Does a reissue count as a birth year guitar?

1stpitch

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There's no way I would ever spend what it would take to buy a guitar made in my birth year, but, there are tons of reissues out there for affordable money. So... does a reissue really count? I know it's a personal decision, but what is the general consensus of opinion, if there is one?
 

tonfarbe

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No, sorry.
You want a guitar that has been built in the year of your birth and not one that has the same specs but has otherwise nothing to do with your birth year.
Stupid example: When you tell yourself: "I want to grow a bear" you don't go out and purchase somthing like this:
419SPdFxdqL._AC_.jpg


Also: Would a RI really have the same sentimental value to you than the original?
 

TheMicster

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Yes why not, of course it could count.
The realism is that this is an emotional link or association with the instrument and it really is what you personally deem it to be.
However whilst the fact remains that it was not actually built the year of your birth it is still considered an icon worthy of being reproduced and a celebration of the year it was originally released.
Anyway thats my view, the realism is its all about how you personally see it.
 

brookdalebill

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Nope.
They are nice, realistic substitutes, but they are still newer guitars.
Birth year guitars are over rated.
I owned a 57 Tele (my birth year) when I was about 30.
I gave it to a friend.
He liked it more than I did.
Alas, it was stolen from him.
It’s just stuff.
 

swarfrat

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Birth year guitar is a silly internet made up thing. Get what you want and play it. Literally no one but you cares about this instrument. Sure your buddies might go "oooh cool" but I'm not going to spend tens of thousands to make a bunch of old men go "ooh cool".

I spent hundreds of thousands to make one woman go "ooh cool" and I see where that got me. Sure it's gone up in value but I hate the place, it doesn't really work for us. Wouldn't do it again
 
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archetype

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Birth year guitar is a silly internet made up thing. Get what you want and play it. Literally no one but you cares about this instrument. Sure your buddies might go "oooh cool" but I'm not going to spend tens of thousands to make a bunch of old men go "ooh cool".

I spent hundreds of thousands to make one woman go "ooh cool" and I see where that got me. Sure it's gone up in value but I hate the place, it doesn't really work for us. Wouldn't do it again

"bunch of old men"?
 

brookdalebill

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My observation has been the whole birth year guitar thing is men in their 50's and up.
Of course, most of the most coveted guitars were made 50-70 years ago.
There have been precious few classic instruments made since, IMO.
I completely agree it’s a geezer thing.
So, speaking as a geezer, and having owned many cool, older instruments, birth year guitars are over-rated.
The reissue phenomenon of the 1980s through the present is a direct result of the vastly inferior guitars offered by the major manufacturers in the 70s.
It was painfully obvious that Norlin Gibsons, CBS Fenders, and Baldwin Gretsches were not as good as their predecessors.
The great news is that current (new) instruments are incredibly well made, good sounding, and consistently more dependable than ever, IMO.
 




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