Dining in my hotel room - tactics?

slauson slim

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I often traveled on business to South West, Mountain West and PNW state capitals. Come evening I’d look for a congenial thirst parlor that served food. Hang out, eat, have a few drinks, watch a game and interact with folks.
 

ReverendRevolver

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Uncle bens Red beans an rice packets, and Campbell's chicken gumbo. Pour some of the liquid from the gumbo into the red beans and rice pouch after microwaving both, and stir. Makes it less dry.
 

johnny k

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each day get some fresh stuffs and eat them for dinner. 2 slices of ham in a sandwich with tomato or lettuce or mustard on the first day, maybe get a take away on the 2 days, noodles if you like them, and pack of crisps and a few drinkable for the 4 days. I had to do this once, it is not really fun, but i made it.
 

old soul

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An electric tea kettle opens up possibilities with dehydrated foods like grits/oatmeal, camping meals including pad thai, stroganoff and almost anything else you can think of
 

Greggorios

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I often traveled on business to South West, Mountain West and PNW state capitals. Come evening I’d look for a congenial thirst parlor that served food. Hang out, eat, have a few drinks, watch a game and interact with folks.
+1, best way to get a quick taste of life in the area.
 

bgmacaw

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mre06.png
 

Junkyard Dog

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Typically the seminar organizers or hotel front desk personnel will have put together a print out of local restaurants. Throw that thing right in the trash, then go outside and ask the guys cutting the grass where are the good places to eat in town.
 

Chikubi

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Restaurants exist for a reason, and if I’ve been cooped up in a hotel all day already, I sure as hell don’t want to spend any more time there eating crackers and tuna. Chain or local, doesn’t matter - whatever works and gets me outside to see the world for a bit is enough.
 

Nightclub Dwight

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I lived in a hotel Monday through Thursday nights for two years for a previous job. I had a modest meal allowance. I had a fridge and a microwave in the room. I got most of my food from the prepared foods section at Whole Foods and Wegman's. It worked out great and I ate really well. I usually had enough of my meal allowance left on Thursday that I'd buy some extra food for the weekend, which I kept in a cooler in my car on Friday.

The people working at the Whole Foods prepared food section knew me, and they'd save me my favorites if they were in danger of selling out before I got there. I haven't been to a Whole Foods since Amazon bought them, so I don't know if this is still a viable strategy, but the general idea should still work out.
 

dented

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Be aware that the "refrigerators" in most hotel rooms don't get cold enough to actually preserve food, they're just for chilling drinks.
Bananas. I've traveled for my work sometimes staying in hotels up tp 30 times a year. I've always kept food in my hotel fridge. Not once did anything spoil and most times it was the opposite having to adjust the fridge temp. Of course I never stayed in Motel 5.
 

beyer160

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Bananas. I've traveled for my work sometimes staying in hotels up tp 30 times a year. I've always kept food in my hotel fridge. Not once did anything spoil and most times it was the opposite having to adjust the fridge temp. Of course I never stayed in Motel 5.
Before the Thing We Can't Talk About, I averaged around 100 nights a year in hotels, mostly large convention and resort properties. Some of those places don't even HAVE refrigerators in the rooms, because big conventions have meals and break services all day for attendees and they'd rather you get ridiculously overpriced food from room service anyway. I've seen some (maybe in Canada?) that actually stated NOT FOR FOOD STORAGE right on the door. Safe temperature for food storage is 40 degrees and below, I've been told by a hotel manager that the average hotel fridge will only hit 41. That's because electricity is expensive and no one really keeps food in those things- they're mainly for water and soda.

Extended stay/residence properties like Homewood Suites and Residence Inns will have better fridges, though (and probably microwaves) because people actually use them, and they're an amenity that people go to those places to get.

I like having a cold drink at the end of the day, and usually stock my room fridge with beer and soda. Often, they don't get much beyond cool. Here's my experiences from the last 60 days-

Westin Boston (Seaport)- Weak fridge, but I didn't try keeping food in it.

The Boca Raton resort, Boca Raton FL- Weak fridge. I put some leftover Vindaloo in there on the off chance it'd keep but it was barely cool the next night when I got to it, so I tossed it and went out for tacos. If you're staying at the Boca and your fridge smells like Indian food, I'm sorry.

Wyndham, Clearwater FL- I was in the Presidential Suite with a full kitchen including full sized refrigerator, so this one doesn't count.

Intercontinental, Boston- no fridge


Take this all with however many grains of salt you wish, but just think twice before storing chicken or pork in a hotel fridge.
 




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