Doing my own basic setup and struggling with open G buzz

Discussion in 'Tele-Technical' started by AJ Ray, Jul 18, 2020.

  1. AJ Ray

    AJ Ray Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    178
    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2012
    Location:
    dundee
    Any advice for me. Have tried setting truss rod and have an action of 2.32 at 12th fret across all strings as close as I can make out. I have some annoying buzz on open g string which doesnt resolve even when I raise to extreme height. No obvious rattle when fretted though.
    Saddles on my guitar dont seem to be the best as the little screws dont sit straight. I have tried to adjust so that they are touching bridge plate and are not the cause of the rattle.
    Any hints or tips?
     
  2. tfarny

    tfarny Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    5,138
    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2008
    Location:
    Hudson Valley, NY
    The problem goes away when you fret, and adjusting at the bridge doesn't do anything?
    It sounds like the buzz might be coming from your nut. The G string on a Fender guitar has insufficient angle behind the nut, and this can produce buzzing and sustain issues. Try using a second string tree to get more break angle, that can help make your guitar sound better in a lot of cases even without buzzing. Otherwise you might need a new nut if you can't repair the one you've got - which is definitely possible to do at home, it just takes a few tools and some careful work.
     
  3. Wallaby

    Wallaby Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    2,183
    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2018
    Location:
    Here
    You could try physically depressing the G string behind the nut and see if the buzz changes?

    If it does, as tfarny suggests, another string tree might help. Another approach might be to leave more windings on the peg for the G string and see if it helps.
     
    AAT65, Preacher and Kevin Wolfe like this.
  4. Peegoo

    Peegoo Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    8,897
    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2019
    Location:
    Between the Raindrops
    Before you drill for a string tree, try this:

    Use a .017" - .020" nut file to gently add back angle to the bottom of the G string's nut slot. The idea here is to hold the file at an angle pointing at the bushing on the G string's tuner post.

    Take care to remove no nut material from the bottom of the slot where the string takes off over the frets. You want to remove material only from the back of the nut.

    Use very light pressure, take one or two strokes, and then tune up and check how it sounds. Don't take more than one or two strokes each time between checks, because it's way too easy to take one stroke too much and blow out the nut slot too low.
     
  5. Rbert0005

    Rbert0005 Tele-Meister

    Age:
    71
    Posts:
    125
    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2020
    Location:
    Moved from Mass to South Carolina
    I just installed triple string trees on my Fenders today.
    So far so good, and it did away with the slight harmonic I was getting with my 70s Vintera.

    Stewmac has them for around 6 bucks.

    Bob
     
    goonie likes this.
  6. moosie

    moosie Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

    Age:
    64
    Posts:
    18,079
    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2010
    Location:
    Western Connecticut
    G nut slot is a perennial Fender problem. Not enough break angle / pressure over the nut. I counteract to some degree by winding down the tuner post. Fixing the nut as @Peegoo suggests is the best way, though sometimes that won't work without making a new nut.

    For this reason, I too heartily recommend the triple tree. It's great when you don't want to get too involved, and especially don't care to permanently drill a second hole.
     
  7. Deaf Eddie

    Deaf Eddie Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

    Posts:
    3,284
    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2003
    Location:
    Beautiful Idyllwild, CA
    You can always raise the nut slot on the G string with a little bone dust - or baking powder - and super glue and recut it. OLD TIMER'S TRICK...
     
    Dacious and Kevin Wolfe like this.
  8. AJ Ray

    AJ Ray Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    178
    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2012
    Location:
    dundee
    Thanks for all of the advice folks. I have depressed the string behind the nut with my finger and played the open string and the issue remains. I have noticed that if I pull the string away from the guitar body there is no buzz and if I play the string across the body ( sideways as in normal playing style) the buzz is there.
     
  9. PhredE

    PhredE Tele-Afflicted

    Posts:
    1,421
    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2017
    Location:
    Suburban PDX, OR
    Could you capture a couple pics to show us? A look at the saddle in question up close might help, as well as, one or two of the nut -- maybe from different perspectives?
     
  10. warrent

    warrent Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    3,959
    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2009
    Location:
    toronto
    If you place a capo at the first or second fret does the buzz go away when playing the open G string?
    If it does its the nut,if it doesn't then it's either a high fret or bad saddle. you could try switching the saddles and see if it makes a difference.
     
