Do I really need a tuner pedal?

fjrabon

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What I mean there is that if you tune a guitar to a perfect note, it will likely be off with itself somewhere. Some tuning "cheating" is often needed.

Let's say that you tune your A and G strings to perfect A and G notes. But when you shape a basic D chord, your G string pressed to the A note may be somewhat sharp with your open A string. No matter how perfectly the nut cut, the set up, the frets, etc., guitars have some kind of tuning imperfection that sometimes need strings to be cheated a bit sharp/flat to maximize them being in tune in general across the keys, fretted notes, etc. Some have to be retuned a bit to that they're in tune in certain keys. E.g., I have two that, despite being perfectly set up, need their B and G strings cheated a bit flat in the tuning if I'm playing in the keys of E and A vs the keys of G, C, D, etc.

So, yes, what Radiohead, like others, said above:
"Certain guitars don't sound as good for certain songs because of specific overtones, which may be caused by the exact position on the pickups, or overtones caused by the hardware or whatever."

This doesn't really have anything to do with tuning. And a chromatic tuner can tune to any fret you want. You don't have to tune to open strings.

I'm still completely unsure what having the tuning the "right way for the singer's voice" thing is.
 

Teleguy61

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Playing out of tune used to be pretty common--see:Grateful Dead and others.
Now, tuners are so easy to use and inexpensive, why not use one?
Any professional act you see tunes constantly. It sounds better.
For my money, there is no excuse for playing out of tune today.
I like to tune befor each song. It takes seconds.
Pedal tuner v clip on:mute function is very handy.
I use whichever works best for the gig I'm on.
 

fjrabon

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Not saying that being tuned to ideal note is undesirable. Just that given the imperfections of one guitar, compounded by that of another, and a bass, sometimes one must deviate from the ideal note to get the imperfect instruments maximally in tune. E.g., if the fretted G string is a bit sharp on the 3rd fret for two of the guitars, then cheating the open G string a biiiit flat might be in order, making the ideal G note a reference point but not exactly our setting.

The intention is not to be out of tune for a singer, or generally, but to adjust for imperfections nimbly enough to minimize being out of tune. Let's say the song is in C, but the singer sings it best just a little sharp of C. So tuning to accommodate that (when we're not using keyboards or something else making us stick to ideal pitch) is what we'd do. Again making the ideal note just a reference point.

I don't like to hear endless tuning fiddling, either. I grumble, "I can do that myself." But if a well-synched band can tune quickly and has to tune variously, I was asking what advantages the tuning pedal offered.

A tuner would actually make tuning flat or sharp easier, not harder.

You talk about not wanting somebody to fuss with a tuner, then you say that your entire band will sometimes tune their guitars slightly sharp by ear to accommodate one song?! This is flabberghasting to me.
 

fjrabon

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Yes. But I didn't claim we are sane!
Regardless, if you actually do this, a tuning pedal would make it easier, not harder. A decent tuner will not only tell you what note you're closest to, but also exactly how sharp or flat you are.

If you do the things you say, you're actually the perfect candidate for a quality chromatic tuning pedal.
 

RoscoeElegante

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personally, I have 3.

One for the pedal board
One for the bench
One for whoever (bassist) has lost their clip on that day because someone (bassist) always loses theirs

Do they suck tone or do any mischief in the pedal chain? (I've never used one, so the question isn't snide. I'm a true newbie about these.)
 

Mr Green Genes

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I got by without a tuner for decades, and never felt the need for one.

I have one now, and I like it. It makes doing setups much easier.
 

RoscoeElegante

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If you do the things you say, you're actually the perfect candidate for a quality chromatic tuning pedal.

Is there a particular pedal you'd recommend? (FWIW, my only brand-aversion is to Boss pedals. I find them buzzy/noisy.) And why would I cook up the kookiness??
 

fjrabon

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Is there a particular pedal you'd recommend? (FWIW, my only brand-aversion is to Boss pedals. I find them buzzy/noisy.)
Korg pitch black, sonic research turbo tuner or TC polytune are the most common recs for high quality. I have a fairly cheap donner tuner that works for me. I also have a korg pitch black that I was happy with, but needed something smaller to fit on my board.

Anything with true bypass won't have a buzzing issue because you don't use the pedal while you're playing. And when you're tuning output is muted.
 

Mr Green Genes

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Have to ask.... but unless the Piano is digital how do you know it's at proper pitch?

In a professional environment, it's not necessarily important that A= exactly 440 Hz. What is important is that all the instruments are in tune with each other.

It's much easier to tune a guitar to a piano than it is to tune a piano to a guitar.
 

4pickupguy

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That's intriguing. What particular pedal do you use for that?

IMG_1005.JPG


Ernie Ball VPjr.. has a separate output for the tuner...
 

Chicago Matt

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Do they suck tone or do any mischief in the pedal chain? (I've never used one, so the question isn't snide. I'm a true newbie about these.)

You are adding length, possible noise, and another possible point of failure to the signal chain, but no more so than any other pedal.
 

MrTwang

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Personally, I hate the look of those clip on tuners - the on;t time I ever use one is if I'm playing an acoustic instrument in the studio.

For live work, I always use a pedal tuner (or a multi FX unit with a tuner built in). It is impossible to tune up on a noisy stage with a DJ going full blast. I generally only tune up just before each set and only check with the tuner mid set if I hear that something doesn't sound right. In one of the bands I play in, one song has a lengthy piano intro and I don't play till about half way through the song and so usually take that opportunity to do a quick tuning check.

If using separate pedals, I really like the TC Electronic polytune. Just strum all 6 open strings together and the tuner will tell you if any of them are out and, of course, which one(s) which makes things easy.
 

Mr Green Genes

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if the fretted G string is a bit sharp on the 3rd fret for two of the guitars, then cheating the open G string a biiiit flat might be in order, making the ideal G note a reference point but not exactly our setting.

I can tune an open G string a few cents flat with a tuner just as easily as I can with a reference note. In fact, if you're tuning flat of the reference note, it's easier with a tuner.

The intention is not to be out of tune for a singer, or generally, but to adjust for imperfections nimbly enough to minimize being out of tune. Let's say the song is in C, but the singer sings it best just a little sharp of C.

One thing I've never done is to tune my instrument to the singer, especially as a former keyboardist.

If your singer can't find the note, Antares might have a more practical solution for you.

I don't like to hear endless tuning fiddling, either. I was asking what advantages the tuning pedal offered.

Silent onstage tuning, so the audience doesn't have to listen to you tune your instrument.



.
 

Kingpin

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If you're performing in public, get a tuner.

All modesty aside, I have a very good ear for pitch and I would never consider gigging without a tuner. No one wants to listen to a guitarist tuning in between songs.
 

Frfly

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I've got a clip-on and my amp has a tuner built in (orange crush 20 RT). I also have a tuning fork. I don't get, if I did I might get a tuner pedal, because muted tuning and general ability to mute seems like a good idea, and you get the ability to have a self-sufficient pedal board to carry and use with any amp.
 

codamedia

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In a professional environment, it's not necessarily important that A= exactly 440 Hz. What is important is that all the instruments are in tune with each other.

It's much easier to tune a guitar to a piano than it is to tune a piano to a guitar.

Absolutely. I had misinterpreted what the op was saying in that situation.
 




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