Do you still use books?

Discussion in 'Tab, Tips, Theory and Technique' started by matrix, Jun 7, 2019.

  1. matrix

    matrix Tele-Meister

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    All of the recent threads on books has got me wondering. Are music books a part of your regular learning regime?

    In the 90s I bought tons of music books (well, pounds anyway). Books with standard notation, tab, books with CDs. Some helped. Most (to be honest) didn't, but that didn't stop the search. I was always hoping something would help me unlock the next level.

    Fast forward to now...virtually all of my learning comes from videos. YouTube, Truefire. Despite having less time to practice, I am advancing faster than I ever did back then, and I have not bought an instructional book in ages.

    Am I missing out? Do you still regularly work with books? Are there favourites that made a big impact on how you play or how you understand music? Recent publications that you think are game changers? Old faves that you still go back to?
     
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  2. TokyoPortrait

    TokyoPortrait Tele-Holic

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    Hi.

    Yes, in the broader sense. While I use my Kindle a lot, I also read physical books.

    In the non music realm, I currently have two physical books on the go and about three on the back burner. And three in the Kindle.

    Similar on the music front. I use YouTube / online resources, but also books. I have PDF books and also physical books. Currently using one physical book for guitar and two for song theory / song writing.

    I like reading.

    Pax/
    Dean
     
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  3. marcflores

    marcflores Tele-Meister

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    I use a mix of both, although as much as I prefer books, sometimes getting stuff online is a lot faster. With books, I feel like I can take my time and really absorb stuff.
     
    Last edited: Jun 7, 2019
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  4. TokyoPortrait

    TokyoPortrait Tele-Holic

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    Hi.

    Realised later that the OP also mentioned what titles. Not sure if any of these qualify as "...favourites that made a big impact...game changers...Old faves that you still go back to...," but here the current music ones.

    Writing Better Lyrics - Pat Pattison
    http://tinyurl.com/y4h6fb4g

    Songwriting: Essential Guide to Rhyming - Pat Pattison
    http://tinyurl.com/y3tbznnu

    Chords and Progressions for Jazz and Popular Guitar - Arnie Berle
    http://tinyurl.com/y2vjh5r4

    Essential Secrets of Songwriting (10 book bundle in PDF) - Gary Ewer
    https://www.secretsofsongwriting.com/prepurchase2.html

    Pax/
    Dean
     
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  5. maxvintage

    maxvintage Friend of Leo's

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    Books are still a major part of what i do all day. Too many books, out of space for books.

    I don't find music books very helpful though. Aside from books with tunes, I've almost always method books extremely irritating. There was just a thread about the Micky Baker jazz book, which I hate. I remember the first time I encountered it I thought it was really dumb that he was calling a chord that had a G in the root a D13b5b9. Like why, on page one, are you doing that? I actually think it's just that I'm a poor student of music. but Ive always found music method books really drstrating.

    one exception for jazz stuff is the two Barry Galbraith books. H doesn't try to explain much, but all his arrangements make total sense on the guitar and they aren't hard for the most part. They're beautiful, and part of what's beautiful about them is their straightforward elegance
     
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  6. Junkyard Dog

    Junkyard Dog Tele-Afflicted

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    Sounds like we got into it around the same time. I bought tons of books in 90s also. I have kept them all, and I'd estimate I have well over 100. The ONE book that really propelled me forward I lost, or loaned, or something, and I don't have it. It was "Bluegrass Guitar" by Happy Traum. It came with one of those tear-out records that you had to lay a penny on to get the needle to track. After a few days with that, I realized holy smokes I can actually play guitar...songs, breaks, runs, everything!

    And then VHS tapes, DVDs, and now digital downloads. I like the Truefire material also...very well done.

    I intend to take inventory of it all at some point...if for no other reason than my own curiosity of what all I have amassed.

    Oh, but to your question, no, I don't use the books much at all anymore...almost never. I refer to them once and again for nostalgia. Shoot, I might go on ebay right now and find a used copy of that Happy Traum book.
     
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  7. NothingGoatboat

    NothingGoatboat Tele-Meister

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    Yeah. I hate reading on the web, especially books. It gives you a headache after a while of staring at the tiny screen. And staring at your phone before bed isn't good for you at all, if you like reading at night.
     
