Do you have an accent?

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by Lost_N_Austin, May 25, 2010.

  1. dburns

    dburns Friend of Leo's

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    I can pick out the subtleties of a Philly/South Jersey accent in a heartbeat and be accurate 80-90% of the time. It's hard to describe, not as easy identifiable as New York/North Jersey or a Boston accent. And it's not any accent that's in the movies or anything and not everybody has it. I can't put my finger on how to describe it, but I just know it when I hear it.
     
  2. Chrismo

    Chrismo Friend of Leo's

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    Apparently so, though no one can ever figure out where it came from. I've lived here all my life and Virginia Beach doesn't really have any sort of an accent (we're a military area with a ton of different accents). When people hear me talk, they think I'm from North Carolina, Tennessee, or in the western part of Virginia. They're stunned when I tell them I've been here all of my life.

    I'm pretty sure I picked it up from my grandmom though - if anyone has an accent, it is her.
     
  3. Broken Light

    Broken Light Tele-Meister

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    I guess I have standard American accent, for the most part, eastside Cleveland. Almost makes me wish I had a soundclip to post.
     
  4. tgfmike

    tgfmike Telefied Ad Free Member

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    If American television is the standard for 'no accent', then I have little or no accent. I am often very impressed with Australian and English actors who do 'American' for US TV.

    Just after the 2000 US elections, there was a flyer on the internet where the UK was offering to take the US back into the empire, since we were displaying signs of being unable to govern ourselves. We had to meet 10 criteria to be allowed back in. Number 1 was to be able to distinguish between English and Australian accents.
     
  5. Mid Life Crisis

    Mid Life Crisis Poster Extraordinaire

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    I was born in the south east of England then moved to the north of Scotland at age 7, then down to Yorkshire in the north of England at 13, to Nottigham in the midlands at 31 then to East Anglia at 35. Consequently I have no strong accent; if anything it sounds slightly "southern", but with the odd northern-sounding word thrown in at times.
     
  6. imsilly

    imsilly Friend of Leo's

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    That woman should stop watching the Fast Show!



    More Accents!

     
  7. Joel Terry

    Joel Terry Poster Extraordinaire

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    All of my paternal and maternal kin are at least eight-generation Middle Tennesseans, and I've lived in and around Nashville for 41 of my 42 years. (I just happened to be born in Orlando, Florida, and lived there for my first year--but, hey, at least I was conceived in Tennessee!) When I travel around, however, I'm invariably asked, "So, which part of Texas are you from?" (Oddly enough, I've been told by several people that my speaking voice sounds identical to Stevie Ray Vaughan's normal speaking voice.)

    Years ago, whenever I traveled abroad on business, I used to try to speak with a non-regional, Midwestern U.S. accent; unfortunately, cornbread crumbs kept falling out of my mouth and giving me away. So I just gave up.

    So am I--Hugh Laurie on House, M.D. is a great example of a seamless American accent by a British actor. Bob Hoskins, Anthony Hopkins, Nicole Kidman, and Rachel Griffiths also immediately come to mind as British or Australian actors/actresses who can speak with flawless American accents.

    Conversely, 99.9% of English-speaking actors and actresses not native to the Southeastern U.S. can't pull off a passable U.S. Southern accent to save their lives. At least not to my ears; frankly, their attempts are grating. Believe it or not, I think it's because they tend to over-exaggerate it to the point it sounds like a bad caricature. (No doubt, that's because a Southeastern U.S. accent probably sounds inherently exaggerated and cartoonish to most non-Southerners!) One of few actors who could mimic a Southern U.S. accent and do it flawlessly was Peter Sellers; then again, Peter Sellers was so gifted, he could mimic most any accent flawlessly. ;)

    Joel
     
    Last edited: May 25, 2010
  8. bo

    bo Poster Extraordinaire

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    Naw, I don't. It seems most everyone else around where I live does though.
     
  9. smsuryan

    smsuryan Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    everyone has an accent depending where you are from...
     
  10. Joel Terry

    Joel Terry Poster Extraordinaire

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    To me, British accents and Australian accents are so discernibly disparate that confusing the two would be akin to confusing Errol Flynn with Elmer Fudd.

    Joel
     
  11. Dave Hopping

    Dave Hopping Friend of Leo's

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    The most definitive General American spoken today can be heard in Southern Ontario.Sometimes there's the faintest hint of a Scottish overlay.

    Once I saw an English TV series(all the actors were Brits) about US-born RAF pilots during the Battle of Britain.The way the Brits do a US accent was just fascinating!

    Not long ago I ran across an NHK(Japan's main TV network)English-language newscast on cable.The woman doing the newscast was very fluent in General American,but made a particular point of over-enunciating her R's and L's.Had the feeling she was showing off just a bit.
     
  12. tgfmike

    tgfmike Telefied Ad Free Member

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    If I hadn't just changed my sig to use tutm's "spin in circles and whoop" line, I would have snagged this one. "discernably disparate" - awesome. And then the two EF names. Masterful.
     
  13. telefreak

    telefreak Tele-Holic

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    Kind of non descript estuary english.
    Think Daniel Craig, that's estuary english.
    No real accent as such, just well pronounced english, but not so posh that we don't use abbreviations or use the word Yeah a lot.

    I'd say that my accent is estuary english, ocaisionally slipping into an Essex accent depending on who I'm with
     
  14. bradpdx

    bradpdx Friend of Leo's

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    I moved from coast to coast several times as a kid, and cultivated an "American Newscaster" accent if such a thing exists. I talk like TV - the great American equalizer.

    My wife is from Minnesota. Boy, is she from Minnesota. Ya sure you betcha!
     
  15. Guitarzan

    Guitarzan Poster Extraordinaire

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    I think about that every time I go in that courtroom (Trisha Yearwood's hometown in Monticello, GA).

    Are you a yankee in Okieland?
     
  16. e-merlin

    e-merlin Doctor of Teleocity

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    Everyone has an accent. We just don't realize it until we go somewhere everyone else points it out.
     
  17. Guitarzan

    Guitarzan Poster Extraordinaire

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    :lol::lol::lol:

    I love it.
     
  18. fakeocaster

    fakeocaster Tele-Afflicted Ad Free Member

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    My accent is a mixture of Dublin(where I grew up) and Wexford(where Ive spent most of my adult life).To be more accurate I sound like an outsider in both places.

    Probably because Ireland is such a small country there is a notable differance to Irish ears between the two places.The rest of the world seems to hear all Irish accents as the same however so that it probably doesnt matter in this context
     
  19. Guitarzan

    Guitarzan Poster Extraordinaire

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    It reminds me of the joke about the handsome guy from down around Mobile. He went into a yankee restaurant and told the waitress that it sure would be nice to get a piece of ice.

    Later on he said that was sure nice of her, but he'd still like to get some ice so he could finish his drink.
     
  20. Stevie 202

    Stevie 202 Tele-Afflicted

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    I'm sure I must have, but I'm not really aware of it nor would I be able to describe it.
    A little bit of the 'valley' I guess.
     
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