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DIY 12" Baffle Board for Princeton Reverb

Discussion in 'Shock Brother's DIY Amps' started by jchabalk, Oct 19, 2020.

  1. jchabalk

    jchabalk Tele-Meister

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    I've been messing around with my Princeton Reverb lately and after connecting it to a few different speakers i have in other amps around here i'm pretty set on swapping out the 10" speaker in it for a 12".

    I have it in a Mojotone PR cabinet with a 10" baffleboard and was just going to order a 12" board to swap it out. The problem (it's not really a big problem) is that Mojotone has an 8 week delay on shipping cabinet parts due to COVID and reduced staff in the woodshop.

    I've been reading around on making a baffle board and have or have access to everything i'd need to do it. I'm wondering if a) there are any templates for a 12" baffle board (the mojotone one doesn't have the full speaker circle cutout so the Fender logo can be be screwed in so i don't get the speaker in the wrong spot.

    I'm not sure if i'll do this or not but it sounds like a viable weekend project for this city dweller.

    I could also open up the hole in my existing 10" board, i have a feeling i'd ruin the grill cloth in the process of trying to re-staple it.
     
  2. DrBGood

    DrBGood Tele-Holic

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    Pictures of existing baffle ?

    Chances are that the 12" will need baffle side braces to be munched at to fit it.
     
  3. jsnwhite619

    jsnwhite619 Friend of Leo's

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  4. DrBGood

    DrBGood Tele-Holic

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    My advice: use ¾". I too thought a baffle needed to vibrate to the speaker frequency. What a lot of bull. I used 5/8" on a 2X10" and 1X12" baffles and it didn't take long for them to end up as firewood.
     
  5. Lowerleftcoast

    Lowerleftcoast Friend of Leo's

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    Here is a hint for the noob...

    Do the speaker cutout first and make the straight cuts last. It is easier to get the speaker hole exactly where you want it this way.
     
  6. jsnwhite619

    jsnwhite619 Friend of Leo's

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    What type of wood did you use? I go with 3/8" baltic birch for anything 2x10 or less. This stuff is real, void-free cabinet grade plywood, no sawdust filler. I left a piece in the back of my truck for a couple months or so in the sun, rain, and dew. The outside layer facing upward started lifting and getting some ripples in it, but it still was solid and had a good crack when you hit it.
     
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  7. EsquireOK

    EsquireOK Friend of Leo's

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    I have read that you don't even need to use a 12" hole to put a 12" speaker in a PR. You can just put new mounting holes a little wider than the stock ones, and have the 12" speaker sounding through the stock 10" hole. Haven't done this myself, but it's worth looking into whether or not it actually works.
     
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  8. jsnwhite619

    jsnwhite619 Friend of Leo's

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    Not drilling through the grill, and mounting it with anything but wood screws would probably be a real chore.
     
  9. EsquireOK

    EsquireOK Friend of Leo's

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    No, it wouldn't. First of all, know how to use/control basic tools and take common sense precautions to protect your work, or don't even consider projects like this. All you need to do is push the grill cloth away from the baffle as you drill, or even slip a piece of something in there as a guard/buffer. Second, use grabber nuts.

    Are we really living in a world where common sense, 5th grade shop class stuff like this is considered "a real chore?" Maybe so...but if true...pathetic.

    At any rate, the physical mounting is far from a concern. The real concern is, does the 1" rim of wood in front of the edge of your 12" speaker cone affect your tone?
     
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  10. Phrygian77

    Phrygian77 Friend of Leo's Gold Supporter

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    PXL_20201020_002720772.jpg
     
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  11. jsnwhite619

    jsnwhite619 Friend of Leo's

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    You're probably right, I'm still pretty new at this.
     
  12. RLM69

    RLM69 TDPRI Member

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    I did this with a piece of 1/2" Baltic Birch plywood I purchased from Home Depot. You can use a small straight blade screwdriver and pry the staples out of the 10" baffle and not damage the grill cloth. Actually, if you cut the baffle to the same size as the one you are removing, the grill cloth will wrap right over the sides and you can use a staple gun with 1/2" staples and you won't even notice the difference between factory and what you did. I cut the speaker hole pretty much in the center of the baffle and there is no issue with clearance. This is in a tweed PRRI with a WGS 12 C/S speaker. You can do it!
     
  13. Nickfl

    Nickfl Friend of Leo's

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    If you decide to do it yourself, get decent plywood. You want real Baltic Birch like the stuff @jsnwhite619 linked to and you'll probably need to get it from either someplace like woodcraft or a commercial cabinet maker supply place (some sell to the public some don't). There's a world of difference between real Baltic birch plywood which is all veneer core and the stuff you get at the home center which in my experience don't carry true Baltic Birch ply.

    As for construction, @Phrygian77's picture shows what you want to do. You're not cutting out a partial hole, you're cutting the properly sized hole for your speaker then putting a triangle of material across one corner for the logo when you attach the furring strips that hold the grill cloth off the baffle.

    You shouldn't need a template for any of this, you can cut out a perfect circle with a simple jig for a router. That's the way I used to do it, but lately I've switched to just drawing on my speaker cut out and then cutting it out just inside the line with a scroll saw and sanding to the line on the spindle sander it's faster and less messy than using a router and it's easy to make it look just as good as using the router jig (if not better).
     
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  14. jsnwhite619

    jsnwhite619 Friend of Leo's

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    I'll use 1/2" for bigger 2x12 cabs, but I honestly don't know what it would take to break a piece of that 3/8" Baltic birch plywood. More than I'll ever throw at it. I'll add a brace strip on a 2x10 between the speakers on the front, but I think it's more for worry than necessity. I use a template that has the mounting holes drilled. Drill the holes, T-nuts on the new baffle, screw the template to that, rough cut with a jigsaw, then use a guide bit to clean it up and get it right on the router table.
     
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  15. ArcticWhite

    ArcticWhite Tele-Afflicted

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    I have a 73 SFPR, with a black faced circuit.
    I mounted a vintage 12 inch Jensen speaker on the existing baffle over the 10 inch hole. Used t-nuts as described above (grabber nuts).

    Sound checked next to a 67 BFPR. No difference. You could not tell which amp the guitar was plugged in to.

    There's no need to cut a new hole, or to change the baffle.

    Just lay the amp on its face, and lay your speaker where it will fit without hitting anything. Mark the holes. Place a piece of metal between the cloth and baffle. Drill.
     
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