Duncan vintage noiseless stacks still noiseless when split?

Discussion in 'Just Pickups' started by klasher, May 15, 2021.

  1. klasher

    klasher Tele-Holic

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    I'm not positive but I think the duncan vintage noiseless stacks for tele offer a split coil mode. Are they still noiseless when split?
     
  2. PingGuo

    PingGuo Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    Not from what I saw on the product page.

    but it does look like the hot strat and classic strat stacks are rprw in the middle so you can split them and still have silent 2&4 position tones
     
  3. rigatele

    rigatele Tele-Afflicted

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    I can't imagine how a noiseless stack could sound very good split. Each coil individually is very lean, it's a design requirement in order for it to sound halfway like a single coil when not split. If you do it, make sure you short the bottom coil not the top one.
     
    Last edited: May 17, 2021
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  4. YoGeorge

    YoGeorge Tele-Afflicted

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    Split buckers of any type cease being humbucking because that is what the 2nd coil is for. I have always disliked split buckers of any kind because they sound weak and wimpy. If you wire a bucker or stack in parallel, they will be humbucking (like the combo of a pair of rw/rp pickups). I've got a pair of vintage stacks in a tele with a regular 3-way switch and they are a very decent sounding pickup pair without any "clever" wiring schemes.
     
  5. rigatele

    rigatele Tele-Afflicted

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    Yes, I kind of like the parallel sound in a standard humbucker, but it's not for everyone because the HB has a wider sensing window than a single coil. That reduces the treble slightly.

    Stacked single coil profile pickups usually don't have enough bobbin space for large turn counts, which leads to a series connection being standard. Those are struggling to achieve a low enough resonant frequency already, without having to deal with the completely opposite effects generated by a parallel connection. Most players would find it way too trebly.
     
  6. YoGeorge

    YoGeorge Tele-Afflicted

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    I haven't run a stack in parallel, come to think of it. What I have done is wire a Duncan lil '59 in parallel and it actually became useful (with an old Gibson minibucker in the neck). The small coils of the '59 solve the wide string read area, and Duncan sure uses a lot of wire. Duncan's strat Duckbuckers are twin coils that come wired in parallel, where the strat lil '59's are natively in series.

    My first coil-split switch was in a 1977 Gibson 335 that I bought in 1978 when Gibson used "dirty fingers" pickups and put the factory coil split switch on it. I played that guitar until 1993 (when I got into teles) and never once played anything with the coils split on that guitar.
     
  7. rigatele

    rigatele Tele-Afflicted

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    As you say, the little 59 has a fairly beefy wind, so it's not so much surprise that it sounds okay in parallel. I usually play with both pickups selected, so I had some luck with an arrangement of parallel wired HB's selected in series (the normal configuration is series wired HB's selected in parallel). That also allowed me to make the volume for each pickup in the mix completely independent. So, with both pickups selected, I could dial in exactly the amount of bridge/neck that I want.
     
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