional dust/chip collectors, so for me these are more about keeping the shop clean than saving my lungs. For my lungs I always use a good quality dust mask with dust generating operations.

    I have a similar unit as the Bosch from Makita which I mainly use for the router and sanders. It works well for me, but I still use a dust mask.

    So no real answer to your question, but I hope it helps.
     
  3. frank1985

    frank1985 Tele-Meister

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    Thank you Emiel. Tbh at this stage I’m more concerned with dust extraction rather than chips...I’m a first time guitar builder, and when routing my neck I was surprised at the amount of dust produced. I am of course already using a dust mask but this will at least help me spend more time working and less time sweeping up.

    So I’ll probably end up going for the Bosch as it seems like it’ll do the job at a decent price. That is unless anyone wants to chip in with a better option at a similar price range.
     
  4. backwater

    backwater TDPRI Member

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    I have one of the lumberjack extractors(the BD1200 - basically the same unit) connected to my tools via a cheap cyclone extractor and find it works well. My system runs 63mm pipes from the tools > 63-50mm adaptor into the cyclone and 50-100mm adaptor from the cyclone to the extractor.

    Cyclone is one of these : https://www.amazon.co.uk/Hamimelon-Plastic-Separation-Cleaners-Collector/dp/B07258R4BH with a plastic drum on the bottom.

    Very little saw dust makes it to the extractor with probably 99 % being removed by the cyclone. I've not tried the extractor on it's own.

    I've not tried it with the router but it works well with the table saw, band saw and disk sander.

    Andy

    Edit - found a photo

    IMG_0766.JPG
     
    Last edited: Jul 13, 2021
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  5. Peegoo

    Peegoo Poster Extraordinaire

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    For a small shop, a good affordable system is a large Shop Vac and a small portable cyclone. You connect the Shop Vac's hose to the cyclone, and connect the cyclone to your power tool. The cyclone captures the big stuff and the Shop Vac gets the dust. Use a bag in your Shop Vac for best performance and ease of cleanup.

    You can get a cyclone lid that fits a standard 5-gallon plastic bucket.

    Make (or get) a small cart or dolly board (casters) and mount your Shop Vac and cyclone to it. Makes it a cinch to bring the dust extraction to the power tool.

    It's how I do it.
     
  6. frank1985

    frank1985 Tele-Meister

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    Very helpful, thanks guys.

    Btw @E-miel, what are you using for the air cleaner?
     
    Last edited: Jul 13, 2021
  7. E-miel

    E-miel Tele-Meister

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    Hi Frank,

    My air cleaner is a home built unit. I bought the filters via a local hobby woodworker that works for a filter company. It's a G4 filter followed by a F9 filter. The fan moves about 1200m³ per hour without the filters. I learned from the filter guy that you need to refresh all the air in your shop 8 to 10 times per hour. My shop is about 100m², so after filtering my fan is plenty enough.
    [​IMG]
    IMG_20210404_160143.jpg IMG_20210404_160154.jpg

    Hope this helps!
     
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  8. Telekarster

    Telekarster Friend of Leo's Gold Supporter

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    I use a 30 buck "Lasko 20" Air Circulator Wind Machine, 3-Speed Floor Fan" turned on high, and open my shop doors to suck/blow dust out.... works pretty well for me ;)
     
  9. Davecam48

    Davecam48 Poster Extraordinaire Ad Free Member

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  10. Axis29

    Axis29 Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    Here in the States, we have Harbor Freight. It's a chain of stores that sells crappy, cheap Chinese manufactured tools. There are some decent tools, some okay tools and a lotta crap. LOL

    But, one staple of a lot of hobby wood shops (and actually, a lot of small pro shops) is the 2 HPO dust collector system they sell - https://www.harborfreight.com/2-hp-industrial-5-micron-dust-collector-97869.html

    There are a ton of companies selling either this unit in a different color, or systems very similar. But, that 2 HP works great at sucking up dust and chips from my router table, my table saw, my bandsaw. my hand sanders, etc. Although, to make it really work well, and slow the clogging of the filter, I built a pre-separator out of an old plastic barrel and some scrap wood.... This set up takes up a bit of room, a 50 gallon drum that sits next to the motor/bag/filter (Which I have mounted to the wall). I have just finished and delivered a project, and my shop is a mess. But, after I clean up some of the scrap piled in front of it, I will try to remember to take some pictures later... I don't have a lot of money in the system, but it has made a world of difference in the amount of stray dust around the shop and my general breathing ability!

    I have also built an air cleaner as well. I built it into the rolling cart that holds my thickness planer and my wood lathe. I bought one fo those inexpensive box fans and popped a pile of filters in front of it (I went from Merv 4 to Merv 14 or so). I like the fancy design @E-miel built. That's nice and I like the spread out surfaces! Very nice!
     
  11. eallen

    eallen Friend of Leo's

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    A good shop vac with a cyclone works decently for a hobby even more for a short time. I used one for few years as my primary. Even after moving to a hard piped dust collector I still use my shopvac/cyclone for clean up. sweeping, and onnected to portable sanders in addition to dust collection.


    I find I switch tools too often for the auto switch functions to be of much value on a shop vac. I keep a remote on/off attached to the hose end.
     
  12. Frodebro

    Frodebro Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    The router is probably the messiest power tool out there, they throw debris in every direction at very high speeds. A shop vac has more than enough suction to deal with it, but the trick is getting the mess under control right at the tool itself so that the vacuum can do its job. I tried all kinds of aftermarket attachments for my DeWalt through the years, but nothing worked well enough to catch everything. I would guess that the best I could achieve was still maybe 50% or so.
     
  13. montyveda

    montyveda TDPRI Member

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    After splashing out on a spindle sander, I soon realised that i'd need some serious dust extraction, but rather than buying one, i decided to make one instead. So i gathered some bits and bobs...

    bits & bobs.jpg

    I knew I'd have some bits left over... but this is what i ended up using:

    • one large brewers bucket
    • a regular builders bucket
    • a short length of waste pipe
    • various waste pipe fittings
    • various old vacuum cleaner hoses
    • some wood
    • some nuts and bolts
    • a small broken cafetiere
    • a broken pizza cutter
    • a screw and grommet off a bike light mount
    • a spring from the old washing machine
    The regular bucket with two holes in the top and one in the side, plus the waste pipe...
    5 - the inlet pipe.jpg

    the pizza wheel, cafetiere part, spring, bike light screw, etc. to make a valve... 3 - the valve.jpg

    the valve assembled... 4 - the valve.jpg

    and in place... 4b - valve in situ.jpg

    inside view... (I ended up removing the home bodged hepa filter as it just clogged up)
    9a - filter and valve.jpg

    A piece of wood, cut and routed and bodged to connect the little bucket to the big bucket...
    11 - top with clamps.jpg
    ...and a lick of paint and lots of filler to make it look nice.

    The final thing linked up between the tool and a regular vacuum cleaner.
    13 - connected to the sander.jpg

    Total cost, less than £30 plus a good few hours of my time. Works a treat :cool:


    edit... this guy inspired me.
     
    Last edited: Jul 25, 2021
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