Do I need to change this pot to match the cap? Please advise.

Discussion in 'Tele-Technical' started by dscottyg, May 12, 2021.

  1. dscottyg

    dscottyg Tele-Meister

    Age:
    54
    Posts:
    270
    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2020
    Location:
    Jacksonville
    I’m going to replace a .47 with a .05 cap to restore a used 2001 American Designer Edition Silver Sparkle back to factory specs. I’ll be putting in new custom shop Texas Special pups and a .05 capacitor which it originally had. I’ve learned that the pups and wiring were the same as the Merle Haggard for which I was able to get the wiring diagram. The tone pot that’s there now is 250k, and I’m just assuming it was the original, unless you think there’s reason to think a former owner would have changed it when they changed the pickups or the capacitor. Do you think it’s fine to keep the pot as is and just do the pups and cap?
    Current tone pot and cap: 791844CE-EC7C-4930-B65F-9E47E7B55C0B.jpeg 87399C36-A8C3-49EB-9E49-B7401211FDE7.jpeg Wiring diagram:
    F50CAF2D-A36F-4728-BA8C-5CD34DD216DB.png CEE363B9-ECF7-403C-977E-8E2476002AE2.png
    F373B214-1008-4C8C-86F1-3E6EDE961B43.png
     
    Flip G and stepvan like this.
  2. Ricky D.

    Ricky D. Doctor of Teleocity

    Age:
    70
    Posts:
    11,204
    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2006
    Location:
    Marion, VA
    I'd keep it.
     
  3. tfarny

    tfarny Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    5,050
    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2008
    Location:
    Hudson Valley, NY
    Why would you change the pot unless it is not working, or you are looking for a brighter tone? And why change the cap?
     
  4. kbold

    kbold Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    2,375
    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2015
    Location:
    Australia
    0.047uF ... not 0.47uF
    Taking capacitor tolerances into account, there will be no effective difference (tonally) between .047 and .05uF
    Pot: keep it (it's probably the original pot).
     
    RodeoTex, Geo, jondanger and 3 others like this.
  5. garrett

    garrett Tele-Afflicted

    Posts:
    1,534
    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2007
    Location:
    Just south of Tampa Bay
    Exactly. You don't stand to gain anything here.
     
    dscottyg likes this.
  6. AJBaker

    AJBaker Friend of Leo's

    Age:
    34
    Posts:
    4,166
    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2010
    Location:
    Switzerland
    I doubt it's .47uF (that would be pretty useless in a guitar and would only let the deepest frequencies through when turned down.
    I bet it's .047uF, which is identical to .05uF.

    These caps often have a 10-20% tolerance, so there it's absolutely nothing to gain by swapping those caps.
     
    SRHmusic likes this.
  7. dscottyg

    dscottyg Tele-Meister

    Age:
    54
    Posts:
    270
    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2020
    Location:
    Jacksonville
    I don’t know a lot about the science behind it. I’m just assuming Fender experts knew what they were doing and I’m trying to get it back to how they originally designed it.
     
  8. dscottyg

    dscottyg Tele-Meister

    Age:
    54
    Posts:
    270
    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2020
    Location:
    Jacksonville
    Great. Thanks. That all makes sense. I actually saw the Pure Vintage 250k pot for sale on Sweetwater, and the photos and part number confirm that the pot that’s in there now is the same as the diagram. And it makes sense not to change the cap if it’s .047. I actually broke the solder when getting out the pot to take the picture. So, I might actually get a cap that looks like the one in the photo just to keep it more authentic, since I’d have to resolder it anyway when I’m putting in the pickups.
     
  9. LutherBurger

    LutherBurger Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    5,752
    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2013
    Location:
    NYC
    If you're interested, you can check the date code on the pot to determine when it was manufactured.

    It's a 4-digit number stamped into the shell. The first two digits represent the year of manufacture and the other two, the week of that year. If it's the original pot, the first two digits are probably 00 or 01.
     
  10. tfarny

    tfarny Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    5,050
    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2008
    Location:
    Hudson Valley, NY
    I see. It doesn't sound like anything significant was changed, so if it all works fine and you like how it sounds, there is really no need to change anything back. 047 and .050 are in real terms the same values for a capacitor. And pots all do the same thing. A 250k pot will contribute to a slightly darker overall tone than a 500k pot. Depending on how you play, you might not find the difference to be audible (especially if you keep the tone on 10). Fender is known for using 250k pots, but actually they have used other values over the decades in many cases (and the numerical values stated on the component are just an estimate anyhow). There is no reason for insisting on a certain value other than that it contributes to the sound you like.
     
  11. garrett

    garrett Tele-Afflicted

    Posts:
    1,534
    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2007
    Location:
    Just south of Tampa Bay
    Capacitors are one of the great internet forum debates. But you're right, Fender knew (know) what they're doing and have used ceramic disc capacitors for a gazillion years because they are cheap, available, and fit-for-purpose.

    The Mojo Dijon cap in there now is considered an "upgrade" capacitor. Some people swear by such caps, but bottom line is, if you're happy with the way the tone control works/sounds right now, you would very likely notice zero difference if you replaced it with a 0.05uF ceramic cap.

    All that said, I get it if you want the guitar to be 100% stock. It's a super cheap update to put an original style ceramic cap back in. So if that makes you like the guitar better, go for it!
     
  12. Boreas

    Boreas Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

    Age:
    66
    Posts:
    3,904
    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2019
    Location:
    Adirondack Coast, NY
    You can probably re-use that Mojo cap if you are careful. See if there is any excess where it attached on the far end. Desolder that end and pull it out as far as you can and still make contact. Resolder the far end, and you should have enough on the broken end to resolder it as well. I have even spliced a broken lead like that with a small piece of similar wire.
     
  13. DavidP

    DavidP Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    3,231
    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2003
    Location:
    Vancouver BC, Canada
    If you're pulling anything and have a multimeter, I'd measure the actual cap and pot values to see what they really are, and make an executive decision to replace based on those measured values.
     
  14. Boreas

    Boreas Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

    Age:
    66
    Posts:
    3,904
    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2019
    Location:
    Adirondack Coast, NY
    FWIW, you can make it stock, but you can never make it original again. The upgrades that were made would not be likely to alter the "stock" tone anyway. You can spend time and treasure putting in components that were "likely" stock, I would doubt anyone could tell the difference tonally. As others have said, fix the broken solder joint and rock on!
     
IMPORTANT: Treat everyone here with respect, no matter how difficult!
No sex, drug, political, religion or hate discussion permitted here.