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Do You Practice With A Metronome

Discussion in 'The BASS Place' started by robert spencer, Jul 28, 2013.

  1. robert spencer

    robert spencer Tele-Holic

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    Is it neccessary to use them when practicing alone? Do they actually assist in developing a sense of time? Do some have an earphone option to be heard above the bass output? Anything else that you wish to contribute is appreciated.
    Thanks & take care. Bob
     
  2. soulman969

    soulman969 Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Sometimes but using a drum machine to practice against different feels as well as tempos is more useful.
     
  3. Bongocaster

    Bongocaster Friend of Leo's

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    Wonderful devices, metronomes. You can find out where your sense of time is in the first place, and of course regular practice with one will help instill good timing.

    When you practice some type of exercise or piece you start out slow and then can incrementally increase the speed, which will help you to progress and also keep track of your progress.

    I used one when taking private saxophone lessons as a wee lad. I use a metronome these days to practice rudiments and basic techniques on congas and bongos. I pretty much have perfect timing. On the beat. I have a Tama Rhythm Watch and I'm off when it comes to subdivisions - eighth notes, 16ths and the like. I basically play with "swing." Which is just fine, as I can get things to line up with practice, and most of the types of music that I play has some type of swing in it.

    A nice thing about using a metronome with drums is that you can set the volume so that if you are on time the sound of the metronome disappears. Don't think that you could do that with guitar.

    Get one with some type of visual indicator. Most of them will have that.
     
  4. Robus

    Robus TDPRI Member

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    I'll often set up a drum loop.
     
  5. adjason

    adjason Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    I have found the best thing to do to develop a sense of time is to sing the song while you play it.
     
  6. sax4blues

    sax4blues Friend of Leo's

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    I almost always use a metronome or drum machine. I do believe the metronome will help develop consistent time.
     
  7. bargeon

    bargeon TDPRI Member

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    I used to. But something odd happened. The 'nome kept speeding up :confused:
    :D
     
  8. BBill64

    BBill64 Tele-Afflicted

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    I don't need one!

    [​IMG]
     
  9. adeiderich

    adeiderich Tele-Afflicted

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    I prefer to use a drum loop from a Casio keyboard over a metronome.......... mainly because I can never hear the little "pop" on the metronome.
     
  10. burtonfan

    burtonfan Tele-Afflicted

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    I ABSOLUTELY use a metronome when I practice! I prefer a metronome to a drum machine/loop because the metronome is devoid of any groove. Often, a machine/loop will inject a bit of 'groove' to the beat, which may or may not be appropriate for the genre one is practicing.

    The drummer in our band also uses a metronome to set his internal tempo before EVERY song. He has our song list with tempo markings beside each number. As we're talking with the audience between songs, he'll reference his metronome quickly (he just watches the light pulse, then turns it off). The result is amazing! The proper tempo can make or break a song, or a band for that matter.

    The metronome doesn't work in all cases, and a band must be flexible enough to forego it when appropriate. Overall, it's a big plus to the groove and style of any given song. IMHO, tempo is the single most overlooked aspect of performing. Experiment with it in your own band, you may be surprised!

    G'luk! :cool::cool:
     
  11. Bernie

    Bernie Tele-Afflicted

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    No bass, but fwiw,



     
    Last edited: Jul 30, 2013
  12. Cadfael

    Cadfael Tele-Meister

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    Hi Bob,

    that's why I have - and love - my Roland MicroBass RX ...
    It has a "Rhythm Guide" built in. No brilliant drum sounds but very easy to use - and built in. Tap the tempo, choose a rhythm and drum pattern. Easy and uncomplicated can never be too expensive - it's luxury ...

    And to practice a jazz song with an (even easy) drum pattern makes much more fun than with a metronome. In contrast to playing along with a song on CD, you can hear your timing mistakes with the pure drum pattern.
     
  13. dlb1001

    dlb1001 Tele-Meister

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    I haven't used mine, for awhile. Drum loops are little better for general practice.
    Anthony Wellington (instructor at Victor Wooten's Bass Camp) had a great exercise for improving time. He wrote a single measure and subdivided the 4 beats into 8's then turn on the loop then had the students try to hit the beat that he had marked on the dryboard. Then, Anthony further subdivided the beats into 16's then had the students repeat the exercise...very tough!
    I think the Youtube video may still be up.
     
  14. slippin slider

    slippin slider Tele-Afflicted

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    I always have a beat going. Drum machines boss and alesis .with the alesis l can advance or ****** the snare 4 or 5 midi units to create a different feel than straight up and down.
    It has helped me just don't give me any gum to chew.
     
  15. slippin slider

    slippin slider Tele-Afflicted

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    Ouchb! Lol and so true. ;)
     
  16. Chris S.

    Chris S. Asst. Admin

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    I've been using metronomes for nearly 5 decades. I believe in them firmly.

    Once technique that's especially useful for bass is to set the metronome at half your tempo, then count "One" and "Three" between the beats to turn the time around, with the metronome clicks happening on 2 and 4. You're forced to supply the 1, so you'll know right away if you're speeding up or slowing down. And once you lock in, you can actually get a kinda/sorta groove going with the metronome. ;-) Best of luck, CS
     
  17. HOBBSTER01

    HOBBSTER01 Friend of Leo's

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    drum loop
     
  18. Bongocaster

    Bongocaster Friend of Leo's

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    Another fun thing to do is to see how slow you can go. You might be surprised at how difficult it is when those quiet spaces get longer. I do it sometimes but I'm not so sure what practical purpose it serves as I can't think of any songs that go down to 40 BPM.
     
  19. Ricardo Moraes

    Ricardo Moraes Tele-Meister

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    I use a metronome for my drum practice. Unfortunately, I don't have the patiance to use one for my guitar practice.
     
  20. Kitty

    Kitty Tele-Meister

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    I do occasionally to double check my self but after years and years of band and chorus back when I was in school I really don't need it.

    My band director was a screamer and if you mucked something up, you learned fast not to do it again. :eek:

    I've had my husband help me check my timing against one and I'm accurate lol
     
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