    PhredE likes this.
  11. AJ Ray

    AJ Ray Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    178
    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2012
    Location:
    dundee
    20200720_211914.jpg 20200720_211943.jpg 20200720_211750.jpg 20200720_211914.jpg 20200720_211943.jpg 20200720_211943.jpg
     
  12. PhredE

    PhredE Tele-Afflicted

    Posts:
    1,421
    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2017
    Location:
    Suburban PDX, OR
    Thanks for the pics. That does help.

    1. ** I am no expert** -- so read on, with that disclaimer in mind..

    2. Peegoo's advice is always very, very good (and the others here too).
    I also agree with Peegoo's advice, to *very modestly* run a nut slot file through the G string slot in the nut exactly as he described.

    3. The break angle for the G and D strings looks very shallow to me (based on the pics). First thing I would try is to increase the angle. A range of options exist:

    >Lower [remove or swap the spacer beneath the tree out -- for a lower one],
    >Use a different [lower] string tree,
    >Move it closer to the nut or add a second tree (closer to nut) on the same pair of strings -- probably least desirable because of drilling another hole, etc.

    I'm probably missing an important one, but you get the idea.
    I'd bet if you did both, everything would be a-ok in the end.

    It wouldn't hurt to check the saddle and adjuster screws. Make sure all the contact surfaces are free of burrs and are smooth and that the screws sit flat/flush on the bridgeplate too.

    Edit: after zooming in on your pics a second time, another thing that *might* be at partly responsible.. your G string might be getting pinched in it's slot in the nut.
    warrent's suggestion with a capo would help to determine if the nut is the culprit. If you've got one, go give that a try.
     
    Last edited: Jul 20, 2020
    Peegoo likes this.
  13. Peegoo

    Peegoo Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    8,897
    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2019
    Location:
    Between the Raindrops
    Also try this:

    Click on the pic to expand it a bit.

    [​IMG]
     
    Geo, Henley, kris ford and 6 others like this.
  14. AJ Ray

    AJ Ray Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    178
    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2012
    Location:
    dundee
    For sure when I capoed the strings all strings sounded less crisp and more tinny but with no buzzing There is always a tiny bit of buzz on low e when played hard but nothing like the g string. I find the low e acceptable with the action as is and it's not an issue. The g string is unnacesptable but the capo cured the buzz.
    To my ear the buzz sounds like it's coming from the last fret and I thought maybe I has a fret issue but I presume if this was the case the issue would have been worse with the capo on?
     
  15. AJ Ray

    AJ Ray Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    178
    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2012
    Location:
    dundee
    Looking and after adjusting the saddles the adjustmentcscews twisted bit and the saddles dont just move up and down. They lean and the screws almost twist in their holes. Wierd
     
  16. Wallaby

    Wallaby Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    2,183
    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2018
    Location:
    Here
    To summarize - the buzz goes away when you capo at the 1st fret?
     
  17. reckless meanie

    reckless meanie Tele-Holic

    Posts:
    515
    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2011
    Location:
    Bend, OR
    Could the G slot in the nut be cut so it’s angled towards the fret board? If so I’m sure that would cause buzzing. Either that or it’s too wide for the string that will also cause buzzing. Those are the only two things I can think of that would cause it.
     
    PhredE likes this.
  18. reckless meanie

    reckless meanie Tele-Holic

    Posts:
    515
    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2011
    Location:
    Bend, OR
    You could also take the spacer out from under the string tree and lower the tree so it’s closer to the head stock. That might help.
     
    PhredE likes this.
  19. PhredE

    PhredE Tele-Afflicted

    Posts:
    1,421
    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2017
    Location:
    Suburban PDX, OR
    Hmmm.. Could they be corroded/rusted? Could the screw threads be stripped?

    Like others have said, I would definitely give some attention to the nut -- just to eliminate that as a possible cause. The [descent] angle of the G string slot is very important as is the height of the G+D string tree.
     
  20. Peegoo

    Peegoo Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    8,897
    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2019
    Location:
    Between the Raindrops
    This is an exaggerated example of nut slots and how the bottoms should be profiled...but it makes it easy to visualize how they need to be.

    [​IMG]
     
IMPORTANT: Treat everyone here with respect, no matter how difficult!
No sex, drug, political, religion or hate discussion permitted here.