Duplicolor blushing problem

Discussion in 'Finely Finished' started by 1954 Esquire, Jul 20, 2019.

  1. 1954 Esquire

    1954 Esquire TDPRI Member

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    Started spraying a new Telecaster build with Duplicolor. It has blushed on the last color coat, living in north Florida I had expected this to happen. Has anyone tried the Mohawk No Blush spray can? Or any other brand suggestions.
     
  2. dan40

    dan40 Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    The Mohawk blush eraser is made for use on nitrocellulose lacquer so I'm not sure that it would work with the Duplicolor.
     
  3. RottenTheCat

    RottenTheCat Tele-Meister

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    Heat the finish gently with a hair dryer
     
  4. Silverface

    Silverface Poster Extraordinaire Ad Free Member

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    Yes.

    DO NOT spray directly on the surface!! Start out about 18" above the surface and LIGHTLY fog a SMALL amount over - parallel to - the surface, letting it float down. Wait a few seconds. If it doesn't disappear try a bit more - but go slowly and gently and NEVER spray directly at the surface - you'll melt the lacquer and cause immediate runs!

    Runs MAY happen anyway - but it's better to sneak up to them than have them happen right away. If it works, great - if it doesn't wait a few days for it to dry (the solvents are a blend of very fast acting and very slow drying types and will slow the overall drying time from 30 minutes to several days in most cases) - it STILL may go away, but if not you'll have to sand.

    It makes absolutely no difference. The solvents used in nitro and acrylic lacquers are virtually identical, which is why thy are fully compatible with and can be applied over each other. Many products are actually a blend of the two.

    I don't recommend this until at least a couple of types of blush eraser/reducer have been tried. Blush is trapped moisture, and a hair dryer causes the moisture to expand as it further hardens the top of the coating by evaporation of the hotter, faster drying solvents. This causes blisters. If done at all go it on low heat from far off the surface and keep the thing moving constantly. It's unusual that it works, and if you don't see the blush disappear inside of 20 seconds or so - STOP!

    When you continue normal spraying be sure to apply VERY light coats using 3 EXTREMELY light passes per coat! A "coat" should not flow smoothly or cover until you get to the last one or two clear coats. That's when it starts to fully melt together, flow, and create a single coat of lacquer.

    Ideally it should end up smooth enough to go straight to buffing. Surface sanding is a repair operation, and shouldn't be necessary. If it is, 1500 should be the roughest paper used - if it's worse than that it's due to an application problem. In that case I'd do more practice spraying, get your technique dialed-in, then slowly spray more clear to build it up to a smooth surface.
     
    Last edited: Jul 22, 2019
    dan40 likes this.
  5. RottenTheCat

    RottenTheCat Tele-Meister

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    Regarding hair dryer...

    In my own experience, which you have no knowledge of, but is not inconsiderable, I've found it generally works well - in humid environs, such as I encounter here in Florida. Never had a blister, or other bad occurrence. I will say though, that the hot air approach must be done quickly after blush appears, before you have a decent cure going on with the lacquer.

    I don't like blush remover. Tends to permanently soften the lacquer in my experience, but... each person, their environs, and materials do vary, so I accept that may work well for others. What I've done is to use acetone in a very fine mist, just enough to slightly soften the lacquer, then apply dry heat. And that has worked for me without exception when the blush is not noticed until later on.

    YMMV, yada yada, always test first.
     
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