Do you have a bug out bag? Emergency food supply?

Skydog1010

Friend of Leo's
Gold Supporter
Joined
Apr 20, 2019
Posts
3,051
Age
69
Location
Old Dominion
Where does diesel ever actually go "short?' Sure, the commodities market will try to convince you that there is a shortage, but that is usually a phony shortage created for the benefit of traders. Has there ever actually been a situation where there wasn't plenty of diesel fuel in the country? Not that I can recall. Yes, there are temporary situations related to delivery issues, as we sometimes experience in Florida when there is a hurricane. In my 55 years of driving I have never been in a situation where fuel was not available beyond the range of a full tank. If you fear a shortage, don't let your tank get too low. If your driving is generally close to home, you're not likely to have a problem.
I'm not talking "short' as in commodities short. Reserves get hit hard in the seasons of spring and fall, especially in the eastern US. Now that Naval activity had picked up there's some depletion from that but most boats refuel at ports of call around the globe.

Media is stirring the stick as hard as they can, a small war going on, economy slipping, people refusing to work, nasty viruses making people sick, some REAL food shortages, lots of natural calamity with weather affecting food production, War affecting good distribution and next year production of grains - easy to go into panic mode.

Now if stuff hits the fan and you are not prepared I'll give you a peanut butter sandwich, if I like you or know you I might even put jelly on it and a glass of purified water, but try to take my stuff because I worked for it, saved up and put up and stored up - the outcome will be very different, I shudder to even think about it.

90% mental, 10% physical and 10% things/stuff/food and medicine.

Having a kit in the car to get home I think is something everyone should do - everyone, mom, dad, children. And you need to know how to use your kit, every item. Every item should be able to be used for multiple uses, everyone should be trained in first aid and medical procedures that each person can buckup, learnup, and physically perform.

Self reliance and no FEAR, is essential.

Physical fitness should be emphasized, and basic (or advanced) hand to hand combat skills for the purpose of protection need to be learned. My Dad served in Korea in the USAF and he said the most terrifying thing he had to deal with on the ground were the hungry kids that would attack for food in gangs.

My final two cents.
 

Skydog1010

Friend of Leo's
Gold Supporter
Joined
Apr 20, 2019
Posts
3,051
Age
69
Location
Old Dominion
I'm no fan of the Washington Post, but even they are raising a red flag. This excerpt from Nov.10, 2022:

Inventories of diesel in the United States are the lowest they have been heading into winter in 70 years, unnerving a broad spectrum of consumers and businesses. The shortage leaves soybean farmers in the Midwest struggling to stay out of the red and lawmakers in New England imploring the administration to release fuel from the nation’s emergency home heating oil reserves.

In the southeast, a major national supplier of diesel, Mansfield Energy, recently declared a “Code Red,” warning that some terminals were running out of fuel, forcing supply trucks to divert elsewhere. Industrial customers were advised to give three days notice before making new orders. Home heating oil suppliers are confronting similar challenges in New Englan
d.
Major refiner was down for longer than expected upgrade, had a major impact, it just came back online yesterday.

We don't have boo-kuoo refineries. Have lots of pump jacks and 52+ nukes but limited refinery count.

Supply and demand. I just bought a used car 2021, very very very low mileage but I paid like 12% less than original retail and was dang glad to get it for that.
 

bowman

Friend of Leo's
Joined
Sep 15, 2006
Posts
3,660
Location
Massachusetts
What I really need is a generator to power the house in case we lose electricity. All of our water comes from a well, so without electricity for the pump we are not surviving for long in any disaster. I’ll probably do that next year - my brother is an electrician so the installation will only cost me a couple of beers.
I do have a bag in the car that would get me through a day or two if something like a weather emergency happened away from home.
 

kuch

Friend of Leo's
Joined
Sep 30, 2011
Posts
2,224
Location
Great Northwest
I figured you'd have stuff, already.

But...

What if you can't drive? Or the roads are so jammed up that it's not even worth it?
we, wife and I, could probably survive in our house for 6 months if we had access to a couple of things. water and fuel. we have enough water stored for at least 30 days. at the 1st sign of power outage, I always fill up our bathtub. I would need to get to a local stream or lake to get water. I have a pump filter that will work for that. the challenge would be fuel if all of the systems were down. I don't expect to drive much but would need to replenish fuel for generators and cooking.
we also have a 4 wheel drive vehicle if we have to use it.

to answer your question, I do not plan to get on the road immediately after any disaster, but plan to shelter in place. the only reason to travel would be to help family and friends if needed.

good for you for thinking about planning. even in places that are prone to hurricanes and tornadoes, most people don't have supplies to last over 3-5 days.

our biggest threat in the nw is earthquakes and eruptions.
 

PCollen

Friend of Leo's
Joined
May 7, 2010
Posts
4,405
Location
Space Coast, FL
Just curious.

I'm not a prepper, but lately I've been buying more non-perishable foods when I find them on sale and have been half-heartedly putting aside some things that seem to make sense for a "bugout" bag. The problem is that some of the things that would go in there are things I occasionally need, so I don't want them stuffed in a bag with a bunch of other stuff.

