Does this need a neck reset?

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by MerleJam, Jan 14, 2019.

  1. MerleJam

    MerleJam Tele-Meister

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    No not at all. I enjoy the laughs.
     
  2. Toto'sDad

    Toto'sDad Telefied Ad Free Member

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    You know DW, it's just hard to keep from making a crack about a guy who's six feet three, and weighs over three hundred pounds with that little tiny mandolin cradled in his hands like a new born baby.
     
  3. Toto'sDad

    Toto'sDad Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Are you even in jest suggesting that one single thread posted on the Bad Dog hasn't spiraled off into something unrecognizable if it runs as many as three pages?
     
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  4. jhundt

    jhundt Doctor of Teleocity

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    ha ha! you got me there TD!
     
  5. D_W_PGH

    D_W_PGH Friend of Leo's

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    And they're so sore about it. You just can't resist antagonizing. When I attempted to play banjo (it'll be just like guitar, right?...maybe if you're doyle dykes), I instantly heard all kinds of banjo jokes and my spouse went right to "that's the most annoying thing I ever heard, why do you have to play it over and over?". Guitar is melody, phrasing, etc. Banjo is reflex and spasm.

    So much for that. I'm a spaz, but I don't have the reflexes for it. But I took my jokes in stride - it was a lot easier to take them in stride when I wasn't forced to walk around with a tiny little instrument looking like andre the giant playing a ukulele.
     
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  6. noah330

    noah330 Friend of Leo's

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    One thing I learned when I got into older Martin guitars is that they were built to be taken apart easily. The older Gibson stuff is similar in that regard but Martin really were built to be serviced.

    Back then the big brands weren't about a bunch of imported junk it was about making a lifetime superior product.
     
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  7. Toto'sDad

    Toto'sDad Telefied Ad Free Member

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    The banjo can be very dangerous to take out in some social circumstances. People go into the burn him at the stake mode, and quickly gather rope, kerosene, pitchforks, and then they start drinking whiskey. It's all downhill from there.
     
  8. bender66

    bender66 Poster Extraordinaire

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    Can't make out anything in those pics. There's no use wondering.

    I just got an Alvarez back from gifting it to a friend. They just had a baby & so returned it to me. I forgot how nice it was to play, old strings & all. It was my first guitar.
     
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  9. MerleJam

    MerleJam Tele-Meister

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    I asked them for this picture and a picture of the straight edge test but they only sent this
     

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  10. schmee

    schmee Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    Hard to tell for sure but that bridge insert looks like it's already adjusted pretty low.. especially the high E side....
     
  11. Toto'sDad

    Toto'sDad Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I should have mentioned this, maybe someone else has already. Have them measure the strings from the top of the fret at the 12th fret to the bottom of the strings without touching them. That should tell the tale. Even a tape measure will work if they take into account the end of the tape. A machinist rule that measures in 32nds would be perfect! Whatever they use if it's more than 7/16ths with the amount of saddle you have left, it most likely needs a neck reset, but I already thought it did anyway, but that would confirm my thinking. For myself I don't like the strings much over 5/32nds even on an acoustic, but bluegrassers will always want the bass strings up around 3/8ths, maybe even 7/16ths, but they mostly play on the first five frets. Playing with the strings that high causes tuning issues too, but that's another discussion.
     
  12. MerleJam

    MerleJam Tele-Meister

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    The customer support is closed and won’t open again until after the auction is over. The closest thing to that was this picture with the ruler on the 13-14 fret and it doesn’t appear to be on top of the frets. I can’t tell much about the actual height
     

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  13. william tele

    william tele Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    It's really hard to know anything without actually holding the guitar and doing your own measurements but if you can get it cheap enough a bridge shave (not just saddle) can get you some life and a $30 Bridge Doctor can help as well. I managed to make my old Yamaha playable again with just the Bridge Doctor truss install. I know how you feel about old Japanese (and in my case, Taiwan) guitars. They are a bargain if you get em' cheap enough and can get by with one of the above fixes. I'd be comfortable doing the bridge shave some may not.
     
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  14. MerleJam

    MerleJam Tele-Meister

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    With shipping i would have 225-250 in it. 34 min left on auction. Hard decision
     
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  15. william tele

    william tele Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    There's many, many out there. Don't feel like you missed "the one"...:)
     
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  16. kafka

    kafka Tele-Afflicted

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    OK, so, just a couple of points of fact here. Stradivari didn't make modern violins. He made Baroque violins. Every single Stradivarius except one had it's original Baroque neck chopped off and replaced with a modern neck in the early 19th century. It was a fairly different instrument when it was first made. You can look up the differences.

    Stradivari was kind of the Howard Dumble of his day, the difference being that he was very prolific. People were copying him during his lifetime. His customers were the royalty. But, that's mostly for his output after 1700, when he perfected his own style. Previously, he experimented considerably with the proportions, including the "Long" Strads, which are generally considered to be a failed experiment. These aren't particularly desireable, at least not compared with his 'Golden Period' violins.

    He was also equally known for his development of the cello

    As far as maintenence goes, I wonder how much one needs in 18th century Europe without central heating. I'm going to guess a good bit less.
     
    Last edited: Jan 15, 2019
  17. moosie

    moosie Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    But what if the aliens have but a single banjo player?
     
  18. Toto'sDad

    Toto'sDad Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I tried looking at the pic through a looking glass (magnifier) with the pic enlarged on my 24" computer screen. It seems to me as if the strings are at least 5/16 high on the first string (little E) They don't look as bad in this pic as they did in some of the others. I'll leave you to decide from William Tele's suggestion.

    It's hard to make apple pie out of horse apples. I wouldn't give that much for the guitar unless I could actually hold it in my hands. You may have made a decision by now. There are other remedies than a neck reset, plaining down the fret board taking the hump out of it, and doing a re-fret. Unfortunately you end up with the same money as a neck reset, and after having gone that route, I would not go that way again.

    Also as WT said, there are others out there. Having said that, I'm well aware of that burning sensation you get when you have the hots for something.
     
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  19. william tele

    william tele Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    I did know a luthier in the midwest that did a lot of bridge shaving on Martins...just because it was easy and the worst case is you eventually have to reset the neck and replace the bridge anyway. But it really is not that cost effective to pay for a neck reset on 70's entry and mid level Japanese guitars...I don't think.
     
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