Do You Use a Capo?

Discussion in 'Tab, Tips, Theory and Technique' started by P Thought, Apr 30, 2019.

  1. Larmo63

    Larmo63 Tele-Afflicted

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    I can't imagine not at least trying a capo. I've found all kinds of great tones on the fretboard using one, mainly on acoustic but on my Telecaster too.

    I never tune afterwards. I have high quality guitars.
     
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  2. Bob M

    Bob M Tele-Afflicted Ad Free Member

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    Only on an acoustic. Also-I use one to check neck relief!
     
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  3. AJ Love

    AJ Love Friend of Leo's

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    I use a Capo sometimes. My mentors instructed me to use one when playing old school Blues. Capo at the 2nd fret when playing a Delta Blues song in the key of B, that kinda thing.
     
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  4. Whatizitman

    Whatizitman Friend of Leo's

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    You certainly will have to tune after taking off the capo, if you tuned with the capo on. But you don't have to tune with a capo on, if you put it on correctly.

    [​IMG]
     
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  5. bgmacaw

    bgmacaw Friend of Leo's

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  6. jbmando

    jbmando Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    Nope, it doesn't happen. It is the only way I'll use a capo. The strings are not muted and they do not kink.
     
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  7. jbmando

    jbmando Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    No, you don't. See post #41 in this thread.
     
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  8. jbmando

    jbmando Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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  9. chulaivet1966

    chulaivet1966 Tele-Afflicted

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    Top of the morning forumites....

    Back in the 70's I bought one.....jeez, it looked so archaic from the contemporary ones.
    I tried it and I found it cumbersome and limiting my inherent playing style in just moving around the neck when need be.
    I bought another one some years ago to try it again.
    Same feeling...it's an awkward device on the neck that feels limiting and just gets in my way.
    Of course...that is likely a reflection of my guitar playing abilities. :)

    One thing that I didn't care for when trying it out on my '78 Guild D40 is that farther up the neck I place it the chords sound tinny and even bordering on shrill to my ears.
    More like a high pitched mandolin which I don't really care for.
    When playing lead that annoyance was not there.
    Obviously, the kind of music I play/write does not cater to using a capo. (I don't do country or bluegrass)
    If I wanted to learn a song where capo was used I always just transpose to a key I can actually sing (overstatement) in and ditch the capo.

    As others have stated it's just another tool in the kit.
    I can certainly see the appeal/need in some styles of music, certain song and/or one's skill level if entertaining as a solo performer.

    Especially, any genre where the singer has to concentrate on vocals while just playing the open chords for performing ease.
    A "solo performer", I certainly am NOT....I have no courage in that context. :)

    A good day to all....carry on.
     
    Last edited: May 1, 2019
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  10. Flaneur

    Flaneur Friend of Leo's

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    I keep finding almost-new capos, on dark stages and in murky rehearsal spaces. Who decided to make them so.....black? :rolleyes:
     
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  11. GibbyTwin

    GibbyTwin Tele-Meister

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    I absolutely use a capo. Especially when playing Here Comes The Sun, If I Needed Someone, etc. Also, when the note run dictates it (to me) like in a chromatic walk down from 'C' under a 'C' chord but the key is too high or low to sing. I also use it to get a drop 'D' type tuning (except it is in E; capo at 2nd fret over 5 strings only keeping low E string open).
    Lots of creative applications for a capo and using one does not imply lack of ability. :)
     
  12. ale.istotle

    ale.istotle Tele-Meister

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    In the spirit of changing voicing for a mood or effect or to open up different ways to express the chords I'll throw out example of Cohen's Halleleujah.
    The version I'm used to is in open position and has a certain feel.
    Jeff Buckley's cover is capoed at 5th and uses different voicings of the same chords (C is G shape at 5th fret, etc) which opens up a different way to play with the tonic note and the arpeggios. I love them both for their different moods.

    Also to add a classic capoed song - Hotel California at the 7th for the 12 string part.
     
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  13. Rustbucket

    Rustbucket Poster Extraordinaire

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    I mostly use capos for accompanying myself singing. Although my range has improved over the years, I still capo to better suit my voice or change voicing. I like to keep two acoustics handy, one tuned standard and the other tuned down a full step. I sometimes capo the second one up one fret to be a half step below standard.
     
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  14. kookaburra

    kookaburra Tele-Afflicted

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    +1.
     
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  15. AAT65

    AAT65 Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    It’s from the Italian for “head” (of the fretboard = nut) so it’s “kah-po” originally. (If an Italian wanted you to say “kay-po” he’d spell it chepo or something like that.)
    Nowadays of course you can pronounce it how you like... one of the guitarists I play with says “kay-po” (& uses it even more than I do). I know what he means even though I know it’s meant to be “kah-po” so it’s all good.
     
  16. Rustbucket

    Rustbucket Poster Extraordinaire

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    ^^OK-po
     
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  17. kbold

    kbold Tele-Holic Silver Supporter

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    Since I've never tried it this way, my comments may have been premature.
    I'll have to try it to know (when a string replacement is due).
     
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  18. t guitar floyd

    t guitar floyd Tele-Holic

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    Used to use one when I played acoustic guitar. Then arthritis set in and I can't hold onto one of them big bodies. The capo doesn't work for me on my electrics.
     
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  19. BigDaddyLH

    BigDaddyLH Telefied Ad Free Member

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    And capo is actually short for capotasto (head of fingerboard). I wonder if any classical guitar guys use the full name.
     
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  20. 3-Chord-Genius

    3-Chord-Genius Poster Extraordinaire

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    I avoided them for years because I viewed them as a "crutch", and they certainly can be. But I've recently discovered that open chords, with and without a capo, just seem to ring out better with moderate overdrive than bar chords. Of course bar chords are great for heavy rock, but I'm not doing much of that these days. I now have two capos, both with adjustable tension. I tried one of those Keyser type and it choked the living s*** out of my strings and everything went sharp. I think those are made more for acoustic then electric.
     
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