Does anyone here roast their own maple neck blocks?

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by TN Tele, Jul 7, 2021.

  1. TN Tele

    TN Tele Tele-Meister Silver Supporter

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    Looking for recommendations and some how to help. I want to roast my own maple or ash neck wood. My wife doesn't want me using our convection oven in the kitchen, so I am looking for an oven (or alternate) for my workshop. Is anyone doing this themselves and what are you using, times and temps cooking the wood and results. Pictures if you have them.
     
    Last edited: Jul 7, 2021
  2. vhilts1

    vhilts1 Tele-Holic

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    I’ve seen other threads.....low and slow seems to be the idea

    150-200 degrees for multiple hours....some say several hours

    im guessing the easiest and cheapest approach is a used electric oven

    those can be had for $100
     
  3. Telemaestro

    Telemaestro Tele-Holic

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    I’ve always done mine at 350-375F for about 4 hours.
     
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  4. RickyRicardo

    RickyRicardo Friend of Leo's

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    360 for 3 to 4 hours is what I've done in the past.
     
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  5. smoothrecluse

    smoothrecluse Tele-Holic Silver Supporter

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    Could you use a smoker that holds a consistent temp, like an electric pellet smoker? I realize you probably don’t want a smoky neck blank, but there shouldn’t be as much smoke at higher temps like 350-360.
     
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  6. telemnemonics

    telemnemonics Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I've read that "roasting" for torrefication is done with the oxygen removed from the air in the "oven" or kiln.
    Not sure how valid that info is but there seems to be varied info and no agreement on how or exactly why.
     
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  7. RickyRicardo

    RickyRicardo Friend of Leo's

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    Torrified and roasted are 2 different things in my mind. Torrified is used to pre-age the wood ala Martin in a kiln or autoclave and roasted is purely cosmetic. Martin's torrified tops are not colored at all like roasted wood is. So I'm not sure if advertised torrified wood with that darker color is just roasted.
     
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  8. Slowtwitch

    Slowtwitch Tele-Holic

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    I've done 2 necks now, both a huge success. Tell your wife Maple really does nothing, just adds a nice smell of cookies in the kitchen. it needs o be "900" wide oven to fit a blank
    Here's the write up of the first one
    Roasting process.png

    IMG_20210224_144416.jpg

    And end result IMG_20210326_161152.jpg IMG_20210405_093132.jpg
     
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  9. TN Tele

    TN Tele Tele-Meister Silver Supporter

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    Thanks for the info folks, I will report back when I get this going. Thanks.
     
  10. old wrench

    old wrench Friend of Leo's

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    I went into the "home roasting" thing and ran a series of experiments a couple of years ago :).

    About all you can realistically hope to achieve is a color change.

    When you heat the wood for hours in your oven, you quickly drive all the moisture out of it, and then after cooling it absorbs the ambient moisture from the air.

    This really stresses the wood out and if the piece has any tendency to warp - it will - and usually in an exaggerated fashion.

    I found out that in the long run, I was better off dying or staining the wood a tan color, instead of getting a tan color from cooking it ;)



    Torrefication is a totally different process, done at higher temperatures - which is possible because it's done in a reduced oxygen kiln - otherwise, the wood burns.

    After the wood is held at that elevated temperature for the required time, steam is introduced into kiln to stabilize the wood at a reasonable moisture level - this step helps to keep the wood from warping.

    There really isn't a reasonable way to replicate this process using your home oven, but I tried anyhow :)


    .
     
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  11. uriah1

    uriah1 Telefied Gold Supporter

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    I have a campfire going tonight. Maybe should have brought some of my gitfiddles
     
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  12. printer2

    printer2 Poster Extraordinaire

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    Most torrifying of guitar wood is done in regular industrial air ovens. The temperature uniformity has to be pretty good as the conversion temperature is not far below where you off gas volatilizes that can start on fire. Convection heating is a must. Enough past discussion in this forum about it that will get you up to speed. No it is not done in a vacuum, the heat transfer sucks at this low a temperature. An autoclave can be used with a shielding gas and steam in the cycle but that all raises the price above what can be done in a regular air oven. I would not try torrifying in a regular non-convection oven. Well, maybe I would but I spent some time working on industrial ovens.
     
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  13. Greg70

    Greg70 Tele-Meister

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    Drop a couple of salmon fillets on it and tell your wife that you're making maple-plank salmon.
     
  14. printer2

    printer2 Poster Extraordinaire

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    Actually my first acoustic guitar was designed around a piece of cedar sold to cook a salmon on.
     
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