I'm not of the doomsday or civil war prepper mentality. I'm more concerned with natural disaster and infrastructure collapse scenarios. A more immediate concern is food items. I can only see prices getting higher and, inevitably, shortages. A couple weeks ago I found a 20lb bag of rice on sale for $7.50 and grabbed it. I never used to do that.

Show of hands: Who has a bugout bag? And feel free to share any suggestions for what should go in one.
Of course. Living on Florida's East coast...its a must. But to date, after 30 years here, I've never had to use it. I suppose I should check the expiration dates on the food items...:lol:
 

kuch

Friend of Leo's
Joined
Sep 30, 2011
Posts
2,224
Location
Great Northwest
What I really need is a generator to power the house in case we lose electricity. All of our water comes from a well, so without electricity for the pump we are not surviving for long in any disaster. I’ll probably do that next year - my brother is an electrician so the installation will only cost me a couple of beers.
I do have a bag in the car that would get me through a day or two if something like a weather emergency happened away from home.
my son and his family have a well on his property. I picked up a generator for him several years ago but it didn't have enough "juice" to run his well pump. I've been on him about upgrading so they can have water when the power goes out. he finally picked up a generator this summer at costco that can power his whole house including the well pump. last week his power was out for 4 days due to a windstorm we had in our area. he had heat and water! and his freezers didn't defrost
it takes a load off my mind
a lot of people don't realize that without power/generator, their food in their fridge and freezers will probably spoil in a week or so.
 

Fiesta Red

Doctor of Teleocity
Joined
Nov 15, 2010
Posts
10,026
Location
Texas
A paramedic/firefighter friend recently suggested putting a couple of bottles of vodka and whiskey in one of the bags; he said, in a pinch you can use the vodka as a wound disinfectant, use either of the liquors as a bartering token or (of course) drink it.

Since I don’t drink, I figured it would be helpful to my wife and daughter in the last category, but useful to me in the previous two.

RE: expiration dates on foodstuffs…how can you tell with sardines? They taste like they’re expired anyway…
 

BryMelvin

Friend of Leo's
Joined
Jan 4, 2014
Posts
2,435
Age
70
Location
Arivaca AZ
47 posts and NO ONE has mentioned a spare pair of cargo shorts… o_O
Youse guys are not really serious about this, are you?
Who needs cargo shorts when my old BDUs are in the closet (and even a pair of my old jungle fatigues from Thailand)?

spelling edits.: I should know not to try and use a phone!
 
Last edited:

Skydog1010

Friend of Leo's
Gold Supporter
Joined
Apr 20, 2019
Posts
3,051
Age
69
Location
Old Dominion
my son and his family have a well on his property. I picked up a generator for him several years ago but it didn't have enough "juice" to run his well pump. I've been on him about upgrading so they can have water when the power goes out. he finally picked up a generator this summer at costco that can power his whole house including the well pump. last week his power was out for 4 days due to a windstorm we had in our area. he had heat and water! and his freezers didn't defrost
it takes a load off my mind
a lot of people don't realize that without power/generator, their food in their fridge and freezers will probably spoil in a week or so.
Should have the ability to can perishable food, especially meats and also containers for dry goods with oxygen absorbers. A vacuum sealer is nice to have too. New England and northern border State''s should have alternate heat sources for their homes.

Anyone east of the Mississippi river should be able to find water easily and be able to treat it for contamination.

I pray that there is never a reason for any of us to go into survival mode.
 

Skydog1010

Friend of Leo's
Gold Supporter
Joined
Apr 20, 2019
Posts
3,051
Age
69
Location
Old Dominion
A paramedic/firefighter friend recently suggested putting a couple of bottles of vodka and whiskey in one of the bags; he said, in a pinch you can use the vodka as a wound disinfectant, use either of the liquors as a bartering token or (of course) drink it.

Since I don’t drink, I figured it would be helpful to my wife and daughter in the last category, but useful to me in the previous two.

RE: expiration dates on foodstuffs…how can you tell with sardines? They taste like they’re expired anyway…
Everclear works perfect, vodka is a good alternative.

Small bottles of sealed alcohol makes for a great barter item.
 

flathd

Poster Extraordinaire
Joined
Jan 29, 2008
Posts
6,536
Age
69
Location
The Icycle Zone , MN
No bug out bag here. just a bowl of leftover Halloween candy. Who would have thought kids don't like Heath bars? Kids these days. One Payday bar left but my niece wants it and she's about 30 years old. Kids these days...
 

