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DIY "candy" paint?

Discussion in 'Finely Finished' started by goodchicken, Apr 21, 2021.

  1. goodchicken

    goodchicken TDPRI Member

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    So if I understand correctly, candy paints that the automotive guys use are just dyes mixed into a carrier. Am I on the right path in thinking that I could make my own colors using various dyes mixed into a carrier? (in this case it'd be an "intercoat" from an automotive paint company).

    If so, what dye to try? Aniline? Alky based? And my apologies if I'm really off base on this...partially going off stuff I think I read long ago.
     
  2. Dacious

    Dacious Poster Extraordinaire

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    Not quite.

    True Candy Apple paint as used by Fender used a gold or silver metallic base with a translucent or partially clear red over it. You'd mix solid with clear to replicate this. Several coats, then clear over the top.
     
  3. goodchicken

    goodchicken TDPRI Member

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    One side note I think worth pointing out, and maybe shoulda said so in the original post...nomenclature seems all over the place in the paint world :lol: So hopefully there's not too much confusion just about terminology, but I suspect it's highly likely.

    I have both silver and gold metallic base to try. The "candy" paint over top or "translucent" if you will is the only part I'm no totally certain about....I think lol

    So if I understand correctly, you can do "candy" in many colors, not just red. And I thought I'd read that somewhere awhile back...but not sure where. Searched here and didn't find it.

    So my thought was what kinda pigment can be used to make these translucent colors? And to go even deeper...why would some "pigment" work where others wouldn't. For example, my hunch is you'd need a pigment with very tiny granules. So that means you couldn't use a flake or maybe a "mica" powder like the hobby store has. Maybe? :confused:
     
  4. Dacious

    Dacious Poster Extraordinaire

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    The pigment is just the normal tinter they use to colour paint. It looks like paint, it's composed of the same binders and solvent. Binders is what holds the pigment, solvent carries the paint then evaporates to leave the binders and pigment.

    You can have candy anything. Translucent just means see-through.

    Normally with a solid colour you want it as opaque as possible so you use less paint/coats so the paint is full of tint.

    With a candy finish you want to be able to see the metallic base coat. So the colour coats are mixed with 20, 30 or more percent clear.

    Fender blonde is the same - white is mixed with clear then fogged on to show ash grain. Or fogged on very thinly.

    Fender used gold in the 50s CAR but that gives a darker more burgundy finish. So they went silver metallic base in the 60s which is lighter and more candy coloured.

    Don't confuse candy apple paints with tinted grain woods like Gibson does. They dye the wood grain to make it stand out, using black and other colours. Then clearcoat it. To achieve a burst they use more dark dye on the edges like below then sand it gradually to reveal.

    IMG_20210416_100655.jpg
     
    Last edited: Apr 21, 2021
    gerhard_k likes this.
  5. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Poster Extraordinaire

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    Traditional candy apple paints from the 1960s were translucent lacquers sprayed over metallic (usually gold) base coats. Dyes are used to make the translucent top coats - you can see the metallic thru the colored finish (pigments are used to make solid colors). Spraying a true candy finish involves very good control of your gun - the base gold must be absolutely flawless and the translucent colored coats must be consistently the same thickness and color. There is often a few clear coats shot on top of that.

    You can do a few other things - making the base coat a metallic flake creates that sparkly look, other base coats (sliver) give a different look.

    I have never shot a true candy apple finish (since my hot rod days) but I frequently tint clear lacquer with transtint stains - the guitar is colored but you can still see the wood grain thru the finish. That is not candy apple but is a lot more common on wood.
     
  6. stratisfied

    stratisfied Tele-Holic

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    As Freeman said the candy colors are very difficult to apply evenly. Forget aerosol cans as they give streaky uneven results unless your spraying technique is perfect and you are working with small area covered completely by the fan pattern of the nozzle. Using a compressor and gun is easier but best left to a painter experienced with candy colors.

    A sunburst fades in from an opaque edge (rim) towards the center and is more tolerant of variations in color depth in the transition.
     
  7. sleazy pot pie

    sleazy pot pie Tele-Afflicted Gold Supporter

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    If you are looking for candy paints to add to urethane color blender/intercoat clear, House of Kolor is the most commonly used. The issue I ran into is that it is like colortone/transtint in that it is pretty expensive per color. 40-50$ for a small bottle of , I believe, 8oz.
    But like colortone and transtint, a little goes a long way.

    I recently found Tropical Glitz online and they offer either 2oz bottles of concentrated candy or 4oz premixed with color blender/intercoat that is ready to spray.
    These bottles are only $15-$20. And a little does indeed go a long way.
    They also have a ton of paint colors as well as flakes.
     
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