Do People Say This Where You Live?

boneyguy

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I get it, but if I got irritated at every grammatical gaff, I'd be taking a dirt nap by now.
I've decided to pay attention to what I'm paying attention to. (Yes, this dangling preposition is okay.)
It's the fact that it's becoming so widespread, this particular phrase. I don't care if I heard it once from someone....but the fact that such nonsense is becoming readily adopted is a bit troublesome to me. And I'm not losing sleep over this...it's a very minor irritation but a much bigger mystery as to how this widespread acceptance happens.
 

oregomike

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It's the fact that it's becoming so widespread, this particular phrase. I don't care if I heard it once from someone....but the fact that such nonsense is becoming readily adopted is a bit troublesome to me. And I'm not losing sleep over this...it's a very minor irritation but a much bigger mystery as to how this widespread acceptance happens.
What bugs me more is the conversion of nouns and verbs and vice versa.

"What is their ask?."
"Do you even language, bro?"
 

tfarny

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Well, OP either just hates everything, or really misunderstands how language is used in the real world.
There are thousands of fixed expressions that don't follow standard phrase structure grammar rules. In fact multi-word expressions of this type are so ubiquitous they are changing our understanding of what "grammar rules" really consist of and if they actually exist as rules.

 

dlew919

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We have some bad news. You family has died. But have a great rest of the day.
 

tfarny

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Oh yes....that's on my list too....I don't like the optics of that whole situation.......baaaaaarffff. It's very impactful.....aaaarrrggghhpfffffft.
optics (plural noun) and impactful (adj) have probably been in the OED for a very long time. In fact I'm not even sure what problem you might have with those. Your examples are the first and second meanings listed in Webster's. Grumpy much?



English allows fairly free conversion of words from one class to another, both in slang and more standard versions of speech, due to its simple morphology. Wait till you hear that some individual people want to be addressed as "they" and not as "he" or "she"! That will blow your mind. Maybe you'll hear about the phenomenon one day. :)
 

blueruins

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Agree with OP…unnecessarily awkward.

That sort of phrase strikes me as someone with a deficit trying to sound intelligent. The same sort who use multi-syllable words incorrectly.

I work in retail and the job requires that you “greet” every person who walks in the door.

It always amazes me that someone will bristle at common phrase such as “good morning”, “welcome”, “how you doing?”, etc…

Even in agreement this thread makes me disappointed in humanity to see that so many people harbor enough resentment in life to bristle at polite conventions.

That someone is so self-absorbed that they feel a stranger should have an awareness of their personal peeves and preferences is beyond my understanding.

Have a great rest of your post man.
 

somebodyelseuk

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One of the great/irritating things about the internet is how constant repetition of a phrase can spread it globally.
I see Americans using terms like 'that's boss, that is' these days. That was a strictly Scouse phrase up until a couple of years ago. Been used on Merseyside for generations. Never heard it used anywhere else, even in the North West of England, until a couple of years ago.

Now, I'd love to get the world using 'old phrases', maybe, they still use them in London, such as 'Be lucky' and 'Mind how you go'.


In terms of 'shop workers'. Here in the UK, in general, not a particularly well paid job, so the people doing the jobs are either students, or 'don't have options', so I will always try to be pleasant, ask how they're doing and take a genuine interest. It can't be easy worrying about how to pay the bills and facing an endless stream of 'robots' eight hours a day everyday.
 
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Cloodie

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I'm in the UK. Never heard anyone use that phrase before
 

blueruins

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Another aspect some may not have considered is that your shop person has possibly had to extend a salutation or pleasant farewell a few hundred times that day. The repetition is mind-numbing and can cause one to feel disingenuous when repeated in the exact manner to each individual.

There are some who may start to therefore flex a little creativity. For the more banal it may be adopting a pet phrase which to them evokes a more sophisticated and earnest persona…”Have a great rest of your day, sir☺️

Shopfolk may struggle for ways to keep the conversation creative and engaging while fulfilling their obligations.

Recently I asked some tourists how they were enjoying our city to which they replied curtly “We have just arrived.”

As someone who has conducted millions of such mini-interviews, my skills enabled me to detect a minute trace of distaste that the two had experienced at having been addressed so casually by someone beneath their caste.

“Oh?” I retorted. “And which planet are you two from?”

Immediately, I could see that the bounds of convention had been stretched beyond their breaking point. These conventions and variations exist to keep you from having conversations like this with shop people.
 

David Barnett

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'Have a great rest of your day'..

I've never heard it outside of a retail or commercial situation...it's become a sort of corporate jargon of sorts I think..corporate speak. There was an upscale hair salon/hair-cutting school in town here called Aveda that had their employees answer the phone with "It's a great day at Aveda!!..how may I help you?". You can help me by not engaging in bizarre corporate speak that you've been robotically programmed to say into the phone...that would be an excellent start.

Staff at a local county government office where I used to work are forced to answer the phone "It's a great day at the Assessor's Office!"

It's like a form of torture.
 

cyclopean

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They mostly say, "have a blessed day" down here. What really grinds my gears is when I say "thank you" after a cashier transaction and they say "you're welcome". What happened to the representative of the merchant that I am choosing to do business with thanking me for my patronage of their establishment?
At least no one in salem has said “blessed be” to me after finishing a purchase. But those bumper stickers are everywhere.
 

Tonetele

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HARD YAKKA. Yakka was a brand of work trousers. Hard Yakka means a bloody hard daoy's work, sweat, shovels, heat- in all an exhausting day's work. That's old Australian slang. If you've done a days Hard Yakka you just want a shower and a sleep- not even a beer.
 

flathd

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I think I've heard it before, I don't recall where, when, or who said it. I probably replied with "You too" and forgot about it.

If it really bothered me, I might say.." It'll be the best rest of the day I've ever had". Now, do you mind if I get some best rest of the day and take a nap?
 




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