DRRI or PRRI for Chicken Pickin/Country

Discussion in 'Glowing Bottle Tube Amp Forum' started by Brett Fuzz, Mar 11, 2014.

  1. Brett Fuzz

    Brett Fuzz Tele-Holic

    Posts:
    901
    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2012
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    Guys,

    Which of these two amps would best suit Chicken Pickin & Country ?

    I am almost ready to pull the trigger on a Mustang III but thinking I might hold off & save the extra for a nice tube amp.

    I'm not a rock player. Country & Blues is what I enjoy.

    Not gigging either. Just for home use & the occasional jam. (with a drummer).
     
  2. NiceTele

    NiceTele Tele-Afflicted

    Posts:
    1,152
    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2012
    Location:
    Australia
    Hi mate- chicken pickin' involves a lot of technique and the amp is the end of the chain. Of course you cant go wrong with a DRRI, and I would pick it over a PRRI being a gigging guitarist. I recently heard a guy with a Tele using a Chinese made Peavey Bandit getting some wonderful chicken picken' tones!
     
  3. Brett Fuzz

    Brett Fuzz Tele-Holic

    Posts:
    901
    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2012
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    Thanks NiceTele,

    You re-enforce my thoughts & decision.

    I'm learning the country style & realise it's 90% technique, 10% gear.

    Just want the best sound I can get for my $$$ and something that will outlast me.

    Be a while till I can save the $1500 bucks though !

    Cheers,

    BF :)
     
  4. codamedia

    codamedia Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    4,961
    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2009
    Location:
    Western Canada
    I agree the tone is in the technique, but I would go for the DRRI. The more clean headroom the better...
     
  5. Middleman

    Middleman Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    3,975
    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2007
    Location:
    MV, CA
    If I was recording or home, it would be the Princeton. But for playing out and about the DRRI. I have both and the Princeton has a sweeter clarity but much lower volume.
     
  6. Johnny Cache

    Johnny Cache Former Member

    Posts:
    1,809
    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2014
    Location:
    Oregon
    I'm not very good at chicken pickin' but if your just a home player the Princeton should be all you need. I know few guys who gig with them and play everything on them. And love them. I would have picked one too but already have a '83 Super Champ and it's okay for stuff like that. However I play finger style jazz (think: Joe Pass, Herb Ellis) I like a 12" speaker better so I picked a DRRI for my main amp it's also the replacement for my original '66 DR I sold years ago. I use the SC as a back up, just incase.
     
  7. Brett Fuzz

    Brett Fuzz Tele-Holic

    Posts:
    901
    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2012
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    Thanks guys,

    Both sound like nice amps. I might have to go try them both. Wish I could afford one of each!

    One thing I notice, The Princeton is about $300 more than the Deluxe yet only 15 Watts compared to the Deluxe's 22 Watts ?

    Also the Princeton has less knobs to twiddle. Why the price difference ?

    (Sorry, I'm pretty new to the world of guitar amps).
     
  8. telerocker1988

    telerocker1988 Tele-Afflicted

    Posts:
    1,602
    Joined:
    May 2, 2010
    Location:
    Illinois
    To me it's more about headroom and volume needs. Both have a similar tone.

    For me if you can't hybrid or finger pick (as is the case with me), that chicken picking cluck comes from the compressor. Obviously if you fingerpick, you'll need less squash from your comp. Mine saves me and allows a classic rocker to be able to do chicken picking licks with a flatpick.

    Any Blackface Reverb amp should be great for classic-to-90s country. Princeton, Deluxe, Super, Pro, Twin, even a Vibrolux! :D
     
  9. kubiakl

    kubiakl Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    368
    Joined:
    May 9, 2012
    Location:
    Austin, TX
    Maybe it's different in Australia, but over here the Princeton Reverb is $100 less than the Deluxe Reverb.

    The DRRI has more knobs because it has two channels, the PRRI only has one. Each channel has two inputs - one is high, two is low.

    I'm sure you'll hear a lot of votes for both amps but I'll tell you that I love my DRRI. I tried the PRRI and it just didn't tickle me the way the Deluxe Reverb did. Good luck on your search!
     
  10. BelairPlayer

    BelairPlayer Tele-Afflicted

    Posts:
    1,194
    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2010
    Location:
    Ca
    I don't know where you're looking, but the Princeton tends to be about $100 less than the Deluxe.

    Also, the Deluxe has two channels and about twice as many knobs (tone and volume for each channel) as a Princeton.

