Do You KNOW The Fretboard?

Discussion in 'Tab, Tips, Theory and Technique' started by Texicaster, Oct 6, 2019.

  1. ASATKat

    ASATKat Tele-Afflicted

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    You want to not only know the fretboard but OWN the fretboard??

    Get involved with the weekly backing track jam where you post you playing to a backing track and then post it Twanger Central sub forum here. The people are way cool, the regulars don't tell others how to play, they see the cup as half full. And if you asked for constructive critique and no negative criticism you would get just that.

    And learning the neck? No better way to learn it than by making music with it.

    A year of doing this fun weekly bt will forever improve your musical thinking and your playing.
     
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  2. ASATKat

    ASATKat Tele-Afflicted

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    You want to not only know the fretboard but OWN the fretboard??

    Get involved with the weekly backing track jam where you post you playing to a backing track and then posting it. The people are cool, the regulars don't tell others how to play, they see the cup as half full. And if you asked for constructive critique and no negative criticism you would get just that.

    And learning the neck? No better way to learn it than by making music with it.

    A year of doing this fun weekly bt will forever improve your musical thinking and your playing.
     
  3. codamedia

    codamedia Friend of Leo's

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    Yes.... every note, every position, every string, immediate recall.

    The importance was instilled in me at a seminar with the great Tommy Tedesco back in the late 70's. One recurring theme was that it's not enough to play by pattern, you need to know what you are actually playing.

    I really like @Larry F 's description on page one. The notes are like family members names, you don't really give it any thought... but you can recall the name whenever you need to.
     
    Last edited: Oct 9, 2019
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  4. blueruins

    blueruins TDPRI Member

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    Did anyone address the question about why you would call an F an E#?

    If not; one reason is that when you are spelling chord names the notes retain their names.

    In this example if you were to augment an A Major chord (which is A,C#,E) you would raise the 5th a half step to E#. This way you do not conflate the function of the 6th note in the scale the F#.
     
  5. dswo

    dswo Tele-Meister

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    My father taught me what he knew in my teens. I came back to guitar in my forties, and started weekly lessons three years ago. My initial goal was to be able to play melodically. I've made some progress, but what freedom I've gained is mostly within a single octave. I can link octaves up, but large leaps are still leaps in the dark. I'm now at the point where I want to know all the notes. Also, I think it would help with chord analysis. Given time, I can calculate the right answer, but calculating is not seeing; and only seeing is fast enough.
     
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  6. klasaine

    klasaine Poster Extraordinaire

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    Same concept works with scales and extrapolates to actual music 'reading'.

    F#major, which is not an uncommon key contains: F# G# A# B C# D# E# F#

    F#majorscale.png

    You don't want to notate or write F to F#. It's hard to read and throws off the symmetry of the line. Each note of the scale has to be a consecutive letter of the (musical) alphabet.

    And in reference to the op ... Yes, I absolutely know the fretboard. Cold.
     
    Last edited: Oct 9, 2019
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  7. ASATKat

    ASATKat Tele-Afflicted

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    E# is the 7th degree of the F# key.

    But you would need to give me a good reason why the tune needs 6 sharps. One 1/2 step up or down takes us to a pleasent G or a sultry F.
     
  8. klasaine

    klasaine Poster Extraordinaire

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    Besides the fact that some singers like it there, F# major is a really cool key on the guitar. The open string against fretted note possibilities make for some very interesting options and 'opportunities'. A# against B to start.
    C# is another great key. Don't take my word for it. Beethoven and Mozart liked it too.
     
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  9. TelecasterSam

    TelecasterSam Tele-Holic

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    It's a gradual thing, learning all the notes. If you learn all the major chords, open and barre chords all up and down the neck, you'll learn what the root note is and the octaves in that position. Before long it becomes automatic. Play the chord and you'll know the notes in the chord. Then you can be playing a lead and when searching for a note, it's probably going to be one in the chord you're in. I had a guy test me. He named a fret and string, I'd go to it and tell him what note it was in about a second. It will come to you as you learn chords and think about them, analyze them, etc. It's stuck with me for 40 years....so far!
     
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  10. bcorig

    bcorig Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    Why yes, the fretboard just buzzed me a few minutes ago.
     
  11. ASATKat

    ASATKat Tele-Afflicted

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    Ok,
     
  12. schmee

    schmee Poster Extraordinaire

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    After decades of playing I read one thing years ago that made more sense than any theory, scales, or knowing where a note was. It was a quote from Stevie Ray during an interview that went something like: "you get a note and feeling in your head, at a certain point as a musician, your fingers know where that note is and how to get that feeling. Once you reach that point, you can be the musician you want to be"

    It's taken me decades, but I am closer to that point now than I have ever been. Still, it takes a lot of discipline to follow my head and tell a story, instead of thinking about scales, licks and notes on the fretboard.... easy to fall back to that.
     
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  13. ASATKat

    ASATKat Tele-Afflicted

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    Good story.
    I can always tell a story, my trouble is providing the technique to pull it off. But like you, time is making me better and I'm seeing me teetering on some really great stuff and falling freely into "the other side". My biggest obsticle is my internal doubt that I hear this stuff so well I can freely play.

    Here is an example of me with less doubt about neck freedom and "finally" playing some purposeful melody with the chords. Recorded last week in the Twanger's backing track challenge. No charts or prep other than key, the rest is just my ear for what I thought it was and how well I knew the fretboard.

    Every Time We Say Goodbye


    It's taken me years to get this far, and where I'm at right now I would call the ground level prerequisite for diving into the good stuff. I think the best is yet to come.
     
    Last edited: Oct 15, 2019
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