Do Any Of You Wsp Have A Bluegrass Side?

Discussion in 'Worship Service Players' started by Platefire, Mar 7, 2016.

  1. Platefire

    Platefire Friend of Leo's

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    I'm an old Bluz Rocker from way back and when I got saved worked hard to incorporate my style into current traditional, contemporary and original Christian music.

    The thing about it is I love the mountains and always related the sound of the Mandolin to the mountains. About 15 years ago I bought an old vintage Kay Mando. When I play it I do it in the Bluegrass style. It seems that everybody including my wife grins and winks when they see dragging my mando out. This is not very traditional as far as die hard bluegrass lovers go but my favorite Bluegrass album is "Crabgrass" by the Crab Family. I really get a kick out of playing my Mando in that style and praising the Lord with it. Just wonder if there is any others out there with a streak of Bluegrass???

    Platefire
     

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    Last edited: Mar 7, 2016
  2. southpaw pete

    southpaw pete Tele-Meister

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    Absolutely! I love all sorts of folk music and enjoy adding a little flavour here and there. My wife and I spent a few years living in SW Kentucky, and really fell in love with the people and music of the area. I'm usually on guitar, so my wife will sometimes pull out the mandolin (or whistles or accordion... for a more Celtic feel), and always gets a great response. There is something really fun and beautiful about bluegrass. Now only if I could flat pick like Tony Rice etc...!!!

    I love changing up the arrangements to common songs in our set, whether hymns or Hillsong or whatever, and trying them with different instrumentation: whether it is giving an "unplugged" bluegrass or Celtic feel to them, or full on distorted electric guitars to a normally acoustic song. Keeps the songs fresh and sometimes highlights something different about the meaning of the words, if that makes sense.

    Keep it up with the ol' mando!
     
  3. 4 Cat Slim

    4 Cat Slim Friend of Leo's

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    I suspect there are lots of us doing something similar.
    I play guitar in a praise band at church and sometimes (though not too often),
    I get a chance to work my dobro into arrangements. Dobro tends to add a traditional-sounding quality to just about anything. The instrument gets a lot of positive responses, a lot of questions about what it is. Most people have heard its distinctive sound, but had no idea of the instrument responsible for that sound.If anything, I tend to refrain from using it more because I want the words and their meaning to be the focus of what we do.
     
  4. southpaw pete

    southpaw pete Tele-Meister

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    I recently played a dobro at a local store and just LOVED the sweet tone of it. Been thinking about picking one up ever since. It is so unique.
    I know what you mean though about not wanting it to be distracting, but often times those unique sounds can also really make a difference in someone's worship experience (once the whole "what is that thing?" reaction wears off haha). As I mentioned earlier, my wife often plays a lot of fun and interesting instruments during worship, which may be distracting at first, but in the long run adds so much more to the sound and experience, helping people connect to God through the music.
     
  5. 4 Cat Slim

    4 Cat Slim Friend of Leo's

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    I agree with you, southpaw pete. It's a fine line, sometimes. But if in the long run your adding instrumental voices to the mix helps people connect and enjoy their worship experience, I'm all for it.
    Apparently, the enormous popularity of the movie and soundtrack of "Oh Brother, Where Art Thou" increased the general awareness and appreciation for a lot of traditional music sounds, and I'm glad it did so.
    I hope you get a dobro and add it to your array of sounds. I'm no virtuoso by any means, but we have fun with it.
     
  6. dmitri

    dmitri Tele-Holic

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    I have a bit of that deep down - I don't play mandolin or banjo, but I am constantly getting laughed at by my teammates at church for tossing in bluegrassy and country licks during inopportune moments (not really yelled at or anything, just knowing chuckles since I am the only one on the team who likes that kinda thing). When I lead, there is a definite country vibe (about once a month) in the old-school Emmy Lou Harris, Willy Nelson kinda way. Again, not always, but I do like it.
     
  7. kkfaudio

    kkfaudio TDPRI Member

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    I just added this to the stable.. More for Rend Collective type of stuff, but we'll veer into slightly country/bluegrass from time to time.


    IMG_1817.JPG
     
  8. Platefire

    Platefire Friend of Leo's

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    Thanks you for all of you putting your two bits in!
    I suspected I wasn't the only one:>)

    Being a guy who loves to burn on my Les Paul, tele or strat and would never give it up unless the Lord said so or the electrical grid would disappear%>/. There is something liberating about playing an acoustic instrument in dif than normal style for you without being encumbered with boxes, amp and cords. Everybody has their favorite instrument in mind when they think about playing like that. Being a guy that lives in Louisiana who only gets to see the mountains occasionally, playing the mando takes me there in spirit. In the morning light, a hot cup of coffee, the Word of God and a Mando can do wonders. Platefire

    BTW-I would recommend highly you listening to "The Happy Song" from the Crabgrass Album by the Crab Family.
     
    Last edited: Mar 7, 2016
  9. kkfaudio

    kkfaudio TDPRI Member

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    Cool - I'm digging that Happy Song. Something to aspire to as I learn to play the mandolin!

