Do you use 12v cordless tools?

Discussion in 'The DIY Tool Shed' started by Bruxist, Nov 8, 2019 at 10:46 AM.

  1. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Silver Supporter

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    I used to use a cordless craftsman drill/driver. I replaced the batteries once. The last time I went to a Dewalt drill/driver which holds the charge a lot longer than the Sears did.
     
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  2. Alamo

    Alamo Doctor of Teleocity

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    I have the brushless 12v Bosch Flexi Click. I love this tool.

    this is the earlier version. mine has a belt clip, is brushless, has more torque and runs faster RPM and two 3 Ah batteries. so everthing the the guy is missing in his review.
     
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  3. schmee

    schmee Poster Extraordinaire

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    I kinda like the 12v for some things. 18V is too much power sometimes. Especially with guitar work 9V was great. !
     
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  4. Chunkocaster

    Chunkocaster Poster Extraordinaire

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    The newer 18v Makita stuff is pretty good. Pick a brand and stick with it so you can save on batteries and purchase the tools you want without batteries. I use a 9inch 18v cordless grinder to cut bricks with and it works great although you don't get a lot of cuts out of it before the battery dies. Charge time is pretty fast and ive been using one battery with that unit for the past 2 years with no problems. Its filthy and covered in dust but keeps on keeping on so for normal use their stuff should give no problems.

    The last 12v cordless drill I had was next to useless when installing a new fence on thin steel rail, had to charge the battery after every 2 fence sheets.
     
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  5. telemnemonics

    telemnemonics Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    I've worked alongside a guy who had one of the early 18v DeWalt drills seen on virtually every const site when 18v was the new thing.
    I had an 18v Makita that was literally half the size and weight but drove 3" screws more than twice as fast, probably three times as fast.
    And since then I got the next gen brushless that's a good deal more powerful with the same 18v battery.
    It's interesting how far the Ryobi price is from the "pro" level cordless tools, while doing pretty close to the same job.
    How long the tool lasts may be of little consequence if the tech advances.
    My newest Makita is a replacement for my superseded drill that got hit by a wave while I was trying to secure 30 some odd feet of seawall fence in a storm. Convinced management to replace drill and battery since it was cheaper than the fence I did manage to save.
    Washed out the drill and battery but they were dead. Months later I tried them before tossing them and they worked fine!
    I actually like the older less powerful drill a little better for the more sensitive trigger and less wrist wrenching full power level.
    But the newer one has some sort of battery monitoring that cuts power when heat builds up or something like that.

    So many choices and not a lot of then actually suck!
     
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  6. dougstrum

    dougstrum Tele-Holic

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    Had to get a couple of new screw guns, and got 20v. The new ones don't weigh any more, are more powerful and battery charge lasts longer.
     
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  7. Nightclub Dwight

    Nightclub Dwight Tele-Afflicted

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    I normally use Milwaukee Fuel 18 volt tools. But today I was in a customer's home and needed a drill. She just got a new 12 volt Dewalt drill so I grabbed that. It almost felt like a toy it was so light (but solid and well made) and it still did everything I needed. I wouldn't mind picking up a 12 volt for use around the house when you don't need to break out the big guns.

    The big box stores often have holiday deals where you can get a free tool with the purchase of another one, so I'll have to keep my eyes out and see what Milwaukee offers this year.
     
  8. old wrench

    old wrench Tele-Holic

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    Makita still makes nice drill/drivers and impacts in a small and compact 12 volt format.

    In fact, the nicest drill/driver of any voltage I ever used was a 12 volt Makita. It was compact and light and really well balanced. It was their top of the line 12 volt model. Really nice.

    When I replaced my mix of old worn out 12 and 18 volt stuff, I ended up going with 18 volt Makita, mainly because of the deal where I ended up getting 2 of the latest technology 5 amp hour batteries for "free". It would have cost me more $$ to go with that nice little 12 volt model.

    I've always favored the Makita brand for cordless, probably because they were more or less the originators of affordable decent quality cordless tools. They have also done a pretty good job of setting the standard for the rest of the industry too.

    The brush-less motors are a nice improvement; more efficient and they run cooler and will last longer than their brushed counterparts.

    I think the best improvement has been in the battery technology. Between the more efficient motors and the new technology batteries, the newer cordless have nearly the power of corded tools and the batteries just keep on putting out the juice.

    I worked in the trades for quite awhile before battery tools made the scene. Back then a cordless saw was regular old handsaw and a cordless drill/driver was a Yankee screwdriver.

    I can recall lot's of conversations when we would speculate about "new inventions" that would un-tether us from that dang power cord :).


    g
     
  9. stormsedge

    stormsedge TDPRI Member

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    I have one cordless screwdriver that uses batteries...everything else is old school. I still have some of my dad's tools and the socket set he gave me when I was 13. Let all my air wrenches go when I finished college and quit trying to make a living as a mechanic. Still do my own work.
     
