Dorothy on TBS

John Backlund

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In the mid-late 1950's, when I was a kid, my grandparents, who I lived with most of the time back then, would drive out to friends of theirs, Unabelle and Stewart Carson's farm from town (Pipestone, Minnesota) to watch The Wizard of Oz with them. It was an annual event, and the film was shown at the same time every year, I believe it was in the deep winter.

They would have supper there, then everyone would go to the living room when the movie started, and Unabelle would serve bowls of vanilla ice cream with a special cherry or strawberry sauce on it. I loved it.

We would watch the movie, the adults would visit some more, then head back to town in my grandfather's 1950 Nash Ambassador. I can still imagine the cold, cold, snow crunching beneath the Nash's tires as we drove out of the Carson's farm on their long gravel driveway as I huddled in the back seat in the sharp cold of a Minnesota's winter night.

The wicked witch's army of flying monkeys always scared me back then.

I haven't watched the movie for many years, but still I always associate it with my grandparents and Unabelle's ice cream toppings.
 

micpoc

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Am I the only one who still watches The Wizard of Oz on TBS every Thanksgiving?
I love that the tradition still exists and that someone took it over from the networks (think it was CBS that showed it annually?), but there is a stunning 4K Blu Ray of it now that will almost certainly upstage any broadcast version.

I do not have cable anymore but, if I did, I'd probably drop in and watch for awhile.
 

Chester P Squier

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I thought Thanksgiving Day TV was always football!

To me, the scariest thing about The Wizard of Oz is the tornado. When gray clouds in the sky look like the black-and-what closing credits, that can make me a little nervous.

And I've never actually seen a tornado. Well, maybe one waterspout over Lake Pontchartrain one time, away off in the distance.
 

arlum

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This time of year if I walk into a room and it's on I'll sit down and watch it. I don't look for it or forward to it but a lifetime of habit is hard to break.
 

howardlo

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When I was a kid in the 50’s we would watch it on TV fairly often (of course that was on a nearly round 10” screen). In my early teens we went to see it at a movie theater. Have to say my sister and I were amazed that when she got to Oz that it was in COLOR! We had seen it many times prior and until then had never known that. Had always assumed it was a B&W movie, as many were back then.
 
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nojazzhere

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Am I the only one who still watches The Wizard of Oz on TBS every Thanksgiving?
My first experience in musical theater was when a brother and I were in a summer stock production of The Wizard of Oz at the Casa Manana Theater. There was a "cattle call" audition for kids to play the Munchkins, we were accepted, and that began several years of performing at Casa. The different stars were all talented but little-known actors, except one.....our Wicked Witch of the West was the ORIGINAL star in the film, Margaret Hamilton. I still have a program she signed for me. She was the sweetest and kindest lady I ever met. She was so patient with us kids. (all of whom knew squat about theater productions) Her own performance was a blend of "menace" and "tongue-in-cheek" humor. I think by that stage in her life (1961) she was mostly traveling around the world, reprising her best-known role for regional theaters. Meeting and working with her is a wonderful memory of my youth.
And to answer your question.....I RARELY ever watch The Wizard of Oz on TV anymore.
 

unixfish

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My mother always wanted us to watch "The Sound Of Music" on TV - I seem to remember it was on around Easter? I got sick of that movie quickly.

The Wizard Of Oz - twice was enough for that one. Yeah, a decent movie, but meh - waaaaaaay over it.

There are very few movies I will watch more that two or three times, much to my family's dismay. They want to watch Marvel movies over and over.
 

GeneB

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Used to way back when we had cable. We also watched A Christmas Story every year too.
 

Greggorios

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It was an annual event, and the film was shown at the same time every year, I believe it was in the deep winter.

I remember it the same way. It's probably one of my earliest memories of looking forward to something I really loved. I'd wait all year for it. I remember bugging my parents..."HOW long till Wizard of Oz comes on?" I can't think of any other movie that was as big a deal...at least for those times. "March of the Wooden Soldiers" was a close second.

The wicked witch's army of flying monkeys always scared me back then.

Me too. The last time I watched it, many years back, I could still recall being so scared as a 4-5 year old.

The other thing that stands out was the transition from black and white to full color when Dorothy wakes up in Oz/Munchkin-land. So very effective for the time it was made.
 

Telekarster

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In the mid-late 1950's, when I was a kid, my grandparents, who I lived with most of the time back then, would drive out to friends of theirs, Unabelle and Stewart Carson's farm from town (Pipestone, Minnesota) to watch The Wizard of Oz with them. It was an annual event, and the film was shown at the same time every year, I believe it was in the deep winter.

They would have supper there, then everyone would go to the living room when the movie started, and Unabelle would serve bowls of vanilla ice cream with a special cherry or strawberry sauce on it. I loved it.

We would watch the movie, the adults would visit some more, then head back to town in my grandfather's 1950 Nash Ambassador. I can still imagine the cold, cold, snow crunching beneath the Nash's tires as we drove out of the Carson's farm on their long gravel driveway as I huddled in the back seat in the sharp cold of a Minnesota's winter night.

The wicked witch's army of flying monkeys always scared me back then.

I haven't watched the movie for many years, but still I always associate it with my grandparents and Unabelle's ice cream toppings.

John, I can relate to just about everything you say here! Almost like I was there with you! We did the same sort of thing, every year, and freezing in the back seat as the tires crunch the snow and ice :confused: The monkey's freaked me out too ;) We own the special addition bluray disc today, and carry on with the tradition of watching it every year.... except we don't have to freeze anymore :cool:
 




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