Do you ever just feel like you're over a certain guitar or type of guitar?

BlueTele

Tele-Meister
Joined
Nov 16, 2008
Posts
239
Location
California
I've had my MIM Classic 50s Strat for over 10 years. It used to be my main instrument when I was a dyed-in-the-wool Strat fan (seriously, if I discovered new players, I'd think, "Man, imagine what they could sound like on a Strat!"). I never really liked the neck profile (which I felt was on the thin side for me, the V was no problem) but it was all I could afford that had a vintage-y vibe to it (small frets, 7.25" radius) at the time.

A few years back, I started gravitating towards two-pickup guitars. The in-between sounds were more what I was getting into. Once I got my first Tele-style guitar (a G&L ASAT Classic), the Strat pretty much became a #2 or even #3 for me. When I would play the Strat, I'd be reminded of others' Strat tones (e.g. "Hey, I'm sounding like Knopfler tonight..."). With two-pickup guitars, I'm reminded of certain players at times (e.g. Robert Lockwood Jr., Bill Frisell, etc.) but I don't seem to think about that as much when I'm playing...it's like I'm more focused on sounding like me.

I've considered selling the Strat since then but I've had it modified a little and banged it up quite a bit so it's really not worth much. Plus, I feel like I'd regret it or suddenly have a need for a Strat as soon as I sell it.

Earlier this week, I took the Strat out for the first time in a while. It's still in tune and plays well. However, I just didn't feel anything. I wasn't inspired to play it. I plugged it in and found it sounded a little harsh. It was almost as if there was no more music to be found in it. I'm not even sure it would be different if I had/bought a different type of Strat.

Any one else ever go off a guitar or a type of guitar like that?
You must be in your early ‘40’s…hahaha. I went through that as well. But first…we all go through those dry desert wasteland periods of no motivation. We aren’t feeling the growth in our playing, and we aren’t hearing what we want to hear. I first noticed it when I found myself going to my acoustic guitars for satisfaction and motivation. I quietly laughed at myself once comparing myself to Neil Young: electric-dominant album followed by acoustic-dominant album, followed by electric-dominant album, followed by acoustic-dominant album, etc. I often switch for long periods of time between electric and acoustic guitar. Then I switch back with a new appreciation and motivation.
I once had 4-5 Strats, a Tele, a Les Paul, and both a solid-body and semi-acoustic Rickenbacker 12-strings (Tom Petty TP660-12 and Roger McGuinn 370-12, respectively). They are “ALL” gone. I found my “nirvana” guitar…a Tele relic/aged guitar made by a small builder who does everything himself and by hand. I’ve played those exclusively for 8 years now. I just recently broke my allegiance and bought another Tele from another builder - a foreign builder half way around the world. I am floored, absolutely floored by the build quality - the “fit and finish” - the tone from the individually custom-wound pickups, and literally every aspect of the guitar. It has actually awakened a new motivation right when I was getting ready to start selling all of electric gear to just play acoustic as I ease into my retirement years.
I hit what you’re feeling, coincidentally with my Strats, at age 45 or so. After selling my Strats, then my Les Paul, and then my Rickenbackers, I realized that I had subconsciously returned to my very first electric by keeping my Telecaster. Then I discovered that small builder, and bought a few over a few years. The Fender Tele is now long gone.
You’ll find your way back. The creative soul needs a break once in a while. Try acoustic, or try a new instrument like mandolin, or bass, or keyboards. And listen to as much new and different music as you can. I discovered a great source of new music: movies. Every time I go to the movies, I hear great music that I’ve never heard before. I am often the last person out of the theater as I quickly write down the songs and bands as the credits scroll. I’ve even shot a screenshot of the music credits so I get them all. Then I search iTunes and buy a slew of new music that then gives me new motivation. Good luck!
 

fjblair

Tele-Afflicted
Joined
Dec 29, 2010
Posts
1,688
Location
NC High Country
That term 'over' seems so ridiculous to me. You liked something, now you don't? Move the hell on. No need to announce it.

'Over' a guitar? You desired something, now you don't? Did you break up with the guitar? Again, move on and live with your dark secret in silence.

What am I missing? Is this just a younger gen thing where you have to announce every emotion you have?
No it's not a younger gen thing. You are missing the part about this being a guitar discussion forum.

Relax.
 

elihu

Doctor of Teleocity
Joined
Dec 24, 2009
Posts
10,767
Location
Texas
For me it’s more of a good vs bad thing. My first Gibson SG was a late 1960’s special. I so wanted to be Pete Townshend. But the neck was like it was made of rubber-I couldn’t keep it in tune to save my life. But my first strat was a Tokai Goldtone series from 1980 that was white with a faux tweed case. It looked great, sounded great and I felt like Jimmie Vaughn! And it is the only guitar I’ve ever sold for more than I paid.

Guess which one I want back?

