Does anyone here use a CPAP machine?

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by Califiddler, Oct 6, 2005.

  1. Califiddler

    Califiddler Friend of Leo's

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    I just went through a sleep study and was diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnea. My sleep was being disturbed 69 times per hour. My doctor has prescribed a CPAP (Continuous Positive Air Pressure) machine, where you wear a mask to bed at night and the machine blows air down your throat. He prescribed a type that automatically adjusts the pressure throughout the night.
    I should get it within the next couple of weeks.

    My only experience with this CPAP machine was during the second half of the sleep study, for about 3.5 hours. Does anyone here use one? Does it help? Any advice or tricks of the trade in using one?

    Thanks a lot.
     
  2. beez

    beez Tele-Holic

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    Yeah...I have one. Got mine in early 2003. Tough son of a gun to get used to sleeping with, but after the early adjustment period, I can't sleep without mine. I sleep better, feel better overall in the morning, and I don't bother anyone else who is sleeping with me.
     
  3. Joe-Bob

    Joe-Bob Doctor of Teleocity

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    Make sure it has some kind of humidifier, even a passive one. Also, there are about 500,000,000,000 different kinds of masks. More than half are just terrible. I got a new Swift, it's great. Also, double-check if the insurance actually covers it, the doctor's office will always tell you they do, but those machines are well over a grand, and you don't want to have to pay for it out of pocket.
     
  4. telefunken

    telefunken Friend of Leo's

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    Usually most insurances only require a sleep study and a doctors prescription. I supply patients with them. I work for a medical supply company, and 95% of the time they are covered by most insurances. As long as you have over 30 episodes of Apnea each lasting more than 10 seconds. If you find it hard to sleep with the CPAP ask your doctor about a BIPAP(Bi-Level Positive Airway Pressure), it's suppose to be more comfortable.
     
  5. KokoTele

    KokoTele Doctor of Teleocity Vendor Member

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    I have used one as well. I have very mild sleep apnea and for a long time complained to my doctor about not feeling rested after I slept. The day after a sleep study using a CPAP I felt great and had energy all day. But for some reason I can't get used to the thing at home, and I keep waking up finding that I've taken the mask off in my sleep. These days I'm lucky to be in bed for 6 hours anyway, so I stopped using the machine because it takes me longer to fall asleep.

    The gel masks seem to be the best. There are cannula types as well that are less obtrusive, but a respiratory therapist that I used to work with told me that those only work for people that use low pressures. If you need a higher pressure (say, above 10 or 12), the gel masks are probably best.

    The BiPAP lowers the pressure when you exhale, making it more comfortable to use the thing.
     
  6. Rich Rice

    Rich Rice Poster Extraordinaire

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    I have over 800 apneas in any given night. Hate my cpap machine. I only use it when I go out overnight on gigs, so my bandmates don't have to listen to me snoring. I sound like a freight train crossed with a chain saw. I seldom get more than a couple of hous sleep at a time, and have been immobilized by sleep apnea. I get more restful sleep with the mask, but it has to be on really tight in order to stay sealed against my face, due to high pressure levels required. This causes pain, which wakes me up. Puts funny wrinkles in my face, which last for hours the next day. Causes skin irritation, generally chapped skin, then I start breaking out in the irritated spots. I usually rip it off and throw it on the floor when I'm asleep, but at least others can get to sleep while I have it on, and (hopefully) stay asleep once I tear it off in exasperation.
    My condition is complicated by 10 years of undiagnosed hypothyroidism, which caused massive weight gain, along with the passage of time. The overweight condition, with an underproductive thyroid, put more of a strain on my breathing, and my soft pallete(sp?) folds back to cause an obstruction to the airway. I was unable to work, drive, or even get off the La-Z-Boy for more than ten minutes. I would fall asleep in the middle of a word, driving down the highway at 80 mph. The synthroid straightened some of it out, but now I can't lose the weight. I was never heavy until right after my 35th birthday, then I simply exploded. I went from 175 and a muscular build to 225 lbs of whatever the hell I am now... For the years between ages 35 and 45, I attributed the weight gain to slowing metabolism and age. Little did I know I had these other issues. When everything got out of control, I finally found a specialist who figured out how and why I got this way. Between the meds and the machine (when I use it) I'm back up and fiesty once more.
    I've dealt with this for the past 5 years, and the cpap makes a great deal of difference in my overall thinking, and energy level. Simply put, it works but I HATE it. Imagine going to bed, trying to do a little romancing, all the while looking like the Pillsbury doughboy crossed with Darth Vader. Most nights I just sleep on the couch. It's easier. Good luck, hope your experience is better than mine.
     
  7. tellypicker

    tellypicker Tele-Meister

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    have one and use is since 2002. it took a little while to get used to sleeping with the mask on, but the benefit of being able to sleep on my back as much as i'd like far outweighs the discomfort of a mask. i get much better sleep, a full 7 hours every night now and don't wake up in the middle of the night anymore. nice restfull sleep.
     
  8. john s

    john s Tele-Meister

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    sleep apnea

    My wife suffers as you do but after a trial period using the mask, she hated it and removed it in her sleep. She has now had a dental bridge made that locks the top and bottom parts and it can be adjusted with a sort of allen key that actually brings the jaw forward and she (and I)are very pleased with the result. It might be slightly different for us as she has a very rare brain virus called Whipples Disease of which apnea is one of the side effects.
    John
     
  9. zane

    zane Tele-Afflicted

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    I have one for over a year... & the only time I don't use it is if I fall asleep on the couch or something ....
    if your you have sleep apnea you should ALWAYS use it or something else because you CAN DIE IN YOUR SLEEP ...
     
  10. jericho60

    jericho60 formerly ye olde fretmonkey

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    My wife has a real problem with apnea and recently started on the CPAP; she's been reading this thread with great interest.
     
  11. Coyote

    Coyote Tele-Meister

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    Re: sleep apnea

    What is that?
     
  12. john s

    john s Tele-Meister

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    Whipples Disease

    Hi Coyote,
    Whipples is a virus that starts in the small intestine (don't know where it comes from!) and spreads to the major organs in the body. My wife just collapsed one day ..never had a problem before..and gave all the symptoms of a seizure. After 7 weeks in intensive care.where we nearly lost her she was finally diagnosed with Whipples.
    The only problem is that she has Whipples of the brain which is so rare that there is only about 20 people in the world that has Whipples of the brain. She has suffered brain damage which shows itself as short term memory loss (problem being ...she can still tell when there is a new Tele in the house.ha.) There is no cure for this disease and not much known about it but is kept in check with massive doses of antibiotics and other boutique drugs that she will have to take for the rest of her life. It is a complete mystery how she came by this but we are blessed she came through it and still have her with us but our lives have been turned around by this and has made us stronger. ( she even thinks I play a mean B bender Tele!!...Ha Ha.) There is a bit of info on the net about Whipples but not too much on the Brain virus.
    Regards John.
     
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