    Regarding the tones, I'm in the camp that says Princeton for home/recording and Deluxe for gigging. Also, the Vibrato on the Princeton is far sweeter because it is a bias based effect. The Vibrato on the Deluxe is tube driven opto-isolator. Too my ears (and many others, Google it) this type of vibrato has an audible "ticking" in the vibrato channel that I just can't ignore at typical home volumes.

    Both are great amps, but for home/recording, I think the Princeton is the more satisfying amp.
     
  11. 1955

    1955 Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    9,945
    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2010
    Location:
    .
    I think you ought to check out an Allen Amps style blackface. For me, the PR trem is a huge factor over the DR. But the DRRI on heavy-choppy helicopter style trem is fun, too. The PRRI is great for low volumes and portability, but the DRRI sounds good too.
     
  12. Vizcaster

    Vizcaster Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    5,130
    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2007
    Location:
    Glen Head, NY
    Only amp I regret selling is a '71 silver-faced Princeton Reverb. it really was not loud enough for sitting in with a friend's band at bar gigs (not the loudest drummer, either) and was completely inaudible outdoors (some sort of community festival if I recall). But boy did it have a great tone. Now I finally have a DRRI but I'm beginning to doubt that there's one perfect amp for good tones at home at lower volumes and at the same time hits the sweet spot for breakup when playing out. I hope the DR fits the bill.
     
  13. doc w

    doc w Tele-Afflicted

    Posts:
    1,212
    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2011
    Location:
    Canada
    Wrong question. You can chicken pick and play country on all kinds of amps.

    Right question! PR's are great for home use but have a little bit of trouble keeping up with an athletic drummer unless they are miked well and you have good monitors.

    I have both a bf DR and a early SF PR. The DR has more clean headroom, for sure. PR's really sparkle - at least mine does - but get a little flatulent rather quickly when you turn up.
     
  14. joeford

    joeford Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    3,968
    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2013
    Location:
    st. louis, illinois
    as noted above, the princeton would be the better choice of the two for home uses. it's definitely at the upper registers of volume though. i've got a silverface PR as a "bedroom amp" now... but its a hair too loud for my uses. thankfully, it does sound excellent at lower volumes too. it doesn't stand a fat chance in hell at a gig though

    if you're thinking about spending that much on an amp, try to get ahold of a vintage model instead of a reissue. if it turns out that you don't like it, you can always get your money back
     
  15. sbpark

    sbpark Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    4,021
    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2009
    Location:
    The West
    An old Silverface Champ will do the chicken picking thing really well, especially if you're at home and can't crank it up very loud. At low to moderate volumes my Champ gets played more than any other amp I own. Best home/practice amp there is in my opinion that still is affordable and have a great tube tone!
     
  16. Brett Fuzz

    Brett Fuzz Tele-Holic

    Posts:
    901
    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2012
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    Thanks to all for the info and advice. I'm all ears.

    Leaning towards the Deluxe Reverb at this point. I already have a Vox Pathfinder 15R that I find a little anaemic in a jam situation with a drummer.

    The extra oomph from the DRRI @ 22Watts would be nice to have.
     
  17. Commodore 64

    Commodore 64 Friend of Leo's

    Age:
    44
    Posts:
    3,969
    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2010
    Location:
    Kent, OH
    For chicken pickin' don't you want real crisp attack? And for that don't you want a SS rectifier?
     
  18. sbpark

    sbpark Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    4,021
    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2009
    Location:
    The West
    I don't think a SS vs. tube rectifier is an absolute deal breaker. For me I'd be more concerned about clean headroom. I have a '59 BMRI LTD that's a tube rectifier. and a '68 Bandmaster thats SS rectifier, and they both are well suited for chicken pickin'.
     
  19. DakotaRed

    DakotaRed Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    140
    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2009
    Location:
    DFW, Texas, USA
    OP: have you considered a Music Man amp? Loud, clean & relatively cheap. The are basically Fenders, post-Fender.

    For example, I have a 100w 6L6 combo with brand new 200w EV in it. I'd probably have trouble selling it for $500. Check GCs used website for realistic prices. I A/B'ed against a silverface Deluxe Reverb when I bought it and left with the MM if that tells you anything.

    You will find some negative comments online about these amps but I suspect the last time the critics played a MM was in the '80s....
     
  20. sbpark

    sbpark Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    4,021
    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2009
    Location:
    The West
    I actually just got rid of a MM amp. It was an 212 HD130. Amp was loud as all get out and stayed clean, but it was just missing something. sounded bland and blah to me compared to a Twin. Had no sparkle to it. Kind of anemic.
     
IMPORTANT: Treat everyone here with respect, no matter how difficult!
No sex, drug, political, religion or hate discussion permitted here.


  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.