:twisted::twisted:
 
Last edited:

Bobbyoso

TDPRI Member
Joined
Aug 22, 2008
Posts
93
Age
70
Location
Bellevue WA
Les Pauls. Have played dozens since 1965, including some holy grail 50s ones at 48th st in NYC in the 60s-90s, never wanted to own one. Closest I got was my 1973 L-5S, bought new at Mannys, still own it, but it's about #7 or so of my first-team instruments. And it actually plays and stays in tune, maybe the only Gibson solidbody I've ever played that does, but I'm a jazz guy and 24.xxx" scale guitars have to be really accurately built and set up to play extended chords; Suhrs, TAs, and PRS often are, but LPs rarely are. I believe my L-5S is longer scale, which may be why it does stay in tune--or it could just be that as their top-line solidbody back then, costing 2x what a LP Custom did (and probably being more of a jazz instrument, intonation was pretty critical), they took exceptional care to get that right.

In addition, I intensely dislike the two vol/two tone pot setup; never had a use for mid position on two-pup HB guitars-ever- so the second vol pot is just an opportunity to grab the wrong one.

At this point IMO, every LP tone has been done to death for over 60 years, esp LP>>Marshall, as well. I'm not a cover band player, so that's not something I'm interested in revisiting.

And (flame away), there are very well-built guitars out there with 60 years' of improvements, like SS frets, better woods, better neck heels, better bridges, locking tuners (NOT robot tuners), built by guys who are trying to build the best tools, not a lifestyle or musical virtue signalling statement with 3 oz of wood filler around a set of easy oblong or trapezoidal inlays. Again, some Pauls are built reasonably well, but they're a total crapshoot until you get to the R-x reissues, at which price you could have David Myka or CP Thornton, etc., build you a custom dream guitar. Imo, anyway.

I do love 50s and 60s Gibson hollows like the Super 4, L-5, Citation, Barney Kessell, and the more recent Pat Martino model, but I've just never bonded with Les Pauls, even when there were good ones around at less than $500.
 

Jimclarke100

Friend of Leo's
Joined
Sep 8, 2009
Posts
2,148
Location
Horsham, UK
I have to be careful about getting over things else I’ll end up with zippo to play.
Had an early 80s Squier Strat for a while - great guitar but the only thing it did was convince me that I didn’t get on with Strats. At all.
Never played a Les Paul that I enjoyed (Except juniors)
PRS’s just turn me off. Right or wrong the birds and the sideboard woods turn me off the brand.
Anything else with those fancy ups woods are off the menu.
Anything pointy, just no.

I seem to be gravitating to a simple, no frills instrument so Teles are hanging in there. LPJs appeal too. Current favorite is my Gordon Smith GS1 -an LPJ-ish beast; plain brown wood with a single pickup.
 

loopfinding

Poster Extraordinaire
Joined
Jun 19, 2011
Posts
5,235
Location
europe endless
Strats and Les Pauls.

Strat was my first and I grew to not like it. SG special was after that and it blew it out of the water for me. I didn’t play it for like 15 years. I do like playing it on the neck pup occasionally these days, but I don’t think I’d buy one otherwise.

The Les Paul I got because I wanted to “trade up” from the SG. I played it a lot for the first two years I had it and then just went back to the SG. It has sat in a case for over a decade. I just don’t find Les Pauls to be comfortable, and my SG and 335 do everything it does and more.
 

Blazer

Doctor of Teleocity
Ad Free Member
Joined
Dec 2, 2003
Posts
17,686
Age
46
Location
The Netherlands
Lester.jpg

Les Pauls, I tried my hardest, but I can't bond with them.

Lester 2.jpg

They feel too blocky, too awkward. They're just not my kind of guitar.
 

loopfinding

Poster Extraordinaire
Joined
Jun 19, 2011
Posts
5,235
Location
europe endless
Jazzmasters, too.
I have owned a few, my first Fender was an L plate (63-64) sunburst Jazzmaster, acquired by my Dad in 1970 for $250.
I was a grateful 13 year old.
They play beautifully, but are sonically a little uninspiring, IMO.

Yeah same here. Really love the feel of them and the trem. But sonically they always just sound like either indie rock or Western swing tones to me. That neck pickup being past the 24th fret node severely limits the tonal range of the guitar, and gives it a noticeable signature that you may not always want.
 

loopfinding

Poster Extraordinaire
Joined
Jun 19, 2011
Posts
5,235
Location
europe endless
View attachment 1007129
Les Pauls, I tried my hardest, but I can't bond with them.

View attachment 1007134
They feel too blocky, too awkward. They're just not my kind of guitar.

A tele scales down a guitar body but leaves the waist curves as gradual as many archtops or acoustics. Same with the SG.

But a Les Paul scales the whole guitar shape down, and the micro/sharp angled waist just makes the guitar incredibly awkward. It may have been “prettier” or more traditional looking in the 50s, but ergonomically it is a horrible design compared to the tele.
 