TwangerWannabe

Tele-Afflicted
Joined
Jun 25, 2019
Posts
1,094
Location
West Coast
I have a little project I started recently: harvesting the fluff from cattails, mushing it up with Vaseline, then wrapping it in wax paper. It's an excellent fire starter. A blob of the stuff about 1" in diameter ignites readily and will burn impressively for 5 minutes. That's plenty long enough to get a fire going. I haven't yet figured out the right shape for my tinder stuff. I like the idea of it looking like a stogie, though.
Dryer lint and vaseline do the same thing.
 

effzee

Friend of Leo's
Ad Free Member
Joined
Jun 7, 2017
Posts
2,406
Age
59
Location
Germany
Living where we do in Europe and with the world being what it is today, we actually have stocked up on non-perishables and things like a camping stove, battery powered radio (which were were surprised to find out we didn't have already), etc
 

imwjl

Doctor of Teleocity
Joined
Mar 21, 2007
Posts
13,419
Location
My mom's basement.
I still believe that this is an orchestrated shortage that is intended to raise prices and boost profits for energy producers and commodity traders. And there is enough in the emergency reserves to supplement what is available on the market.
What might support those beliefs? I can't believe that for a few reasons. To start is being a news junkie, but also with context being the work I've done, still do, and time. Then add absolutely true and credible news of recent refinery and transportation challenges.

The work context is recent stuff but long ago when I was in fleet management. The days out reserves were not much if any different then vs now. Seasonal, nature related, and other economic issues issues would also be the same. Now our transportation part is small - our fleet - but we are in the food distribution and retail business with a whole lot of business intelligence to help us get $ hundreds of millions of the stuff. That includes lots of energy stuff. It is a big part of how we eat.

The supply data is easy to find. Private data and sources for the most part are a close match with EIA data.

If we have collusion or conspiracy, have I along with whole industries missed some coordinated refinery shut downs? In all this don't forget or for those unaware, that refinery capacity and transportation matters are not same as "oil supply".
 

imwjl

Doctor of Teleocity
Joined
Mar 21, 2007
Posts
13,419
Location
My mom's basement.
I can also suggest don't live in places that are poorly managed. Stuff like planning, management, revenue, education and execution create big differences in how things run and how disasters are handled and solved.

When our area had a natural disaster in 2018, the post-mortem info showed we could have been just like some mostly south, southeast and stretching to TX areas that didn't handle floods, tornadoes and electrical utility problems with the same competence. A call went out in town for everyone to help with the FEMA applications - we were first in the state to get it done. From what we learned we did a 5 year fee attached to sewer/water bills fixing and fortifying problems on our own while I'm sure for next disasters in same areas we'll again be bailing out their lack of sagacity.

We also did the opposite of some stereotypes on energy. The well managed mix of natural gas, a little coal, solar, wind and hydro made our local grid more reliable vs the managed poorly parts of our nation. It has better survived natural and man made issues.

If you don't want to leave a place that's managed poorly, get on your officials to get their act together.
 

Toto'sDad

Tele Axpert
Ad Free Member
Joined
Jun 21, 2011
Posts
60,846
Location
Bakersfield
What might support those beliefs? I can't believe that for a few reasons. To start is being a news junkie, but also with context being the work I've done, still do, and time. Then add absolutely true and credible news of recent refinery and transportation challenges.

The work context is recent stuff but long ago when I was in fleet management. The days out reserves were not much if any different then vs now. Seasonal, nature related, and other economic issues issues would also be the same. Now our transportation part is small - our fleet - but we are in the food distribution and retail business with a whole lot of business intelligence to help us get $ hundreds of millions of the stuff. That includes lots of energy stuff. It is a big part of how we eat.

The supply data is easy to find. Private data and sources for the most part are a close match with EIA data.

If we have collusion or conspiracy, have I along with whole industries missed some coordinated refinery shut downs? In all this don't forget or for those unaware, that refinery capacity and transportation matters are not same as "oil supply".
Though it won't, maybe even can't happen, but not only the U.S. but perhaps the whole world would be better off without cable news, period. Cable news does NOT report the news, they report opinion, and you know what they say about rearends and opinions. Commentators and pundits are often driving forces today in people's lives, but they are like hired guitar slingers, they play for the money. I have been around long enough to see them switch their opinions, sometimes more than once on the same subject. I put ZERO stock in them.
 

BigDaddyLH

Tele Axpert
Ad Free Member
Joined
Sep 1, 2009
Posts
63,965
Location
Kelowna, British Columbia, Canada
but_wait_theres_more_640_18.jpg
 

imwjl

Doctor of Teleocity
Joined
Mar 21, 2007
Posts
13,419
Location
My mom's basement.
Though it won't, maybe even can't happen, but not only the U.S. but perhaps the whole world would be better off without cable news, period. Cable news does NOT report the news, they report opinion, and you know what they say about rearends and opinions. Commentators and pundits are often driving forces today in people's lives, but they are like hired guitar slingers, they play for the money. I have been around long enough to see them switch their opinions, sometimes more than once on the same subject. I put ZERO stock in them.
Yes, the two of us are at an age when we remember the FCC Fairness Doctrine, and what it required went away in the 1980s. I will give it credit for a whole bunch of new sorts of media and broadcast stuff but now one doesn't get the net effect if they don't do something like read both the Wall St. Journal and NY Times for breakfast - read their news first, not the opinion and editorials.
 




Top