  8. gitarjoe

    gitarjoe Tele-Afflicted

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    masters.jpg Books? oh yea still use them
     
  9. TokyoPortrait

    TokyoPortrait Tele-Holic

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    Hi.

    Speaking of TrueFire, I just added The Bass Groove Survival Guide to my collection, after swearing I would not buy any more. My children want to record something bass line heavy and I was at a loss...
     
  10. 24 track

    24 track Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

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    most definately yes, a few music books , on anthology of different songs, books on theory, scales , chord encylopedias , rhyming dictionaries, I would find some at yard sales, swap meets, and a few how to books , or midi theory and of course the most important the yearly vintage guitar price guides and lastly books and magazines on a specific piece of gear and how to use it
     
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  11. Old Deaf Roadie

    Old Deaf Roadie Tele-Holic

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    I still use books, except I call them the internet now.
     
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  12. trev333

    trev333 Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Just last week I used a good old fashioned paper street directory to find a path to a friends place in an area I kinda knew, but there had been a lot more development since then and a highway bypass...;)

    I had to really dig around at home to find it... I knew it was here somewhere..:rolleyes::D
     
  13. ASATKat

    ASATKat Tele-Afflicted

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    Collecting books with real purpose started in '82 for me. It started with me discovering REH, a publisher connected to GIT. My first purchase was The Power Of 10, an incredible work with 10 private lessons from 10 greats. Robert's, Ford, Graydon, Carlton, Pass, Mock, Eschette, Van Halen, Tedesco, Wise. I still have it and love it, now in two pieces lol.

    REH published a whole series of artist Hot Licks "skinny" books that were groundbreaking in the way they presented the books with >minimal verbiage<, the coolest cutting edge modern lines, and great tab with rhythms attached making the tab readable like notation, this format became widely popular in later guitar books from other publushers.

    My favorite REH "skinny books" are Steve Friedman Jazz/Rock, Robben Ford Blues, and one of the best books ever on his approach, period, Pat Martino's Linear Expressions.

    As a producer of guitar books, REH lit a fire under me like no other guitar books.

    REH were not the only great books I've discovered, just the first.
     
    Last edited: Jun 9, 2019
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  14. Chunkocaster

    Chunkocaster Poster Extraordinaire

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    I like to place a few on the coffee table when i'm entertaining a lady, the leather bound ones work best.
     
  15. ASATKat

    ASATKat Tele-Afflicted

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    As far as books that actually taught me vital theory I put a shout out to Frank Gambale's Techniques books 1 & 2. Book 1 is simply the best, clearest and most usable outline on how to use scales, pents, arps, triads, and two notes as they apply to the five applicable chords. Minor 7 Doian & Aeolian,,
    Major 7 Ionian & Lydian,, Unaltered Dominant 7 & Lydian b7,, Minor7b5,, and Diminished.

    That's a lot of info, Gambale gives you the broad overview choices, and then he gives you his favorite choices which is his 1 choice over all the others, bringing it down to simplicity on earth.

    And Frank presents it with minimal verbiage like the REH books. 83 pg.

    1+
     
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  16. ASATKat

    ASATKat Tele-Afflicted

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    My women prefer the dog eared books the most.
     
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  17. ndcaster

    ndcaster Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    I'm with you, Max

    one guy I'm learning a ton from these days though it is taking a while to absorb fully is Bill Graham, who does these fantastic videos on YT about Barry Harris's approach

    then I take out blank fretboard paper and map the stuff out on guitar, and then apply to tunes

    I changed jobs recently, so I'm looking forward to an hour every Tuesday evening hanging at a jazz jam

    oh, and non-music books? all. the. time.
     
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  18. fretflip

    fretflip TDPRI Member

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    I used a couple of guitar books from Hal Leonard back in the days, then I created https://www.fretflip.com for scale and chord reference, and to use as my personal commonplace for learning and teaching guitar. Still read other books though, related to music some biographies by Ozzy, Nile Rodgers and Slash to name a few.
     
  19. thebowl

    thebowl Tele-Meister

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    I still have tab pages ripped from Acoustic Guitar and Guitar Player from the early 90s through the 00s, along with some books from that era.
     
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