  10. RodeoTex

    RodeoTex Poster Extraordinaire

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    I've standardized on the Ridgid 18v family. I've got 10 or 11 of those tools and 4 fairly new batteries.
    I use them most everyday at work and at home. They're really tough and the best batteries last so long sometimes i forget they have to be charged.
    (I never screw in guitar screws with them though)
     
  11. Mark the Moose

    Mark the Moose Tele-Meister

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    Ryobi 18v have served me well.
     
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  12. telepraise

    telepraise Tele-Holic

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    I bought a Makita 18 volt pair (drill and impact driver, the small size) almost 8 years ago and only recently had to replace the batteries. I have done a lot of cabinet work and 80% of the time I reach for a cordless, it's to drill a small hole or drive screws. For that the small Makita is perfect. The adjustable clutch makes it a piece of cake to not overdrive a screw.
     
  13. raito

    raito Poster Extraordinaire

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    I asked for one a couple years ago for my birthday. Mostly for putting in rack screws. Now I use it more than the corded drills. Gonna use it today to finish moving the new front door forward an eighth. Dowel and drill.
     
  14. kafka

    kafka Tele-Afflicted

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    I never got really deep into any system. Just an LED wand light and a couple of driver drills - a Makita 14.4v and a DeWalt 20v.
     
  15. Jim_in_PA

    Jim_in_PA Tele-Meister Ad Free Member

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    I have several drill/drivers. The smallest and lightest gets used the most because it's less tiring. As long as it's suited to the job, that's the one that goes in my hand. In my case with the particular brand, it's actually a 10v with a "C" type handle which is very nicely balanced for detail work. My oldest D/D is a 12v and it's still a workhorse despite being about 13 years old...replaced the batteries twice over that time period. I also have a 15v that gets heavier jobs. For what I do, I never felt the need for the larger and heavier 18-20v setups so I never "upgraded".
     
  16. FenderLover

    FenderLover Friend of Leo's

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    I've got 18V DeWalt, two drills and a light. Going on 20 years probably. 5 batteries total, and one won't charge now. For my use, the battery drills are the only thing I'd go cordless with. I'd never use any power tool on a guitar. What's the hurry?

    Yard work, I have a 12V B&D hedge trimmer that works out pretty well, but takes forever to charge. The rest are 2-cycle.
     
  17. kodiakblair

    kodiakblair TDPRI Member

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    I'm a carpenter and I'm all cordless,even my chop saw. Went with dewalt 18V years back due to weight + torque.

    Couldn't get my impact driver into a tight spot and a fella lent me his 10.V Makita impact gun. Wonderful wee thing. Plenty power and light weight.
    Ordered the drill/driver and impact set that afternoon.5 years later and it's always in my tool kit with the rest.
     
  18. Obsessed

    Obsessed Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I'm going on 22 years with a 12V Makita hand drill. I do replace the batteries about every 8 years. We live off the grid and I have the the house and cabin wired for 120 VAC and 12 VDC, so I can charge the batteries from the 12VDC using a Makita vehicle charger. Sheetrock screws, roofing screws and the occasional small hole to drill, but otherwise not worth it. This saves me from running the 120 VAC inverter. I don't have the electricity to charge up the 18 V stuff, but I did use a Dewalt Ion battery 18v with a built in light that was awesome while helping my dad on his house. My SIL has all sorts of battery operated tools and they are all worthless IMO. My 120VAC hand drill should last me a lifetime and way more powerful.

    Of course, I use my manually cranked hand drill as often as possible.:cool:

    One thing I will add is that battery operated tools are very bad for the environment, so in the long run I think they are a bad investment in many ways.
     
  19. Axis29

    Axis29 Poster Extraordinaire Ad Free Member

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    I do it for a living. Have been, on and off, for about 35 years. I have a pile of current battery operated tools, and a pile and a half of stuff I've sold or broken over the years.

    My current collection spans 12-60 volt tools and batteries, three different manufacturers, and four different chargers. My all day/every day tools are 18V Ridgids. But, I have 12V tools from Ridgid and Bosch. and 20 and 60 volt tools from Dewalt.

    Each tool has it's place. The small 12V stuff is great for gentle things (The Bosch has a nice clutch system to keep me from destroying things) or tight spots where my bigger tools don't fit. The 60 volt tool is a circular saw and it powers through all kinds of stuff.

    I do suffer when it is time to get rid of the batteries. Luckily, I have been able to use them for years, and only had a couple go bad during that time... But, the reality is, I do so many things where a cord just doesn't work.
     
  20. kodiakblair

    kodiakblair TDPRI Member

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    Over here the big sites are starting to frown on corded tools,been on a couple where they're banned outright.
    Pretty soon all the main contractors will power is lighting.
     
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