Drill Presses

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by mudbean, Apr 3, 2009.

  1. mudbean

    mudbean Friend of Leo's

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    O.K., I wanna buy a drillpress ... we've established that I need at least a 12" press, but what about:

    Benchtop, or Floor standing?

    What do y'all prefer? Also, do you bolt your drillpress base to the bench or floor?

    They've got some nice looking Ryobi's for cheap at Home Despot right now.

    mud
     
  2. KevinB

    KevinB Doctor of Teleocity

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    I have an older version - without the laser - of the Craftsman 12" bench mount press that I bought on sale about 6 years ago. You don't really need a floor mount for working on guitars and they are larger, heavier and more expensive. I bolted mine to a Craftsman leg set (I bolted two pieces of MDF on top of the stand, then bolted the press to that) and it seems very stable.

    For a drill press, I don't think it matters too much whether it's a Ryobi, Craftsman, Delta, Grizzly or whatever.
     
  3. jkingma

    jkingma Super Moderator Staff Member

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    I've got a fairly large benchtop unit that I built a stand for. So its basically a floor model the way I have it set up. The base I built is fairly heavy so it doesn't need to be secured to the floor, but if I was using it on my workbench I sure would bolt it down.

    Mine is a "King" and it was only around $100 about 8 years ago.
     
  4. spacey

    spacey Tele-Meister

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    depends, i prefer floor models but if you're only doing short stuff a bench will work. do try to find one with a deep throat, for string-through, p.u. rough-out, contour sanding etc. ryobi's are ok for very light jobs, bad casting and bearings tho. if you want something cool look around for an old atlas or delta, older craftman's can be good too.
    have fun !
     
  5. Bikersluggo

    Bikersluggo Tele-Holic

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    I picked up a radial arm drill press last night from a guy an c-list. It's a bench top model but has plenty of throat depth for guitar work. The radial arm allows the spindle to post depth to change as well as allowing the spindle head to rotate. I haven't seen anything like it on sale new at any of the big home improvement stores. If you're not in a big hurry, craigslist is always a good option.
     
  6. Jellecaster

    Jellecaster Friend of Leo's

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    I've owned this Delta 12" for a couple of years and absolutely love it: (click)

    Just make sure your's is at least 12". I can't see a need for a floor model for building guitars unless you just don't have enough bench space.
     
  7. mudbean

    mudbean Friend of Leo's

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    Yeah, I've seen those DP300L units, too - did you bolt yours to the bench? Do you use it for spindle sanding, too?

    mud
     
  8. Colt W. Knight

    Colt W. Knight Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    I prefer a floor mount.

    Reasons
    1. Doesn't take up valuable bench space which is ussually limited.
    2. You can get big or awkward work pieces in a floor mount that sometimes benchmounts won't accomodate.
    3. You can position a floor mount drill press so that if your are drilling long pieces, you wont worry about hitting walls or other stuff.
    4. I typically like the eye level of a floor mount better than bench mount.
    5. Ussually they are a bit more heavy duty. A lot exceptions here though.
     
  9. JoeSixPack74

    JoeSixPack74 TDPRI Member

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    I have used both floor and bench mount. I prefer the floor mount as I rebuild Jeeps also. Its one of those tools once you have it you can't remember how you lived with out it. Like a welder. I do not bolt mine to the floor. The bench top I had I did bolt to a bench. Don't buy the cheap Harbor Freight, Northern or other cheap junk out there. Buy a name brand. It all has to do with the chuck, if it is cheap crap it will not drill accurate holes. Craftsman is ok/good quality and will serve you well.


    :p
     
  10. spacey

    spacey Tele-Meister

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    ah man, i missed that one !! great tool for guitar work ....
     
  11. Jellecaster

    Jellecaster Friend of Leo's

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    I was going to bolt it, but it is so heavy it wasn't necessary - never had a problem. I don't use it for spindle sanding because I bought one of those Grizzly spindle sanders that Buckocaster showed in the epic "Buttercaster" project thread.
     
  12. Robbied_216

    Robbied_216 Tele-Afflicted

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    Funny, I just got back from looking in some hardware stores. One store I looked in had this nice floor mount press, can't remember sizes though, with the laser alignment.
    When the time comes for me to pull the trigger on one, I will probably go floor standing for the same reasons that were noted above. I have a bench mount at work I use to "customising" equipment and modifying things, but the problem with the bench mounts are is if you are trying to get an awkward piece in there, can sometimes be difficult. I also like the fact that a floor standing press can live anywhere you like in your workshop. Its not limited to being on your workbench, which is good for me as I like to try and keep the wood shavings etc. as far away from my main workbench as possible, as I use it for alot of electronics work and get frustrated with the sawdust everywhere.

    For me with tools, its a case of I'll spend whatever I need to in order to get the most suitable tool for the job. I wont skimp on something if I believe that a more expensive option will serve my needs better. Once you have them, you generally have them for a really long time.
     
  13. Shepherd

    Shepherd Friend of Leo's

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    I just got this General 14" drill press and built a cabinet for it cause the floor model was too low for me. The way I see it a floor model wastes space cause you cant store anything under it. With that table on there I'd be losing 2' of floor space anyway so I built the cabinet to store my bits and other tools plus it's easy to move around if needed. I cant see myself ever needing a floor model but in a pinch I can swivel the head 90 degrees so it's overhanging the cabinet for anything over 3'. I'd pass on the Ryobi, buddy had one and the runout was so bad it was barely useable.
    DSC00182.jpg
     
  14. Jack Wells

    Jack Wells Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    I bought the Delta 12 in. bench top model before they started putting the laser and the light and the tool tray on them. Paid more than they're selling for currently. I went so far as to purchase and add a laser ......... what a waste ...... I never use it.

    If you stop a think about the laser you should realize how unnecessary it is. If you have it properly aligned it gives you a red crosshair to show you where the bit will drill the hole in your work. You can more accurately find that spot by just lowering the bit.

    I built this drill press table which I've found to be very useful. I glued two pieces of 3/4 in. melemine together.

    ......[​IMG]
    ......[​IMG]

    The cut-out in the center was routed 1/2 in. deep. This allows me to put in various inserts made from 1/2 in MDF.

    ......[​IMG]
     
  15. Colt W. Knight

    Colt W. Knight Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    One thing to keep in mind when purchasing a drill press is motor size. While motor size doesn't mean much of anything drilling through wood or sheet metal, it becomes important if you plan on doing any metal work.
     
  16. Mystic6

    Mystic6 TDPRI Member

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    I purchased the Ryobi 12" model at Home Depot a couple months ago as an upgrade to an 8" Craftsman I've had for years. I wanted the flexibility of the benchtop, but the thing is too darn heavy to be moving around. So I built a stand and put it on a mobile base. One of these days when I'm done remodeling my kitchen I'll get back to the basement to continue my guitar building. I plan on closing in the base so I can use it to store my drilling accessories.
     
  17. mudbean

    mudbean Friend of Leo's

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    Thanks, guys! Sounds like not much confidence in Ryobi ... I grew up going to Sears with Dad on Saturday afternoons on Long Island - Craftsman tools will always have a warm spot in my heart (and they make good stuff, too ... at least they did in the olden days). Speaking of old days and old stuff - the CL has been beddy, beddy, good to me as of late. I'll browse The List.

    Great points made by all re: benchtop vs floor model ... I'll have to chew on that for a bit, assess my "workshop" (garage) logistics.

    Jack, oy! Great photos and solutions, as always!

    mud is happy :D
     
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