dupli color problems...

stratisfied

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Ok, again, it's blush.

No it's not. If you look at the pics, you can see a regular pattern to the "stripes". They are called "wipe-down" tracks from using too hot a solvent or using too much solvent which pooled and softened the paint before it evaporated.

It's as obvious as the nose on my face. You can see every stroke that the OP wiped down the body including where he tailed off as he got to the edge of the body.

Blushing occurs where the paint pools and is thickest. It typically follows the outside contours or "rim" of the body where the paint builds up before spilling over the edge. There is no way the OP sanded such regular ridges in the body to have low spots for the paint to accumulate in. It would have looked like a washboard.

While the instructions may have said "use wax and grease remover or rubbing alcohol" for paint prep, they don't tell you how to use it and too much allows the solvent to soften the paint before it evaporates. This is why I use mineral spirits. It degreases, leaves no haze and doesn't affect lacquers regardless of how you apply it. The only thing you have to watch is that it is fully dried before painting as it evaporates slowly.
 

mkdaws32

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I'm not an expert, by any means. I started with a couple of "refins" and they went really well - probably because the wood was well sealed to begin with. But on open pore wood (palownia in my case), I had to do a lot of prep to avoid the same thing you have there. In my case, I sanded the wood smooth to 320 and then did a wash in wipe on poly with a sponge sanding block (220 maybe?). The sawdust mixes in with the poly and fills the pores nicely. I let it dry a day or so (not completely cure, mind you), leveled, and did it a second time and let it completely cure and leveled. Then multiple coats of auto primer and the duplicolor. This is what was successful. The Zinsser shellac based primer mentioned above by @Sax-son sounds like it might be less messy and quicker that what I did with the wipe on poly. I might try that next time.

I tried exactly what you did the first time - no pore filling and just a lot of coats of primer, and my results were the same as yours - maybe not as dramatic, but similar.

Again, I am still learning. I've only done a handful of finishes to date and they all took longer than anticipated, due to newbie mistakes. My spray gun is pretty cheap and I still have to refine my spraying technique, but the latest is not too bad ;)

image-jpg.898157



(no clear coat yet and it needs one last color coat to cover some thin spots due to my poor technique ;) But I'm pretty happy with the way the color went on and the success of the bare wood prep).
 

Sax-son

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I'm not an expert, by any means. I started with a couple of "refins" and they went really well - probably because the wood was well sealed to begin with. But on open pore wood (palownia in my case), I had to do a lot of prep to avoid the same thing you have there. In my case, I sanded the wood smooth to 320 and then did a wash in wipe on poly with a sponge sanding block (220 maybe?). The sawdust mixes in with the poly and fills the pores nicely. I let it dry a day or so (not completely cure, mind you), leveled, and did it a second time and let it completely cure and leveled. Then multiple coats of auto primer and the duplicolor. This is what was successful. The Zinsser shellac based primer mentioned above by @Sax-son sounds like it might be less messy and quicker that what I did with the wipe on poly. I might try that next time.

I tried exactly what you did the first time - no pore filling and just a lot of coats of primer, and my results were the same as yours - maybe not as dramatic, but similar.

Again, I am still learning. I've only done a handful of finishes to date and they all took longer than anticipated, due to newbie mistakes. My spray gun is pretty cheap and I still have to refine my spraying technique, but the latest is not too bad ;)

image-jpg.898157



(no clear coat yet and it needs one last color coat to cover some thin spots due to my poor technique ;) But I'm pretty happy with the way the color went on and the success of the bare wood prep).
Not bad from what I am looking at. Everything looks pretty smooth from this angle. One it gets it's clear coat and a few minutes on a buffing wheel, it should look sweet.
 

DrASATele

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Duplicolor - the tips clog easily on the metallic, and I found that I need to spray a bit longer (to get that metallic color to look even and not full of primer) than say Color tone or Behlen's spray cans.
 

thaynes

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Update on my duplicoler issues.

I think that I can safely say that my problem was due to the use of rubbing alcohol. After my last post, I had an idea that this may have just been due to scuffing the surface with an 800 grit scuff pad. So, I first tried to use a 600 grit wet/dry sandpaper to sciff the surface, cleaned it with rubbing alcohol and repainted it. As some of you may already know, that did not work at all.

Next iteration, a few days later...I scuffed with 600 grit and used duplicolor scratch fill primer to cover everything up. No Alcohol. I went this direction as I thought I was going to have to change colors as someone had cleaned out the DCM from all the local autoparts stores. The rumor is that some guy was painting guitar...Anyway I was able to find a fresh can of DCM and painted the guitar. The picture speaks for itself.

I still need to spray clear coat, but that will be in another week or so.

Thanks for all of your help!


Tom.
 

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stratisfied

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I rest my case.

That's looking good! You should be able to go straight to the clear coats. Do not sand the metallic base coat. Use a packaged tack cloth between coats.

If for any reason you feel compelled to clean the surface, just wipe down with Mineral Spirits and give it time to evaporate before you tack and paint. The thing about mineral spirits is even if you flood the surface, it won't harm anything as long as you allow enough time for it to evaporate. Because it is pure distilled spirits, it leaves no film when it evaporates like Paint Thinner does. Duplicolor Prep Wipes or Paint Prep are fine too if used sparingly.
 

Burn Yesterday

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Update on my duplicoler issues.

I think that I can safely say that my problem was due to the use of rubbing alcohol.


Oh, gosh, don't use rubbing alcohol. It has oil or lanolin or both in it for people's skin. Oiling up a surface before painting it is not a good idea.

The store has pure alcohol in the paints department. And Naptha, which I've become fond of lately.
 

Burn Yesterday

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Duplicolor - the tips clog easily on the metallic, and I found that I need to spray a bit longer (to get that metallic color to look even and not full of primer) than say Color tone or Behlen's spray cans.

Dial up ArtPrimo and ask them whether they have a nozzle (they call them caps) that's like Duplicolor but with a heavier (and hence less clog-prone) delivery. I'll bet they do, and they'll know what you're talking about.

I've drilled out nozzles too but this is not something that I would recommend people to do.
 

Sea Devil

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Burn Yesterday, rubbing alcohol does not have oil or lanolin in it. And I'm pretty sure you mean naphtha, not naptha.

The "pure alcohol" you refer to is probably denatured alcohol.
 




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