Difference between "Blues" and "Blues Rock".

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by Tony Forman, Feb 14, 2018.

  1. william tele

    william tele Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    One of them is clearly not a sport...
     
  2. Mike Eskimo

    Mike Eskimo Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    This rocks (as does the jacket) and it might be blues but who cares ?

     
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  3. Obsessed

    Obsessed Telefied Ad Free Member

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    This is a great thread, because the difference is subtle, but at the same time obvious. Definitely not acoustic vs. electric. Definitely not straight eight notes. Definitely not soul (although this is getting close IMO). I'm thinking that southern blues/rock is the bridge between the two, but I don't think that fits in chronologically. My thought is that Scotty Moore has the answer. I will be following this thread more, because someone here probably can articulate the difference and that would be pretty darn cool.
     
    Last edited: Feb 14, 2018
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  4. ScottJPatrick

    ScottJPatrick Friend of Leo's

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    I can play Blues Rock......................
     
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  5. Flyinlow

    Flyinlow Tele-Meister

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    A very blurry line between them. One isn't necessarily louder or dirtier. Both use the more traditional tones of guitars and amps, generally. Some whole albums of blues-rockers transcend other styles, be it Reggae, Prog, even proto-metal...
     
  6. Modman68

    Modman68 Tele-Holic

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    There aren’t hard lines on this subject, it all falls into a continuum, but you already know that.

    This swings, favors space and feel. Overall, I agree, this is blues, but it does fall closer to rock than “The thrill is gone”.
     
  7. Larry F

    Larry F Doctor of Teleocity Vendor Member

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    Blues rock players use more dorian than blues players, on the whole. When I hear a blues song, I don't notice as many semitones as a blues rock song. I have a suspicion that guys from Europe who adopted the blues, did so with European ears and sensibilities. The result was a folk or Gypsy influence with semitones liberally used in a guitar solo. In this scenario, the player doesn't always make a strong delineation between half-steps and whole-steps. This promotes more scalar and linear motion in the solos.

    American blues players tend to use a minor pent, with substitutes from Eb to D and with Bb to A, in the key of a C blues. By substituting in this way, no semitones will be formed by any adjacent notes. This is not to say the semitones are not used by the Americans. But they use them in different contexts. For example, an American blues player in a C blues emphasizes the minor pent (which is a subset of dorian) in melodic, linear passages. The semitones produced by Bb-A and Eb-D are not linearized so much by Brit players. American players often like to sit on one of the notes, and goose it up-down, a la BB King and Albert King. The Brit players like a smoother, more melodically connected approach. The most extreme form of this style is something like Gary Moore's Parisian Walkways schtick. I say schtick because he tended to use the same approach with almost any minor blues.
     
  8. kelnet

    kelnet Telefied Ad Free Member

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    This might be a really simplistic question that exposes my ignorance, but does a major-key solo make a song more rock and less blues?
     
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  9. Obsessed

    Obsessed Telefied Ad Free Member

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    My apologies LarryF, I should have known you were the right person to seek out the answer. Very interesting observation of the differentiation between European blues and American blues.
     
  10. koen

    koen Friend of Leo's

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    Rock
     
  11. rand z

    rand z Friend of Leo's

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    Definately VOLUME and certainly, ATTITUDE!!!
     
  12. DougM

    DougM Friend of Leo's

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    I see it differently than everyone else here. I consider it blues if it adheres to the standard 12 bar format, even if it's played by a rock band with rock stylings. If it deviates from that 12 bar progression, but still uses dominant chords and blues type licks in a different chord progression, then I consider it blues rock.
     
  13. soulgeezer

    soulgeezer Poster Extraordinaire

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    You've never seen Buddy Guy live, have you?

    Easily one of the loudest shows I've ever been to. And, dripping with cool! No to mention, he spent half the night standing on his wah pedal. Yet, there was no question at all that it was the blues.
     
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  14. noah330

    noah330 Friend of Leo's

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    teh hats!
     
  15. soulgeezer

    soulgeezer Poster Extraordinaire

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    So, Howlin' Wolf, B.B. King, Robert Johnson, and Albert King aren't the blues? (None of them ever even pretended to adhere to the "standard 12 bar format." In fact, I'm tempted to argue that strict adherence to a 12-bar structure might be evidence that it's NOT the blues, but rather blues-rock!)
     
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  16. Frank'n'censed

    Frank'n'censed Doctor of Teleocity

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    Guitar solos are only one aspect of the blues vs. blues rock deal...the rhythm section and other soloists are also a huge component of the whole
     
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  17. SURF

    SURF Tele-Holic

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    I wish I could understand what you have said... But I like it.
     
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  18. -Hawk-

    -Hawk- Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    According to the dictionary, about four points on the eliteness scale.
     
  19. Sollipsist

    Sollipsist Tele-Afflicted

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    There's exceptions to every rule, but for my generation, blues was made by black people who died before we we born, while blues rock was made by white people who ran out of good ideas before we were born :D
     
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  20. Geo

    Geo Friend of Leo's

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    No pedals vs pedal board ;)
     
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