Do you get emotional when listening to music?

ac15

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I had a voice teacher who would ask me about a recent performance: Did you get all of it?" What he was asking was whether I sang to my potential or whether I didn't quite get there. Did I get everything out of me that was in there?

As time goes on I find myself getting emotional not just from music or sad things, but any art where the artist "got it all." And realized their vision 100%.

I find myself tearing up and saying " yes, he fuggin did it!"

The beauty of that is very powerful.

I get emotional from that.
 

joeford

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I've seen geezers that age tear up during yogurt commercials.

Throw in a dog or a kid (adult) that reminds them of their own ? Bring out the mops.

when i worked at a nursing home, i walked in on one of my patients hysterically crying. when i asked her what was wrong... she pointed to the TV that was playing one of those sarah mclaughlin abused pets commercials! yeah, its a sad commercial... but wow... you would've thought her kids just died or something...

as for music, i listen to it as an escape. music makes me feel better... its relaxing, or uplifting, or gives me energy. if it makes me cry... i don't think i'd listen to it. although i did get a little teary eyed at promise ring's last show in chicago...
 

LKB3rd

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For me that happens in a live show when an audience all together erupts after a particularly cool part. The entire place comes alive like magic. It's pretty amazing in my opinion.
 

fendertx

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Yes it can make me emotional, usually much more when it is spontaneous rather than me choosing the music. If I am not expect ting the song and it calls up a memory or emotion, it can be very moving. If I'm choosing the playlist I tend not to be effected as much.
 

Del Pickup

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Music to bring tears to my eyes -

Samuel Barber's 'Adagio for Strings'
Fleetwood Mac - Songbird
Mark Knopfler - Theme from Local Hero (Going Home)
Derek & the Dominos - Have You Ever Loved A Woman

Pure emotional moments in each of those records
 

Guitharley

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Music IS powerful. Sometimes with the right song I can smell a certain perfume or recall a very vivid image..... quite often both Hoo-ah
 

BBill64

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I had a voice teacher who would ask me about a recent performance: Did you get all of it?" What he was asking was whether I sang to my potential or whether I didn't quite get there. Did I get everything out of me that was in there?

As time goes on I find myself getting emotional not just from music or sad things, but any art where the artist "got it all." And realized their vision 100%.

I find myself tearing up and saying " yes, he fuggin did it!"

The beauty of that is very powerful.

I get emotional from that.

This is a great post, you put it just right.
 

Ricardo Moraes

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I cannot listen to music and do anything else, like studying or eating. I am so sensitive to music that music is either the best or the worst sensory experience that I have. Music speaks to my heart and to my mind. In reality, my spiritual path had music as its leader. So, to answer your question: YES, I get emmotional when listening to music.
 

acoustic rob

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"I cried over beautiful things knowing no beautiful thing lasts." -- Carl Sandburg

I'm with Carl. I get emotional all the time.
 

tlagosh

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Happens all the time. Certain music more than others. Full disclosure : I'm a crier at movies, etc and so kind of sensitive to begin with. The emotions it brings are why I wanted to play music and perform.
 

Larry F

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Before answering, I'd like to pose a question(s). When you listen to a piece of music, in what way is it emotional: [ed. note. The way that I just posed this undoubtedly temps one to say "all of the above." It's more interesting for me if you don't make a blanket judgment.]

1. A piece of music conveys what the composer and performers were feeling. You are an observer to that, but not a participant, insofar as the emotions of the composer and performers don't change regardless of whether you heard the music or not.

2. A composer uses music to represent abstract emotions. A comedy piece of music is meant to be funny; a dirge is meant to be sad.

3. A composer uses music to stir emotions in you, the listener. In a piece of music, I can make you laugh, and seconds later make you feel very sad.

I am asking these questions in order to understand if, to you, music has properties associated with emotions. Or, am I, the composer, capable of feeling such strong emotions, that I can reveal those to the listener centuries after I am dead. Or, music at a certain tempo with certain accents sounds light-hearted and carefree, while at a slow tempo the music portrays death. As a composer, I am not conveying my understanding of death, nor am I trying to frighten you or make you feel like you are going to die. Rather, I am painting a picture, in sound, of death.
 

fuzzbender

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Before answering, I'd like to pose a question(s). When you listen to a piece of music, in what way is it emotional: [ed. note. The way that I just posed this undoubtedly temps one to say "all of the above." It's more interesting for me if you don't make a blanket judgment.]

1. A piece of music conveys what the composer and performers were feeling. You are an observer to that, but not a participant, insofar as the emotions of the composer and performers don't change regardless of whether you heard the music or not.

2. A composer uses music to represent abstract emotions. A comedy piece of music is meant to be funny; a dirge is meant to be sad.

3. A composer uses music to stir emotions in you, the listener. In a piece of music, I can make you laugh, and seconds later make you feel very sad.

I am asking these questions in order to understand if, to you, music has properties associated with emotions. Or, am I, the composer, capable of feeling such strong emotions, that I can reveal those to the listener centuries after I am dead. Or, music at a certain tempo with certain accents sounds light-hearted and carefree, while at a slow tempo the music portrays death. As a composer, I am not conveying my understanding of death, nor am I trying to frighten you or make you feel like you are going to die. Rather, I am painting a picture, in sound, of death.

Association

not pre or post

more indistinguishable
 

Justinvs

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Before answering, I'd like to pose a question(s). When you listen to a piece of music, in what way is it emotional: [ed. note. The way that I just posed this undoubtedly temps one to say "all of the above." It's more interesting for me if you don't make a blanket judgment.]

1. A piece of music conveys what the composer and performers were feeling. You are an observer to that, but not a participant, insofar as the emotions of the composer and performers don't change regardless of whether you heard the music or not.

2. A composer uses music to represent abstract emotions. A comedy piece of music is meant to be funny; a dirge is meant to be sad.

3. A composer uses music to stir emotions in you, the listener. In a piece of music, I can make you laugh, and seconds later make you feel very sad.

I am asking these questions in order to understand if, to you, music has properties associated with emotions. Or, am I, the composer, capable of feeling such strong emotions, that I can reveal those to the listener centuries after I am dead. Or, music at a certain tempo with certain accents sounds light-hearted and carefree, while at a slow tempo the music portrays death. As a composer, I am not conveying my understanding of death, nor am I trying to frighten you or make you feel like you are going to die. Rather, I am painting a picture, in sound, of death.

That idea could apply to all creative arts when you think about it. Part of my 'job' as a fiction writer is to convey the emotions I want the reader to feel, not just imagery or words, but the anger or joy or fear that makes a scene potent. If I can't get those ideas across on a gut level, I haven't been effective.

With music I can never be sure I am experiencing the same emotions the performer wanted to get across, but I need to feel something for the song to hit me. But when it does, man it hits hard. I know it's not something a fifty-two year old, hard-bitten cowboy should admit to, but I tear up on a fairly regular basis when the music gets to me.
 

fuzzbender

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interesting, what's the difference between a wedding march and a funeral march?

is it musical or associative?

i dunno
 




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