Dog won't walk on bridges

Ted Keane

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I have 2 Boston Terriers,and one of them just stopped walking on a bridge,or a road that goes over a stream,or over a culvert.I don't know how he knows to stop.He's low to the ground and you can't see the bridge or the road.He just stops right before the bridge,and I have to carry him over.Never used to do this.He's 3 years old,and only started this this summer.Any ideas why he does this?
 

BB

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I have 2 Boston Terriers,and one of them just stopped walking on a bridge,or a road that goes over a stream,or over a culvert.I don't know how he knows to stop.He's low to the ground and you can't see the bridge or the road.He just stops right before the bridge,and I have to carry him over.Never used to do this.He's 3 years old,and only started this this summer.Any ideas why he does this?

He does it for one reason only.....He's a Bostie!!

Our granddog is a two year old Boston Terrier. Now, I'm a life long dog lover....my wife says I'm part dog, (or cat, depending who we are visiting) I won't dispute that, but I digress.

Out of the many dog's I've had over the years, never had the pleasure of spending any time with the terrier breed. Plus, the very few Boston's I've seen over my years has been very few. I thought they were (pardon me!) ugly little rat dogs.

I fell in love with Coco at first bite. She is so stinking smart, it's scary. There are several things (like the bridge deal) she just won't do...nothing, not even for her great love of food and treats.

I could go on all night about how we all love and adore this little sweet creature. She has helped me through a lot of physical and mental problems for the past two years. Anyway, Boston Terrier = amazing family dog.
 

Refugee

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he is using his nose which tells him there is a body of water nearby. Dogs smell everything. Seems to me that you can probably train that fear out of him. Take him swimming. Immerse him in water and see how he dies. I am betting dog paddle his way and the great mystery will be solved and he'll no longer fear it.
 

drf64

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I think it’s a sign! I wouldn’t cross either!
1666064186313.png

That was the premise of a Twilight Zone episode, "The Hunt"
 

BigDaddyLH

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There's a footbridge near my house and Harley won't cross it during the freshet. Then there's enough water to move good-sized rocks and crack them against each other, and that freaks him out.
 

arlum

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I don't have an answer but you're not alone. We used to own a trio of Japanese Chins that I would walk to the neighborhood park at least once a day. The only way to the park was to cross a foot bridge over a creek. One of the three dogs would just freeze up at the entrance to the bridge and I'd always have to pick him up and carry him across while the other two just walked right across. I never figured it out. It started happening around the time he reached one and a half years of age and it never went away.
 

Peegoo

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I've seen this happen a few times. I think it may be the way a bridge resonates and the dog can feel that in their feet. They sense danger.

This can be easily trained out of most dogs because food motivation is a pretty strong compulsion. Place their favorite treat about three feet out on the bridge and they will usually move forward, grab it, and return. Do this three or four times, but keep the distance to about three feet. And end the training session (don't cross the bridge). The next day, increase the distance a little, to about 10 feet. And continue until you're all the way across.

If they're not food-motivated, a favorite toy will do the same thing.

Picking up and carrying a dog that can otherwise walk just fine is a case of the dog training you :oops:
 




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