    Thanks for the link,
    Kevin
     
  10. Old Bill

    Old Bill Tele-Holic

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    I absolutely love Bluegrass. Unfortunately there isn't much of it about near me.
     
  11. Platefire

    Platefire Friend of Leo's

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    Keven---your welcome!!! You know I never even thought of that song as bluegrass because it was more contemporary Christian style in its original form. I love that bluegrass treatment they did to it and the interplay of all the instruments. The words are great too, about new life and hope in Christ! Makes me want to get real Happy! Ye haw!!



    Old Bill

    I'm like you, nobody around me likes it including my wife:.). I would love to play my mando in a group setting with other bluegrass players but don't know anybody who's into it---so I guess I'll carry on by myself. Platefire
     
    Last edited: Mar 10, 2016
  12. babalooga

    babalooga Tele-Holic

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    I've been playing hard core bluegrass (think Stanley Bros.,Jimmy Martin etc.) on guitar and mandolin for over thirty years. I was invited to play on the worship team as a mandolin player. It wasn't long before I was playing electric guitar in addition. These days I'm playing more elec. guitar, but when I play my mandolin the people really seem to love it. The only down side is people come up to me and tell me love to hear my ukelele
     
  13. Platefire

    Platefire Friend of Leo's

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    babalooga

    Yeah, sometime the mando don't get much respect around non-bluegrass fans. Glad to talk to someone with a lot of Bluegrass experience. May want to pick your brain a bit:>)

    Tell me this, do you play a lot of lead mandolin?
    I'm working on it, but I seem to highly favor the key of G. I sing a lot in G, so that's a natural for me but I'm trying to break out to other keys.
    Do you have favorite keys are you all over the place?

    Another problem I have for example is the break neck speed that bluegrass get up to. For an example, "The Happy Song" on you tube on post #8. That speed I find pretty common in traditional bluegrass but I have problems maintaining that rhythm on acoustic guitar or mando. Any suggestions on how to build up to that speed. I would think, start slow as you can handle and practice at building your speed? Don't know if there is any trick or secret to playing at that speed? Platefire
     
  14. babalooga

    babalooga Tele-Holic

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    @Platefire, my favorite key is "A" I do a lot in "A" and I can get a lot of good open string stuff going on. I can play guitar or mandolin and keep up pretty much with anyone (I don't mean to sound like I'm bragging). I used to spend a lot of time just playing along with records and cd's, the longer you stay at it the faster you will get. I have a very fast right hand whether playing mandolin or guitar. Playing in jams with people better than you will make you push yourself harder. There are some people that reach a certain level and stay there. Like Dirty Harry said, "A man's got to know his own limits". Practice, practice, practice.
     
  15. brogh

    brogh Moderator Staff Member

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    Altough culturally bluegrass is something tha around here doesn't really show up, listening to the radio as little boy from time to time it happened that a bluegrass song comes on, i love particularely this one, I also think she's one of the greatest singer you have over there.



    Cheers
     
  16. Platefire

    Platefire Friend of Leo's

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    Thanks for the tips babalooga

    What kind of mando are you playing on. I've been wanting to move up to a nice F style. I bought a cheap Guitar Works A style a couple of years ago that has the oval sound hole as shown in first post. I like it because it has a nice mellow sound but the face of the body at the bridge is dropping from string pressure. I keep raising the bridge but if it keeps dropping there will soon be no adjustment left.
    I came close to purchasing a Washburn M3SWE F style the other day but the shop keeper wouldn't talk down, so I didn't get it. I also tried a Morgan Monroe F style. Its fingerboard/neck was a little larger than the Washburn that I kind of liked, easier to get around on. I'm still looking. Any reasonable priced recommendations?

    On another note, I have got to see Bill Monroe twice and maybe three times, can't remember for sure. My wife's sisters husband's brother played banjo with Bill for years. When they would come play at the high school auditorium, they would let us know when he was coming and we would go see him. I wasn't into bluegrass back then. It means a lot now, wish I would have took more advantage of the situation and met and talked to them.

    Thanks, Platefire
     
    Last edited: Mar 12, 2016
  17. babalooga

    babalooga Tele-Holic

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    @ Platefire, I'm playing a Flatiron F-5 Artist I think it was built in '96. Gibson bought Flatiron and trashed the company so the older Flatirons are hard to find, most guys don't want to part with them. I've played one or two of "The Loar" brand, and I gotta say they play and sound really good, maybe a little better than a Morgan Monroe in the same price range.

    I saw Bill Monroe I think four times, that guy was a hoss.
     
  18. Platefire

    Platefire Friend of Leo's

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    Thanks, I will do some net searches Flatiron---didn't know about those. I was familiar with The Loar even though I've never played on one. Platefire
     
  19. rebelwoclue

    rebelwoclue Poster Extraordinaire Ad Free Member

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    I play a tele - with bluegrass pickers- almost every week. We have a great time!
     
  20. Platefire

    Platefire Friend of Leo's

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    Makes sense! If any electric guitar would fit in the context of mostly acoustic instruments, the clean pure sound of the tele would. Platefire
     
    Last edited: Mar 14, 2016
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