Do you get captain beefheart ?

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by johnny k, Aug 4, 2019.

  1. johnny k

    johnny k Friend of Leo's

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    Wesley Willis ? You ve got a friend in me.
     
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  2. SnidelyWhiplash

    SnidelyWhiplash Friend of Leo's

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    I have Safe As Milk at home in the vinyl graveyard. Need to digg it out for a listen. :cool:
     
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  3. 24 track

    24 track Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

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  4. Flaneur

    Flaneur Friend of Leo's

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    Don/Beefheart didn't draw too many distinctions between different forms of art and you could hear his love of Blues and Jazz, in his singing and playing, pick up on his poetic lyrics, in every song.

    The Spotlight Kid is the record I recommend, to neophytes. A creative, personal Blues take, with killer grooves, fat harp chops and a showcased, Wolf-influenced vocal style , with range, depth and power to spare. He painted the album cover himself, which pointed to his shift towards the visual arts, which was in the works, then.
     
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  5. SuprHtr

    SuprHtr Tele-Meister Silver Supporter

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    I commented once to a friend that Beefheart's lyrics were amazing for the weird images they brought up. My friend said Beefheart was primarily a painter, so his music and lyrics were influenced by his background. Having seen some of his paintings, I guess I agree. I really like Beefheart but only in occasional doses.
     
  6. Sax-son

    Sax-son Tele-Meister

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    For me personally, Captain Beefheart has been sort of an evolutionary following. I remember them from the very early days as a Southern California blues influenced band with the release of Diddy Wah Diddy. They then dabbled with some psychedelia with the release of "Safe as Milk" and then "Strictly Personal". Trout Mask Replica I have mixed reactions for as I value the Avant Garde approach, but some of the material I just didn't care for. My favorite Beefheart records are the Spotlight Kid and Clear Spot. I also like some of his later offerings like Ice Cream for Crow and Bat Chain Puller. Anything aside for those are strictly on a case by case basis.
     
  7. muscmp

    muscmp Tele-Afflicted

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    and, either you do think or not. your choice as with all music!

    play music!
     
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  8. Mike Simpson

    Mike Simpson Doctor of Teleocity

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    I liked the Clear Spot album. I guess it was part of that time in my life... it was 1972.



     
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  9. Toast

    Toast Tele-Holic

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    Some of those ideas have been around for a while.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Epic_theatre

    --Snip--

    Epic theatre is distinct from other forms of theatre, particularly the early naturalistic approach and later "psychological realism" developed by Konstantin Stanislavski. Like Stanislavski, Brecht disliked the shallow spectacle, manipulative plots, and heightened emotion of melodrama; but where Stanislavski attempted to engender real human behaviour in acting through the techniques of Stanislavski's system and to absorb the audience completely in the fictional world of the play, Brecht saw this type of theatre as escapist. Brecht's own social and political focus was distinct, too, from surrealism and the Theatre of Cruelty, as developed in the writings and dramaturgy of Antonin Artaud, who sought to affect audiences viscerally, psychologically, physically, and irrationally. While both produced 'shock' in the audience, epic theatre practices would also include a subsequent moment of understanding and comprehension.
     
  10. PC_Hater

    PC_Hater Tele-Meister

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    As Jimmy Carl Black said 'Zappa is good but Beefheart is the real deal'.
    I met Beefheart after a they played at Warwick University in 1975 or some such year. The room shook when he spoke. You could feel his voice in your chest. Veerrrryyy impressive.
    Then I met Jimmy Carl Black in the late 1990s when he was touring the UK with the Muffin Men playing Zappas music.
    Trout Mask Replica is stunningly wonderfully good. I listen to it a lot and sings bits of it when I am riding my motorcycle.

    If you are new to this stuff then keep trying. But equally, I whistle bits of Stockhausen and like Conlon Nancarrow and Harry Partch...
     
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  11. stevemc

    stevemc Tele-Holic

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    i don't remember when i got it but the guy was a crazed genius.i still enjoy in small doses.much like frank.
     
  12. Danny D

    Danny D TDPRI Member

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    I played in a cover band with Mark Boston aka Rockette Morton for a while. He was an interesting person to say the least. Very humble. He played a fretless bass with perfect intonation.
     
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  13. Toast

    Toast Tele-Holic

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    Maybe it's not that, though. Maybe that's you projecting your themes about what the music means onto the music. Just a thought, no disrespect.
     
  14. MonkeyJefferson

    MonkeyJefferson Tele-Holic

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    Perhaps. Perhaps not. I just don’t need to talk myself into liking an artist. It’s there or it’s not. CB tried too hard to act like they weren’t trying hard for me. No disrespect taken, these are all opinions, not Laws of Nature.
     
  15. Toast

    Toast Tele-Holic

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    I'm not a huge CB fan or Zappa fan. I don't even know most of their songs. [Edit: Don't get me wrong though, I think they are both worth listening to. They both have some great tunes as well.] For me, I have certain songs that I like and the artist is kind of irrelevant. Anyway, I hear you on your critique of CB trying too hard. I chalk a lot of that up to fashion. I increasingly have a hard time separating art from fashion these days. In CB's defense though, I don't really know how an abstract artist who lives out in the desert avoids coming off as different, strange or perhaps trying to lure people into unconventionality (maybe he is, maybe it's good that somebody is :)).

    Anyway, I think some songs have more literal meanings while others are more figurative. CB kind of falls into the figurative camp for me. Most songs I listen to, and even love, I don't know the entire lyric to or much of the lyric or even what I think the artist's intentional meaning is. Nope, I think I construct my own meaning for songs while I'm driving in my car listening to them. There are also songs like the Misfits' "Last Caress" that have such vile lyrics that they have an almost . . . hmm, anti-meaning meaning or at least that's what my ears hear them trying to do (mileage probably varies interpreting that tune :)). Songs like those I get hot and cold on.
     
    Last edited: Aug 6, 2019
  16. jrblue

    jrblue Tele-Afflicted

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    Get? I think so. Care for? Interested in? Not really. Unlike Zappa, I don't think Capt. B has the audience end of the musical experience very much in mind. He's for the few, which is fine.
     
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  17. Dan R

    Dan R Poster Extraordinaire

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    I am going to chime in. I get Capt. Beefheart because he seemed to care about his craft and his approach. He always had a pretty killer lineup. I think he was serious about making his music, much like FZ was with his music.
     
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  18. bricksnbeatles

    bricksnbeatles Tele-Afflicted

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    Sure nuff, n Yes I do.
    That said I think he was by far the least talented individual in the group. Cooder, Walley, and Drumbo were the real stars of the show.
     
  19. DonM

    DonM Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    No.
     
  20. uriah1

    uriah1 Telefied Gold Supporter

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