DIY patch cables, major signal loss - what gives??

Discussion in 'The Stomp Box' started by joel_ostrom, Jun 20, 2013.

  1. joel_ostrom

    joel_ostrom Tele-Afflicted

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    I was making some patch cables to connect the pedals on my board with some low profile switchcraft input jacks and Canare GS-4. I tested two of them after they were finished and there was a significant signal loss.

    It doesn't make sense, i used the same cable to make a different patch cable and there was no change in signal.

    Could it be bad jacks?
    Did I wreck the jacks somehow during the soldering process? Or the cable?

    I was using a lot of heat on the soldering iron so that I could get the solder to adhere to the inside of the flat part of the jack (for grounding). Could this have done something to wreck the jack?

    Anybody have any ideas?
     
  2. jnepo1

    jnepo1 Tele-Meister

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    Sutton, Ma
    Did you peel back the black conductive liner surrounding the center wire? Because it is conductive, if it touches the center wire, it will short out the signal. The black liner is already in contact with the shield wire and touching the center wire would cause a short or in your case, signal loss.
     
  3. joel_ostrom

    joel_ostrom Tele-Afflicted

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    Location:
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    Yes, there is a layer of conductive liner in the Canare GS-4. I wasn't aware that it was mildly conductive. I tried resoldering the cable and making sure that layer was completely removed from anywhere close to the center conductor. Worked great.

    THanks!
     
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