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Drum Sander Improvement

Discussion in 'The DIY Tool Shed' started by old wrench, Mar 5, 2021.

  1. old wrench

    old wrench Friend of Leo's

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    I picked one of the old Ryobi WDS 1600 drum sanders recently.

    Ryobi stopped making them quite awhile ago, but the design is very similar to the Performax or Jet.

    It was easy to see it hadn't had much use, and after talking to the previous owner I found out why.

    He said when he first bought it, he had someone come by and help him set it up and install the sandpaper on it.

    After the sandpaper wore out, he tried to replace the sandpaper, but he couldn't figure out how to do it. He ended up trying to glue sandpaper to the roller, but that didn't work either ;).

    So the drum sander just set where it was at in his basement. He was in the process of moving to another house, so he put the sander up for sale :).




    I got to looking at the sander and I could see why he had difficulty. There is a clip on the inboard side of the drum that is really hard to get to, especially if you are trying to retract the clip, hold the drum in place, and tuck the end of the sandpaper strip into the clip at the same time.

    You need at least three hands - bad design.



    I made up a third-hand gizmo that mounts using the existing hardware. It's nothing fancy, just a spring loaded bolt that extends out to catch the drum's sandpaper latching clip and holds it in place while I tuck the end of the sandpaper into the clip. Once the sandpaper is in place, a slight roll of the drum releases the bolt and it automatically retracts itself out of the way.

    Works good :).


    This is the sander as is, in it's poorly engineered glory -

    IMG_1173.JPG





    Here is a pic of the spring gizmo -

    IMG_1174.JPG





    Here is a pic of the gizmo installed on the sander -

    IMG_1176.JPG






    And here is a pic of the gizmo doing it's job, holding the clip in the retracted position -

    IMG_1177.JPG






    And released once again -

    IMG_1176.JPG





    I'm ready to install some sandpaper and put this drum sander to work now :).


    .
     
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  2. Davecam48

    Davecam48 Friend of Leo's Ad Free Member

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    Just like a bought one!!!!! Well Done!

    DC
     
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  3. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I had one of those. The rubber conveyor belt hardens due to UV. Then it won't hold the work and stops underneath, creating a dip. Not good on acoustic tops and backs or anything. I gave mine to my father in law who wasn't so picky. He used it until the conveyor gear motor died.

    I hope you can get some alternative belt, maybe abrasive ones would work if they can make the small radius rollers.


    Alternatives for clamping the spiral abrasive....fiberglass packing tape around the ends. My Delta which is now obsolete had spring loaded things and I see where some guys used bolts and washers in the indents to hold the abrasive to the drum.


    My Delta passed last week, so I guess I'll start looking at a Jet. I use the sander as much or more than a planer.
     
    Last edited: Mar 7, 2021
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  4. Colt W. Knight

    Colt W. Knight Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Im in the market for a drum sander. Considering both the Jet and Grizzly
     
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  5. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I guess from my perspective, the most important thing is the availability of parts down the road. I have had 3 drum sanders that now don't have parts available to them. Grizzly could be the best option, but Jet has been around for a long time too. I wouldn't rely on a place like Woodcraft to guarantee they carry the product a few years from now....

    Consider the drum sanders that no longer exist. Performax, Ross, Ryobi, and Delta to name a few. I wouldn't count on Shop Fox either.
     
  6. Davecam48

    Davecam48 Friend of Leo's Ad Free Member

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    https://www.tdpri.com/threads/diy-drum-sander.355171/

    Hey Colt!
    A man of your capabilities should be able to build one. Here's a link to the thread where I built mine long time ago. It was OK to start with but I did a major modification not long after I built it by changing the top surface from the original MDF to a sheet of Caesar Stone (counter top marble ) which allows me to get virtually perfect thickness on pieces wider than a guitar body (down to a fraction of a millimeter over a width of about 18 inches!

    But being a retired electronics tech (who calibrated medical equipment for many years ) I built -in the facilities to enable the calibration function. The most important component which enables this result was the counter top marble work surface which still gives almost perfect results!

    DC
     
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  7. old wrench

    old wrench Friend of Leo's

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    I've already got my eye on an alternative conveyor belt :).

    The one on there now (the original) is still in surprisingly good shape - nice and flexible, no tears.

    I think that I'll try to preserve the belt by using a carrier board to run my pieces through. That way I can have full bearing on the belt.; maybe less chance of smaller pieces getting hung up and digging in. I'll have to see how it goes.

    Parts availability is pretty sparse, but that doesn't concern me at all. If something breaks or dies, I can either fix it or fabricate a new part.

    The main thing for me was to get a machine that had all the parts to start out with ;).

    The Ryobi design is the same as all the others - no big differences.

    .



    I wanted to buy a new
     
  8. old wrench

    old wrench Friend of Leo's

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    I've been looking for one for several years, Colt :).

    It's the one specialized tool that can do a specific job (hopefully) that I really wanted.

    I'm usually pretty good at fabricating stuff, but I thought if I could just get the major components for a drum sander, I'd be a lot further ahead, rather than piecing one together.

    What I really wanted was to buy a new SuperMax 16-32, but that just seems like a lot of money to me for a tool that only has one basic purpose. But, it's just the way it is. It is what it is ;).

    For right now, I've latched on to this Ryobi for at least $1,000 bucks less than what I'd have to cough-up for a SuperMax, plus it came with a half-way decent rolling stand and 3 boxes (12 pieces) of SuperMax abrasive wraps.

    And, the guy delivered it to my house.

    Like a lot of my stuff, I found it on CraigsList.

    Brand-new stuff is really nice, but used and well-cared for is OK for me ;).

    .
     
  9. old wrench

    old wrench Friend of Leo's

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    Yeah! It's just like a store bought one; something unusual in my shop Dave :) !!!

    I'm planning on using a carrier board to transport my pieces through on.

    I'm hoping that will help to even out the load and give more consistent results.

    Either it'll go, or it'll blow :).


    edit: Us tool junkies have GAS problems too ;).

    .
     
  10. Davecam48

    Davecam48 Friend of Leo's Ad Free Member

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    What my plan of attack is I only try to sand down 1 to 2mm at a time. This gives good results and if your bandsaw is set to cut as it should the rough section does not take very long to get to the desired thickness.

    I also like the fact with my home-made unit I can work the full size sheets down to the desired thickness after joining so there's no further processing of the tops/backs etc.

    If you do build one, make the top out of the bench-top granite at least 1/2" thick.

    DC
     
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