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Dremel Router Base - A (nearly) Scottish Approach

Discussion in 'The DIY Tool Shed' started by mrz80, Apr 21, 2014.

  1. mrz80

    mrz80 Tele-Meister Silver Supporter

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    I reached the point in my 12 string stage acoustic build where I needed to cut the channel for the soundhole rosette, and didn't want to shell out the major bucks for StewMac's Dremel router base and circle cutting attachment. So let's see what we can cobble together from a few bucks worth of Home Cheapot hardware and some scraps. If this works out, then I'll order some UHMW plastic to make a better second version.

    A little bit of brainstorming comes up with a working sketch...

    [​IMG]

    Let's see if the MDF is solid enough to take threads. I guess, in retrospect, dropping 30 bucks on that M19-2.0 tap sort of negates the economy aspect of this project, huh? Oh well. At least I've got it now in case I come up with some other cool use for the Moto-tool that would require a weird fixture.

    [​IMG]

    That seems to have worked fairly well. I'm not sure about the long-term durability of the thread job, but at least the Dremel fits and tightens down nicely.

    [​IMG]

    Got the holes drilled for the steel rods on which the circle-cutting pivot point will ride.

    [​IMG]

    And here it is all together. There really isn't enough material for the locking thumbscrews to thread into, so I think I'll epoxy some nuts onto the base and the pivot piece. It's tough to see, but the carrier piece rests on a second set of wingnuts. I also determined that the carrier piece was a tad too bulky, so I trimmed it down on the bandsaw from 3/4" to 1/2" thick.

    [​IMG]

    And already a difficulty presents itself: the base and pivot pieces were too big. The minimum radius is a shade over 2", which is too big. So, I took a little off the edges of the base and pivot with the bandsaw, got rid of most of the bulk on the carrier, and epoxied down the aforementioned nuts so the lock screws had something more reliable to thread into. Thus comes into existence the Mark Ia router base, which will get down to just over 1" radius, and is just a hair less unwieldy.

    [​IMG]

    Grapbbed a chunk of scrap pine for a quick test run just to prove to myself the thing was function. Still butt-ugly, but yes, functional. :D

    [​IMG]
     
  2. RogerC

    RogerC Poster Extraordinaire

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    Nice work.

    *bookmarks page for future pirating*
     
  3. BartS

    BartS Friend of Leo's

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    Hate to say it because I'm not a big fan of ca glue but you could ca glue those threads to toughen them up a bit. Nice work by the way.
     
  4. mrz80

    mrz80 Tele-Meister Silver Supporter

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    I was wondering about that. Have to give it a try.
     
  5. Tom Pettingill

    Tom Pettingill Tele-Holic

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    The water thin CA is great for toughening up threads in MDF and also in wood too. That stuff really soaks in deep.
     
  6. Nick JD

    Nick JD Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Nice work!

    Another way to mount the dremel is to use the plastic retainer nut as the thread - place it in an oversize hole and then epoxy it in there.

    [​IMG]

    The goopy stuff in the nut thread is wax used to stop any epoxy entering the threads.
     
  7. Davecam48

    Davecam48 Friend of Leo's Ad Free Member

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    If you have a decent hardware/industrial supplies outlet where you are, ask them for some 3/4"BSF (British Standard Fine ) nuts. They are the correct thread for the dremel. I use them all the time making jigs etc. without stuffing up your original nut.
    I cut them in half (thickness wise) and then press fit and epoxy them into the jig.
     
  8. Nick JD

    Nick JD Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    That's right, Dave! I must go get a pen and write that down!

    3/4 BSF, 3/4 BSF..:D
     
  9. Davecam48

    Davecam48 Friend of Leo's Ad Free Member

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    :lol: Sounds like me trying to remember something Nack....errr Nock..... errr George.....;)

    If you like we have a great industrial supply place here where I got mine, and the last time they still had a few left. I could get you some if you like.

    DC
     
  10. Nick JD

    Nick JD Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Just realised I need the dremel extension nut not the tool's nut. Got two dremel extension-powered tools where I clamp the entension handle ... and they are difficult to align. My fret slotting table has been converted to a thread to hold the extension, and the difference in precision is noticable. Occasionally I got a bit of blade wandering - not good when cutting fretslots!

    The reason I use the extension is the dremel hides away from the CF dust, which ya don't want inside an electric motor. Probably should convert to air tools. I wonder if there's an air-powered dremel?
     
  11. R. Stratenstein

    R. Stratenstein Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Funny you should ask, Nick. . . They're called die grinders. Not sure if any of them come with the threaded neck for easy mounting in jigs, etc., and most of them have fairly large collets--typically around 6 mm, not sure what tapers are available for them, but they're comparable in most ways (speed, HP, etc. to Dremels)

    Here's a cheapo one right down your way-- http://www.supercheapauto.com.au/online-store/products/Blackridge-Air-Die-Grinder-6mm.aspx?pid=340370#Cross
     
  12. Nick JD

    Nick JD Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    AH HA! Thanks for that! That's exactly what I was thinking. :D I'd get a lot more torque than a 100W dremel I s'pose too ... which could be scary, but way faster. With the dremel I have to take little bites.

    Never knew the proper name for a Dremel is a "die grinder"!
     
  13. R. Stratenstein

    R. Stratenstein Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    I think some bright marketing wizz at the Dremel company said,
    "y'know, these electric die grinders we can only sell to industrial tool and die shops? I think we can create a wider market for them--put together a few extra tools other than grinders and burrs, and call it a--hmm- - -rotary tool, yeah, that's the ticket, a Dremel Rotary Tool. Sell them to homeowners, hobby carvers and the like."

    I have a very old one, black bakelite case and all, that was my grandfather's. He was a--guess what--tool and die maker. Unfortunately the tool is trashed, and parts are no longer available for it.
     
  14. trev333

    trev333 Telefied Ad Free Member

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    yeh, air powered die grinders are great.... I used them a lot in industry....

    grinding off metals and fiberglass..... plenty of good bits available..... get one with a full metal body....
     
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