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Drums..Electronic or Acoustic

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by Stickyfingers, Sep 10, 2013.

  1. dman

    dman Tele-Afflicted

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    The drummer in our old band had both. He first started playing the V-drums in practice, so that we could keep the sound low ( a condition of using his house per his wife...totally understandable). They sounded...ok. At best.

    Then he started playing out with them, because of the compact size and ease of set up. He liked 'em; everyone else in the band loathed them. The snare and the kick didn't sound too bad, but the toms, cymbals and high hat....crimony!

    This may have played a factor in the band's dissolution!
     
  2. Skully

    Skully Doctor of Teleocity

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    When I have jams in my garage studio, the drummer always plays the electronic drums. The acoustic drums are in an isolation booth set up for recording and not available for the "jams," but the drummer actually likes them. (He's the other non-pro in our dad band, but he's not a bad drummer. In fact, when when had this guest bassist who gigs with a klezmer band, he said it was great to play with a "real" drummer.)

    The electronic drums will give you a decent sound regardless of how you strike the pads, whereas the quality of the tones you get from an acoustic set has a lot to do with how you strike the heads. I play my acoustic drums in binges when recording, and I think the tuning issues I worry over in the initial stages of a binge are generally just a product of rusty technique not being up to snuff yet.
     
  3. jbdrumbo

    jbdrumbo Tele-Holic

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    Electronic drums are great for what they do - they have volume control, which makes them a great practice kit, and they can create interesting and varied percussive sounds.

    But even the top of the range V-kits don't sound like acoustic drums, and even less like cymbals.
    And aesthetically? I, and most drummers I know prefer a low dork factor when we play live, if given a choice. ; )
     
  4. Stickyfingers

    Stickyfingers Tele-Meister

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    Thanks for the info and comments......pretty much sums up what most of the guys I have talked to think also.....
     
  5. Mad Kiwi

    Mad Kiwi Friend of Leo's

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    Hopefully this is a different perspective for you...

    I am NOT a drummer but I have been dablling for years, mostly as a way of improving my timing in guitar and bass. I started with a Pearl Forum accoustic set but they were just plain too loud and took up WAY too much space.

    So we sold them, a few years later I decided an electronic kit would have a volume control and take up less space and that seeing as I am a beginner, regularity of practice was more a concern than outright tone was. I also decided that for home recording, playing a rythym was a lot easier than trying to program the drum machine and would probably sound better too...

    So I put on Hire Purchase a Yamaha DTX3 kit which I played a lot. I can now play basic Rhythms to many (uncomplicated) songs and love doing so.

    My drummer friends have played them and we have recorded a few things with them and to be honest they sound pretty good in the mix, I am sure the cymbals could be better but playing to the strengths of the kit sounds and minimising the weaknesses (cymbals) has provided some not bad tracks (better than I ever envisioned put it that way).

    Also to mention that proper drummers make them sound considerably better than me as a rank novice.

    I played these drums for a few years and decided to upgrade to a Roland TD30 kit, for a few reasons, they were interest free, they had volume sliders for each drum, the sounds were generally much improved (especially the snare)and as a novice I much prefer the Roland "bounce" than the Yamaha one (although the Yamaha bounce is more realistic to me and my friends).

    Overall I LOVE the new TD30 kit. The snare is spectacular, the cymbals vastly improved and very useable in recording (so long as you don't go crazy riding them) but the TOMS don't sound or feel quite right to me, not as good as the Yamaha ones to my ears anyway.

    So overall, I think the advantages outweigh the negatives for my situation.

    Oh, and I sold the Yamaha kit to my drummer friend who now actually practises due to having a headphone and/or volume control. He says he can play along to stuff better becasue he can now hear it over his playing..
     
  6. TeleTim911

    TeleTim911 Friend of Leo's

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    I was a drummer for many years, and have played both. I prefer acoustics. I just think nothing sounds as good as a real drum. As for controlling volume and mix, electronics work best....even the loudest drummer in the world is controlled with an electronic kit.

    For personal sound acoustic drums rule IMO.
     
  7. Gearhead88

    Gearhead88 Tele-Holic

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    Acoustic , they just sound right !

    [​IMG]
     
  8. Tdub

    Tdub Friend of Leo's

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    Acoustic drums. All day everyday. A properly tuned acoustic set, played by a skilled drummer...can't beat it.
     
  9. Skully

    Skully Doctor of Teleocity

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    I have a Ludwig white oyster pearl drum set that dates to 1963 or '64 that used to be my go-to kit. For years, I thought the color was supposed to be light green, because that's how the yellowing of the plastic made it look. If only vintage drums had value comparable to guitars of similar vintage. :cry:
     
  10. Drum Strummer

    Drum Strummer TDPRI Member

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    I play Ludwig, Slingerland and also a Yamaha electric. Acoustic wins hands down everytime as the best choice over all. No one has yet to perferct electric cymbals, rim shots or soft strikes.

    With that said, I use a Yamaha electric for quite practice and MIDI work. If your mixer/producer is skilled enough you can make electrics sound good. But if you play well, acoustics always sound better. IMO
     
  11. Teleagain

    Teleagain Tele-Meister

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    At the risk of reviving a dormant thread....

    Acoustic and electronic drums are very different beasts. I played some acoustic drums at the guitar player's house Friday night. It wasn't a high priced kit, lacked a crash cymbal. I started taking lessons and will get to learn on my teacher's kit, not sure of the brand, but it's a quality kit. So that will be abetter comarison.

    The acoustic drums are loud, sound is right in your face. It required the daintiest touch to play at the volume we wanted. They didn't have the best sound in my opinion. But again, not a quality kit.


    Both types have their pluses and minuses, differences. Just like acoustic electric guitars, not quite the same animals.
     
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