Blazer

Doctor of Teleocity
Ad Free Member
Joined
Dec 2, 2003
Posts
17,686
Age
46
Location
The Netherlands
Yeah same here. Really love the feel of them and the trem. But sonically they always just sound like either indie rock or Western swing tones to me. That neck pickup being past the 24th fret node severely limits the tonal range of the guitar, and gives it a noticeable signature that you may not always want.
Which is funny seeing how metal players have discovered the Jazzmaster Baritone model and Jazzmaster pickups in general.


 

Gnometowner

Tele-Meister
Joined
Feb 1, 2022
Posts
384
Age
70
Location
Stillwater Oklahoma
Les Pauls. Have played dozens since 1965, including some holy grail 50s ones at 48th st in NYC in the 60s-90s, never wanted to own one. Closest I got was my 1973 L-5S, bought new at Mannys, still own it, but it's about #7 or so of my first-team instruments. And it actually plays and stays in tune, maybe the only Gibson solidbody I've ever played that does, but I'm a jazz guy and 24.xxx" scale guitars have to be really accurately built and set up to play extended chords; Suhrs, TAs, and PRS often are, but LPs rarely are. I believe my L-5S is longer scale, which may be why it does stay in tune--or it could just be that as their top-line solidbody back then, costing 2x what a LP Custom did (and probably being more of a jazz instrument, intonation was pretty critical), they took exceptional care to get that right.

In addition, I intensely dislike the two vol/two tone pot setup; never had a use for mid position on two-pup HB guitars-ever- so the second vol pot is just an opportunity to grab the wrong one.

At this point IMO, every LP tone has been done to death for over 60 years, esp LP>>Marshall, as well. I'm not a cover band player, so that's not something I'm interested in revisiting.

And (flame away), there are very well-built guitars out there with 60 years' of improvements, like SS frets, better woods, better neck heels, better bridges, locking tuners (NOT robot tuners), built by guys who are trying to build the best tools, not a lifestyle or musical virtue signalling statement with 3 oz of wood filler around a set of easy oblong or trapezoidal inlays. Again, some Pauls are built reasonably well, but they're a total crapshoot until you get to the R-x reissues, at which price you could have David Myka or CP Thornton, etc., build you a custom dream guitar. Imo, anyway.

I do love 50s and 60s Gibson hollows like the Super 4, L-5, Citation, Barney Kessell, and the more recent Pat Martino model, but I've just never bonded with Les Pauls, even when there were good ones around at less than $500.
L5s hàs been on my gotta have since I saw Neal Schon playing a cherry burst one with Journey opening for The Doobie Brothers at a Bill Graham Cow Palace New Years eve show back around 72. Ñow they are too expensive
 

DekeDog

Tele-Afflicted
Joined
May 12, 2019
Posts
1,859
Location
Carolina
There are only two guitars I've ever NOT been over. I keep thinking I'm over my Tele, but I got a buzz the other night, and I was in love with that Tele all over again. Man, it was like it was a part of me. That neck and I were one. We got a room.
 

Cosmic Cowboy

Tele-Afflicted
Joined
Dec 10, 2020
Posts
1,266
Location
New Mexico
I don't play either of my LPs much anymore. I guess I'm playing almost exclusively single coils these days. They are just much more percussive with more attack.
 

Cali Dude

Friend of Leo's
Joined
May 20, 2020
Posts
2,034
Age
59
Location
California
For me it guitars with trem. I used to love bigsby equipped guitars. The problem in my experience is keeping them in tune.
 

thunderbyrd

Poster Extraordinaire
Silver Supporter
Joined
Dec 21, 2004
Posts
8,515
Age
63
Location
central ky
i am over firebirds and flying v's. i think i am over SGs. i ought to be over LPs cause when i've had one i didn't play it much, but i will probably get another one some day.

and teles. i still love teles in a way, but every time i've had one has been the same routine: for the first month or so, i love it, then i decide i don't like what i'm hearing from it.

but i am very surprised to report i am now into a type of guitar i have utterly ignored up until now: the Les Paul Junior (by way of eastman). i've always really liked LP Specials because of two p90s and the binding around the neck, but the idea of a one pickup guitar was anathema. Boy, was i wrong.

so for the immediate future, it's strats and LP Jrs for me. that ought to be enough, but you know how it goes. see my sig.
 

blowtorch

Telefied
Ad Free Member
Joined
May 2, 2003
Posts
39,879
Location
Wisco
yeah I've got I think 4 strats, 5 if you count a mini deal.
2 of em are actually really cool
and I just never play em
 

39martind18

Friend of Leo's
Joined
Jul 31, 2012
Posts
3,871
Age
71
Location
Spring TX
In my case, it's not so much being over a couple of guitars as it is just never being into them. Strats head my list- never could bond with the sounds I got from them (too thin). Next are Les Pauls- sound was fine, but my back rebelled greatly at the weight. Lastly, SGs- I just never got into them.
 




New Posts

Top