Do you get emotional when listening to music?

Alamo

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Can't help it, but tears start rolling when I'm in the kitchen dicing onions and all of a sudden Booker T & the MG's fill the airwaves from the radio .

as if they knew it! :rolleyes:;)
 

Larry F

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I have an auditory processing disability, so unless someone sits down with me and slaps me in the face about what a song is about, I usually just hear the vocals as if it were another instrument. I hear the notes and phrasing but I rarely assign them meaning in themselves or think of what message they might convey. In my old band, I'd have played a song a thousand times and wouldn't have a clue as to what it was about. I'd be all happy about a song and the singer would tell me it was about a little kid getting stabbed in the gutter or something.

I have started singing over the past few years, and the memorization process does inform me of what a song is about. Can't say I get emotional about it though.

The music that does get me the most emotional would have to be classical.

This is me, exactly. One of my favorite, moving pieces of music is Under My Thumb. To me, it is holy, existing in the highest plane of emotional music structure. Over the years, a few words seep into my conscious understanding of the song, which could have easily ruined it for me. I'll admit that the extremely misogynistic lyrics are starting to ruin the song for me. In the past, I was very good at separating pure music from the people who made it and the lyrics from the melody.

BTW, are you speaking of your auditory disability in a casual way, or as a real medical problem?
 

Dismalhead

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This is me, exactly. One of my favorite, moving pieces of music is Under My Thumb. To me, it is holy, existing in the highest plane of emotional music structure. Over the years, a few words seep into my conscious understanding of the song, which could have easily ruined it for me. I'll admit that the extremely misogynistic lyrics are starting to ruin the song for me. In the past, I was very good at separating pure music from the people who made it and the lyrics from the melody.

BTW, are you speaking of your auditory disability in a casual way, or as a real medical problem?

It's a real medical condition. I don't translate verbal information well inside my brain. I have to really focus to pick up information contained in auditory messages and even then it can only be in very simple and short messages. For me to learn something complex I have to see it visually or be physically walked through doing it. I'm really good at doing something from written instructions, and I can usually pick something up very quickly if I write the steps down.
 

fuzzbender

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the biggest problem i have with music, not its fault, is that it ends. and i have no emotion to deal with that. it brings you up and then nothing

the space between music is the problem.
 

Alamo

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the biggest problem i have with music, not its fault, is that it ends. and i have no emotion to deal with that. it brings you up and then nothing

the space between music is the problem.

If there wasn't any space between music it would be like never ending hits on 45.
 

Jebrone Lames

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Smashing Pumpkins: Mellon Collie & The Infinite Sadness is a roller-coaster of emotion. Drummer Jimmy Chamberlain is amazing.

Enjoy:
 

Ash Telecaster

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Originally Posted by Dismalhead said:
I have an auditory processing disability, so unless someone sits down with me and slaps me in the face about what a song is about, I usually just hear the vocals as if it were another instrument. I hear the notes and phrasing but I rarely assign them meaning in themselves or think of what message they might convey. In my old band, I'd have played a song a thousand times and wouldn't have a clue as to what it was about. I'd be all happy about a song and the singer would tell me it was about a little kid getting stabbed in the gutter or something.

I have started singing over the past few years, and the memorization process does inform me of what a song is about. Can't say I get emotional about it though.

The music that does get me the most emotional would have to be classical.

This is me, exactly. One of my favorite, moving pieces of music is Under My Thumb. To me, it is holy, existing in the highest plane of emotional music structure. Over the years, a few words seep into my conscious understanding of the song, which could have easily ruined it for me. I'll admit that the extremely misogynistic lyrics are starting to ruin the song for me. In the past, I was very good at separating pure music from the people who made it and the lyrics from the melody.

BTW, are you speaking of your auditory disability in a casual way, or as a real medical problem?

This is me, exactly. One of my favorite, moving pieces of music is Under My Thumb. To me, it is holy, existing in the highest plane of emotional music structure. Over the years, a few words seep into my conscious understanding of the song, which could have easily ruined it for me. I'll admit that the extremely misogynistic lyrics are starting to ruin the song for me. In the past, I was very good at separating pure music from the people who made it and the lyrics from the melody.

BTW, are you speaking of your auditory disability in a casual way, or as a real medical problem?

This is me exactly as well. I always hear the vocals as a melody instrument and rarely pay attention to the words. I remember thinking Hendrix "House Burning Down" was some kind of awesome metaphor of a persons soul in trouble until I listened more closely and realized it was a war song. I prefer my innitial impression and honestly it changed the way I felt about the song.
 

Wrong-Note Rod

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rarely anymore, but a few songs will bring the water to my eyes or really get the adrenaline pumping.

I'm old and jaded, its hard to move me I guess.
 

4pickupguy

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I have always been more moved by the music than the words because most of the time i'm not listening to them. I've always preferred instrumental music just because it has always been more emotionally moving to me... Thats not to say I haven't been moved by the words of a song... its just 95%-5% thing. A couple of instrumental songs that have literally brought tears to my eyes are Hynm 9/11 by Pierre Bensusan, Where Were You by Jeff Beck. There are a few more. For some reason they send me into retrospective mode to focus on some of the more difficult times in my life and therefore serve as a sort of therapy..... Music can be very power stuff....
 

Jamie Black

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Originally posted by Telemarkman

Quote:
Originally Posted by Western Power
Call me old fashioned, but Nat King Cole did it better.

I'm old fashioned too, but while I like Nat's arrangement, Eva Cassidy's version can actually make me cry. I get the feeling the words mean so much more to her.

This is a really difficult song for me to discuss, I first encountered it after visiting my mom in a nursing home last year. Eva's version instantly spoke to me and conveyed the feelings of loosing a loved one. Nat's version is fine but I agree with Telemarkman.
 




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